sustainability-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Green Infrastructures: Theoretical Aspects, Experimental Tests and Numerical Analyses

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 June 2024 | Viewed by 2555

Special Issue Editors

Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna, Italy
Interests: green infrastructures; building efficiency; sustainable development; green roofs
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural and Food Sciences, Alma Mater Studiorum Università di Bologna, Viale G. Fanin 48, 40127 Bologna, Italy
Interests: ventilation systems; green walls; greenhouses; CFD; animal housing; crop growth; LCA

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Given growing environmental problems such as global warming, deforestation, and waste generation, applying the concept of sustainability to the construction sector is of paramount importance. Moreover, with the remarkable growth of cities and the increase in built-up areas, mitigating the urban heat island effect has become one of the most crucial challenges in social and environmental sustainability, with significant impacts on public health. All active and passive technologies must be used to design energy-efficient buildings and minimize their energy consumption. All of this implies a transition towards new approaches and technical solutions, but also to reliable sustainability indicators to properly identify the most effective interventions. Zero-impact or at least low-impact technical solutions are imperative.

In the general field of technology, green infrastructure could play a significant role and act a protagonist to achieve several of the Sustainable Development Goals outlined in the 2030 Agenda of the United Nations. The adoption of green infrastructure can help to improve not only building energy use but also stormwater management and mitigate the urban heat island, with cascading benefits and improvements in secondary and related sectors. In recent years, increasing attention has been paid to green roofs, green walls, parking gardens, rain gardens, pocket parks, parkways, and greenways, something that is mainly due to the wide range of benefits that they can provide. Green infrastructure offers a solid pathway and can contribute to making cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient, and sustainable.

In the grand scheme of things, researchers are fundamental because they participate in innovative processes and are responsible for disseminating results that could have a direct effect on society, policy decisions, and urban and rural management planning.

In this Special Issue, we invite contributions investigating green infrastructure under plural aspects and approaches to provide a sustainable solution in urban and rural contexts, supporting the transition to sustainable development models from the environmental, economic, and social points of views. Although green infrastructure is already relatively well consolidated in climate adaptation strategies, further contributions dedicated to the link between green infrastructure and integrated landscape planning, long-term investments, urban and rural planning, and sustainability as part of the decision-making process are strongly recommended. Moreover, experimental tests, frameworks, monitoring evidence, and examples of good green infrastructure design for climate change adaptation and mitigation will be taken in consideration, as will numerical analyses and work on the development and application of green infrastructures, as the focus is not only on environmental impact quantification.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Marco Bovo
Dr. Enrica Santolini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • green infrastructure
  • green roof
  • green wall
  • sustainability
  • resilient infrastructure
  • heat island mitigation
  • environmental adaptation
  • air pollution
  • CFD
  • LCA

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

13 pages, 3118 KiB  
Article
Assessment of the Influence of Canopy Morphology on Leaf Area Density and Drag Coefficient by Means of Wind Tunnel Tests
by Shahad Hasan Flayyih Al-Rikabi, Enrica Santolini, Beatrice Pulvirenti, Alberto Barbaresi, Daniele Torreggiani, Patrizia Tassinari and Marco Bovo
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2010; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052010 - 29 Feb 2024
Viewed by 602
Abstract
This paper investigates the aerodynamic behavior of Basil (i.e., Ocimum basilicum) and Mentuccia (i.e., Clinopodium nepeta (L.) Kuntze), emphasizing the impact of plant structure on drag force. In this paper, the drag coefficient is assessed for the two crop species under various [...] Read more.
This paper investigates the aerodynamic behavior of Basil (i.e., Ocimum basilicum) and Mentuccia (i.e., Clinopodium nepeta (L.) Kuntze), emphasizing the impact of plant structure on drag force. In this paper, the drag coefficient is assessed for the two crop species under various configurations, starting from the pressure drop measured through wind tunnel tests. The methodology involves an innovative use of image processing techniques to determine the leaf area density (LAD) for both Basil and Mentuccia. This approach allows for a precise differentiation between leaf areas and crop pores, crucial for accurate aerodynamic analysis. For Basil, LAD values ranged from 2.41 to 5.08 m2 · m−3, while Mentuccia displayed LAD values between 1.17 and 1.93 m2 · m−3, depending on the crop configuration. This study provides the relationship between plant morphology, canopy density, and drag coefficient, highlighting how these aspects are influenced by different wind velocities. These results are fundamental and necessary for the proper definition of crop behavior and the aerodynamic parameters in Computational Fluid Dynamics simulations. This knowledge is not only fundamental to the field of agricultural aerodynamics but also has significant implications for optimizing crop planting and arrangement, leading to more efficient farming practices and better understanding of plant–environment interactions. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 4799 KiB  
Article
People-Oriented: A Framework for Evaluating the Level of Green Space Provision in the Life Circle from a Supply and Demand Perspective: A Case Study of Gulou District, Nanjing, China
by Hancheng Xia, Rui Yin, Tianyu Xia, Bing Zhao and Bing Qiu
Sustainability 2024, 16(3), 955; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16030955 - 23 Jan 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1091
Abstract
Green space resources, in the context of urbanisation, cannot meet the actual needs of residents well, and the study of the balance of green space resource allocation based on the relationship between supply and demand is an urgent problem to be solved. This [...] Read more.
Green space resources, in the context of urbanisation, cannot meet the actual needs of residents well, and the study of the balance of green space resource allocation based on the relationship between supply and demand is an urgent problem to be solved. This study quantitatively evaluates the green space supply level from four dimensions by constructing a framework for assessment in the community life circle. It also evaluates the matching of green space supply and demand, resource distribution fairness, and distribution equilibrium under group differentiation through the supply–demand coupling matrix, the Gini coefficient, and the Kruskal–Wallis H non-parametric rank-sum test, respectively. This study shows that: (1) A significant spatial imbalance exists in green space resource allocation in community life circles in different dimensions. (2) The comprehensive green space supply level in the community life circle matched the total demand of residents to a low degree. (3) There was significant inequality in green space resource allocation within the community life circle (the Gini coefficient of each evaluation perspective was >0.4). Based on the study results, we were able to identify community life circles with spatial mismatches, different supply and demand, and other green space resource allocation problems, which is of great significance to urban green space research and planning practice under the ‘green justice’ framework. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop