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Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (21 April 2024) | Viewed by 5058

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Padua, 35121 Padova, Italy
Interests: electricity price and demand forecasting; robust statistics; time series forecasting
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Padova, via Cesare Battisti 241, 35121 Padova, Italy
Interests: energy economics; energy markets; environmental economics; applied statistics; applied economics; economic evaluation of investments projects; real option evaluation; public economics and utility regulation; carbon emissions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The urgent need to address the intertwined challenges of energy sources, carbon emissions, and economic growth has become increasingly apparent in our quest for sustainable development. As the global community strives to transition towards a low-carbon economy, it is crucial to explore the complex relationships and potential synergies between these critical dimensions.

Sustainability invites researchers, academics, policymakers, and industry experts to contribute to a Special Issue dedicated to advancing our understanding of the intricate interplay between energy sources, carbon emissions, and economic growth. This Special Issue aims to provide a platform for the dissemination of cutting-edge research, innovative methodologies, and actionable insights that can inform effective strategies and policies for a sustainable future.

We welcome original research papers, review articles, and case studies that address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

  • Energy transition pathways and their implications for economic growth;
  • Assessment of renewable energy technologies and their role in carbon mitigation;
  • Analysis of the environmental and economic impacts of different energy sources;
  • Modelling the relationship between carbon emissions, energy consumption, and economic indicators;
  • Policy frameworks for promoting sustainable energy sources and reducing carbon emissions;
  • The role of innovation and technological advancements in fostering sustainable economic growth;
  • Socio-economic aspects of energy transition and their implications for different regions and communities;
  • Energy efficiency measures and their potential for decoupling economic growth from carbon emissions;
  • Strategies for fostering collaboration between academia, industry, and policymakers in addressing these challenges;
  • Case studies showcasing successful initiatives and best practices in achieving a harmonious balance between energy sources, carbon emissions, and economic growth;
  • Emission trading systems and their future development;
  • Carbon balance sheets: experiences and new possible applications.

Authors are encouraged to adopt multidisciplinary approaches and present rigorous analyses supported by robust methodologies. All submissions will undergo a thorough peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific standards and relevance to the theme of the Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Luigi Grossi
Dr. Marina Bertolini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy transition
  • carbon emissions
  • climate change
  • economic growth
  • renewable energy
  • sustainable development
  • energy efficiency
  • low-carbon economy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 759 KiB  
Article
Formulating Eco-Friendly Strategies: Transition to Green Economy
by Irfan Kadioglu and Ismail Bulent Gurbuz
Sustainability 2024, 16(11), 4492; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16114492 (registering DOI) - 25 May 2024
Viewed by 208
Abstract
Turkey is attempting to achieve carbon neutrality targets by implementing environmentally friendly techniques. This study aims to assess the short- and long-term relationships between Turkey’s annual carbon emissions and economic growth, as well as annual electricity generation from renewable fossil fuels. Data for [...] Read more.
Turkey is attempting to achieve carbon neutrality targets by implementing environmentally friendly techniques. This study aims to assess the short- and long-term relationships between Turkey’s annual carbon emissions and economic growth, as well as annual electricity generation from renewable fossil fuels. Data for this study were obtained from the World Bank and the official website of the Turkish Statistical Institute (TURKSTAT) from 1986 to 2020. The Autoregressive Distributed Lag Bound Test (ARDL) technique was used to estimate variable cointegration. The cointegration test shows a long-run relationship between the selected variables. A 1% increase in the GDP, COAL, and PTRLGZ variables increases CO2 emissions by 0.65%, 33%, and 7%, respectively. The RE variable was found to have a negative effect on CO2 emissions. The effect of the RE variable on CO2 emissions is −0.10. This result indicates that a 1% increase in the RE variable reduces CO2 emissions by 0.10%. Looking at the short-term data, the error correction coefficient (CointEq (−1)) was found to be negative (−0.832) and significant. Based on the error correction variable, it is expected that the short-run deviations from equilibrium will be corrected and that a long-run equilibrium will be reached in less than one year. The long-run results also suggest that the factors used in the model have a statistically significant effect on the dependent variable. While this effect is negative for annual electricity production from renewable energy sources, it is positive for annual electricity production from fossil fuels and gross domestic product (GDP). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
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24 pages, 10456 KiB  
Article
Analysis of the Driving Mechanism of Urban Carbon Emission Correlation Network in Shandong Province Based on TERGM
by Jiekun Song, Huisheng Xiao and Zhicheng Liu
Sustainability 2024, 16(10), 4233; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16104233 - 17 May 2024
Viewed by 323
Abstract
Analyzing the driving factors and mechanisms of urban carbon emission correlation networks can provide effective carbon reduction decision-making support for Shandong Province and other regions with similar industrial characteristics. Based on industrial carbon emission data from various cities in Shandong Province from 2013 [...] Read more.
Analyzing the driving factors and mechanisms of urban carbon emission correlation networks can provide effective carbon reduction decision-making support for Shandong Province and other regions with similar industrial characteristics. Based on industrial carbon emission data from various cities in Shandong Province from 2013 to 2021, the spatial correlation network of carbon emission was established by using a modified gravity model. The characteristics of the network were explored by using the Social Network Analysis (SNA) method, and significant factors affecting the network were identified through Quadratic Assignment Procedure (QAP) correlation analysis and motif analysis. The driving mechanism of the carbon emission correlation network was analyzed by using Temporal Exponential Random Graph Models (TERGMs). The results show that: (1) The spatial correlation network of urban carbon emission in Shandong Province exhibits multi-threaded complex network correlations with a relatively stable structure, overcoming geographical distance limitations. (2) Qingdao, Jinan, and Rizhao have high degree centrality, betweenness centrality, and closeness centrality in the network, with Qingdao and Jinan being relatively central. (3) Shandong Province can be spatially clustered into four regions, each with distinct roles, displaying a certain “neighboring clustering” phenomenon. (4) Endogenous network structures such as Mutual, Ctriple, and Gwesp significantly impact the formation and evolution of the network, while Twopath does not show the expected impact; FDI can promote the generation of carbon emission reception relationships in the spatial correlation network; IR can promote the generation of carbon emission spillover relationships in the spatial correlation network; GS, differences in GDP, differences in EI, and similarities of IR can promote the generation of organic correlations within the network; on the temporal level, the spatial correlation network of urban carbon emission in Shandong Province has shown significant stability during the study period. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
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25 pages, 431 KiB  
Article
The Green Engine of Growth: Assessing the Influence of Renewable Energy Consumption and Environmental Policy on China’s Economic Sustainability
by Lin Wang, Yugang He and Renhong Wu
Sustainability 2024, 16(8), 3120; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16083120 - 9 Apr 2024
Viewed by 778
Abstract
Utilizing Fourier autoregressive distributed lag and Fourier Toda–Yamamoto causality methodologies, this research assesses the effects that renewable energy consumption and environmental policy had on the economic sustainability of China from 1991 to 2022. Our findings highlight the positive impacts of renewable energy use [...] Read more.
Utilizing Fourier autoregressive distributed lag and Fourier Toda–Yamamoto causality methodologies, this research assesses the effects that renewable energy consumption and environmental policy had on the economic sustainability of China from 1991 to 2022. Our findings highlight the positive impacts of renewable energy use and stringent environmental policies on China’s economic growth, while also pinpointing the supportive roles played by foreign direct investment, trade openness, and financial sector evolution in fostering a sustainable economic environment. Conversely, a reliance on fossil fuels emerges as a significant barrier to sustainability. Causality tests confirm the essential roles of renewable energy and environmental policies in advancing China’s economic sustainability. This study underscores the critical need for integrating sustainable energy and environmental strategies within China’s economic development framework, advocating for a holistic policy approach that balances economic growth with environmental conservation. This research underscores the imperative for a sustainability-centered strategy for China’s economic advancement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
29 pages, 1132 KiB  
Article
Unraveling Korea’s Energy Challenge: The Consequences of Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Energy Use on Economic Sustainability
by Yao Li and Yugang He
Sustainability 2024, 16(5), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16052074 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1089
Abstract
This research delves into the effects of carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption on economic growth in Korea from 1980 to 2022, employing a sophisticated nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag model. The study unveils pivotal findings, most notably the positive association between carbon dioxide [...] Read more.
This research delves into the effects of carbon dioxide emissions and energy consumption on economic growth in Korea from 1980 to 2022, employing a sophisticated nonlinear autoregressive distributed lag model. The study unveils pivotal findings, most notably the positive association between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth, suggesting that periods of economic expansion in Korea have been accompanied by surges in emissions. Furthermore, the investigation highlights a significant, albeit asymmetrical, positive impact of primary energy consumption on economic growth, illuminating the critical role of energy in the nation’s economic trajectory. The analysis also identifies essential economic determinants—namely, the labor force, gross fixed capital formation, and net inflows of foreign direct investment—underscoring their pivotal contributions to economic proliferation. The reliability of these insights is corroborated through advanced econometric techniques, including fully modified ordinary least squares and dynamic ordinary least squares methods. A noteworthy discovery emerges from the Toda–Yamamoto causality test, revealing bidirectional Granger causality between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth, as well as between energy consumption and economic growth. Moreover, it uncovers a unidirectional causality flowing from labor, capital formation, and foreign direct investment towards economic growth. These findings elucidate the complex interplay between environmental and economic elements, highlighting the critical need for sustainable energy policies and proactive environmental stewardship in Korea. By advocating for a synthesis of economic advancement and environmental sustainability, this study presents indispensable insights for policymakers. It calls for a judicious approach to balancing Korea’s economic ambitions with its ecological responsibilities, thereby charting a sustainable path forward for the nation. Through its comprehensive analysis, this research contributes valuable perspectives to the discourse on economic development and environmental sustainability, offering guidance for Korea’s strategic planning and policy formulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
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40 pages, 8310 KiB  
Article
Proposal and Comprehensive Analysis of a Novel Combined Plant with Gas Turbine and Organic Flash Cycles: An Application of Multi-Objective Optimization
by Ramin Ghiami Sardroud, Amirreza Javaherian, Seyed Mohammad Seyed Mahmoudi, Mehri Akbari Kordlar and Marc A. Rosen
Sustainability 2023, 15(19), 14152; https://doi.org/10.3390/su151914152 - 25 Sep 2023
Viewed by 867
Abstract
Environmental, exergo-economic, and thermodynamic viewpoints are thoroughly investigated for a state-of-the-art hybrid gas turbine system and organic flash cycle. For the proposed system, the organic flash cycle utilizes the waste thermal energy of the gases exiting the gas turbine sub-system to generate additional [...] Read more.
Environmental, exergo-economic, and thermodynamic viewpoints are thoroughly investigated for a state-of-the-art hybrid gas turbine system and organic flash cycle. For the proposed system, the organic flash cycle utilizes the waste thermal energy of the gases exiting the gas turbine sub-system to generate additional electrical power. Six distinct working fluids are considered for the organic flash cycle: R245fa, n-nonane, n-octane, n-heptane, n-hexane, and n-pentane. A parametric investigation is applied on the proposed combined system to evaluate the impacts of seven decision parameters on the following key operational variables: levelized total emission, total cost rate, and exergy efficiency. Also, a multi-objective optimization is performed on the proposed system, taking into account the mentioned three performance parameters to determine optimum operational conditions. The results of the multi-objective optimization of the system indicate that the levelized total emission, total cost rate, and exergy efficiency are 74,569 kg/kW, 6873 $/h, and 55%, respectively. These results also indicate the improvements of 16.45%, 6.59%, and 3% from the environmental, economic, and exergy viewpoints, respectively. The findings reveal that utilizing n-nonane as the working fluid in the organic flash cycle can yield the lowest levelized total emission, the lowest total cost rate, and the highest exergy efficiency. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
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Review

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16 pages, 757 KiB  
Review
Sustainable Last-Mile Logistics in Economics Studies: A Systematic Literature Review
by Marina Bertolini, Giulia De Matteis and Alessandro Nava
Sustainability 2024, 16(3), 1205; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16031205 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1107
Abstract
In recent years, many cities throughout the world are facing the impact of last-mile logistics and the resulting rise in urban traffic and pollution. Effects on the environment have been curbed by these dynamics. Urban traffic has a considerable impact in terms of [...] Read more.
In recent years, many cities throughout the world are facing the impact of last-mile logistics and the resulting rise in urban traffic and pollution. Effects on the environment have been curbed by these dynamics. Urban traffic has a considerable impact in terms of noise emissions, road safety and air pollution: hence, both public and private parties should undertake innovative solutions for reducing the negative effects of last-mile logistics and improving their operational effectiveness. This study aims to provide a systematic literature review of studies having as their main topic environmentally sustainable last-mile logistics with the perspective of economic studies. The review of the literature reveals that the majority of recent studies have been based on engineering and urban planning approaches. Costs and benefits of last-mile logistics are approached with a public economics focus, gathering details from the different papers, starting with the business studies and then exploring the technology-oriented ones. This study aims to detect the different topics and policies discussed in the literature, and it suggests how to incorporate them in creating new measures and policies for last-mile logistics in the urban area, or for revamping current ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Energy Sources, Carbon Emissions and Economic Growth)
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