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Sustainable Technology and Systems for the Integration of Renewables in the Energy Islands

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 January 2025 | Viewed by 11276

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines
Interests: electrochemical energy storage; catalysis; energy systems; hydrogen; off-grid systems

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of the Philippines Diliman, Quezon City 1101, Philippines
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; aerodynamics; wind turbines; marine renewable energy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The transition to cleaner forms of energy poses several challenges for island nations. Climate change has increased the level of urgency to adopt more sustainable energy sources and has put pressure on island nations, as they have typically relied on imported fuels to keep their economies running. Additionally, they are more vulnerable to natural disasters, so much so that the level of devastation due to recent natural calamities has been observed to be greater than it has been in previous decades. Limited space for human activities offers a challenge to the governments of island nations in allocating their use of energy, food, and other priority areas. Be that as it may, island nations hold some advantages that may alleviate these problems and that may facilitate the transition to clean energy. Mainstream and alternative forms of renewable energy resources, from conventional geothermal and biomass to intermittent wind and solar to emerging wave and tidal currents, are abundant in several locations that have significant and sufficient potential for exploitation. Finally, most of these countries have some of the highest costs of electricity for conventional energy and may transition to renewable energy, which has become cost competitive and is expected to be easier and a major driver, because of the high costs of traditional sources of energy.

This Special Issue attempts to address the issues related to the transition to renewable energy sources  on islands, including small island states, archipelagic countries, and off-grid areas on large islands. From up-to-date resource assessments, appropriate technologies, and systems to economic and social suitability and policy studies as well as apposite co-applications, a wholistic perspective of the current and future landscape of clean energy systems employed on island nations is to be presented. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, studies related to islands that are focused on:

  1. Techno-economic assessments;
  2. Suitability studies;
  3. Social and policy studies;
  4. Off-grid and micro-grid systems ;
  5. Hybrid renewable energy systems;
  6. Productive co-applications of renewable energy;
  7. Energy storage and conversion technologies (i.e., batteries, hydrogen, flywheel, etc.);
  8. Energy efficiency and the circular economy;
  9. Climate-resilient urban and rural energy systems;
  10. The energy–water–agriculture nexus;
  11. Smart energy systems;
  12. Negative emissions energy systems;
  13. The electrification of transportation in the islands.

This Special Issue will be highly valuable in providing additional perspectives in the study of sustainable energy technologies on islands.

Prof. Dr. Joey D. Ocon
Prof. Dr. Louis Angelo Danao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • islands
  • renewable energy
  • smart grids
  • batteries
  • hydrogen
  • off-grid systems
  • hybrid systems
  • energy–water–agriculture nexus
  • electrification
  • negative emission technologies

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

19 pages, 5010 KiB  
Article
Mapping of Suitable Sites for Concentrated Solar Power Plants in the Philippines Using Geographic Information System and Analytic Hierarchy Process
by Ana Therese A. Levosada, Renz Paolo T. Ogena, Jan Ray V. Santos and Louis Angelo M. Danao
Sustainability 2022, 14(19), 12260; https://doi.org/10.3390/su141912260 - 27 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 7013
Abstract
Solar energy is a renewable source of energy harnessed from the sun. Concentrated solar power (CSP) plants harness this energy by focusing sunlight on a limited area to heat a working fluid, which is used to generate steam and power a thermodynamic cycle [...] Read more.
Solar energy is a renewable source of energy harnessed from the sun. Concentrated solar power (CSP) plants harness this energy by focusing sunlight on a limited area to heat a working fluid, which is used to generate steam and power a thermodynamic cycle that produces electricity. There are currently no CSP plants in the Philippines, and this study aimed to locate the most suitable sites for this type of power plant. The first step was to mask out areas totally unsuitable as plant sites; we identified five exclusion factors for this: protected areas, slope, direct normal irradiance (DNI), water bodies, and land cover type. A scoring gradient was then applied to the remaining suitable areas according to seven ranking factors: DNI, slope, typhoon frequency, capacity of the nearest grid line, distance to the nearest grid line, distance to the nearest road, and distance to the nearest water body. Next, to reflect the actual degrees of influence of the factors to site suitability, we determined their relative numeric weights using analytic hierarchy process, with the weights derived from inputs from interviews with academic and industry experts. Finally, using ArcGIS Pro, we used a weighted sum of the ranking scores to produce a suitability map covering the entire Philippines. Suitable sites in the following provinces were found: Ilocos Sur, Pampanga, Mindoro, Masbate, and Maguindanao. These areas have a total area of 27.9 km2 and a projected total power output of 733 MW. Full article
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12 pages, 4053 KiB  
Article
Spatio-Temporal Solar–Wind Complementarity Assessment in the Province of Kalinga-Apayao, Philippines Using Canonical Correlation Analysis
by Karl Ezra S. Pilario, Jessa A. Ibañez, Xaviery N. Penisa, Johndel B. Obra, Carl Michael F. Odulio and Joey D. Ocon
Sustainability 2022, 14(6), 3253; https://doi.org/10.3390/su14063253 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3179
Abstract
Increased utilization of renewable energy (RE) resources is critical in achieving key climate goals by 2050. The intermittent nature of RE, especially solar and wind, however, poses reliability concerns to the utility grid. One way to address this problem is to harmonize the [...] Read more.
Increased utilization of renewable energy (RE) resources is critical in achieving key climate goals by 2050. The intermittent nature of RE, especially solar and wind, however, poses reliability concerns to the utility grid. One way to address this problem is to harmonize the RE resources using spatio-temporal complementarity analysis. Two RE resources are said to be complementary if the lack of one is balanced by the abundance of the other, and vice versa. In this work, solar–wind complementarity was analyzed across the provinces of Kalinga and Apayao, Philippines, which are potential locations for harvesting RE as suggested by the Philippine Department of Energy. Global horizontal irradiance (GHI) and wind speed data sets were obtained from the NASA POWER database and then studied using canonical correlation analysis (CCA), a multivariate statistical technique that finds maximum correlations between time series data. We modified the standard CCA to identify pairs of locations within the region of study with the highest solar–wind complementarity. Results show that the two RE resources exhibit balancing in the resulting locations. By identifying these locations, solar and wind resources in the Philippine islands can be integrated optimally and sustainably, leading to a more stable power and increased utility grid reliability. Full article
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