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Sustainable Management of Energy and Environment Based on Life Cycle Assessment

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Sustainability and Applications".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 24 June 2024 | Viewed by 1416

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Energy and Environment Institute, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
Interests: carbon dioxide removal; life cycle assessment; techno-economic assessment

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Chemical Engineering, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
Interests: carbon dioxide removal; life cycle assessment; techno-economic assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over 50Gt of anthropogenic CO2 are produced globally every year. In order to keep global temperatures to within 1.5C, we must reach net zero by 2050 through two specific levers—reduction and removal. Currently, only 40Gt of CO2 can be reduced through decarbonization. This is mainly due to difficulties in reducing emissions in hard-to-decarbonise industries such as steel, cement, chemicals, energy and power providers and infrastructure. To resolve this deficit, carbon must be removed directly from the atmosphere. The carbon dioxide removal (CDR) portfolio must therefore scale to approximately 10Gt of CO2 removal every year up until 2050. This Special Issue is dedicated to quantifying the environmental and socio-economic performance of decarbonization, as well as global CDR pathways. Original research articles and reviews are welcome. Research areas in decarbonization may include hard-to-decarbonize sectors such as:

  • Steel
  • Chemicals
  • Cement
  • Energy and power providers
  • Infrastructure and buildings
  • Transportation

Carbon dioxide removal approaches may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • CO2 mineralization
  • Ocean alkalinity enhancement
  • Soil carbon sequestration
  • Improved forest management, afforestation and reforestation
  • Coastal blue carbon
  • Biochar
  • Biomass energy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) and biomass with carbon removal and storage (BiCRS)
  • Direct air capture (DAC)
  • Geological sequestration

All forms of lifecycle assessment (Scope 3) will be considered, including detailed integrated LCA/TEA studies which can be used to determine the net removed costs of CDR. CO2 utilization is also acceptable, provided that it is based on a CDR pathway. In addition, avoided emissions studies (Scope 4) using consequential LCA, which aims to assess unforeseen carbon offset dynamics, will also be accepted in this Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Ben Kolosz
Dr. Martin Taylor
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbon dioxide removal
  • life cycle assessment
  • techno-economic assessment
  • net removed cost
  • avoided emissions

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

26 pages, 12642 KiB  
Article
Life Cycle Assessment of Carbon Capture by an Intelligent Vertical Plant Factory within an Industrial Park
by Haoyang Chen, Xue Dong, Jie Lei, Ning Zhang, Qianrui Wang, Zhiang Shi and Jinxing Yang
Sustainability 2024, 16(2), 697; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16020697 - 12 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1090
Abstract
Bio-based carbon capture and utilization emerges as a critical pathway to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial activities. Within this context, plant factories become an innovative solution for biological carbon capture within industrial parks, fed with the substantial carbon emissions [...] Read more.
Bio-based carbon capture and utilization emerges as a critical pathway to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial activities. Within this context, plant factories become an innovative solution for biological carbon capture within industrial parks, fed with the substantial carbon emissions inherent in industrial exhaust gases to maximize their carbon sequestration capabilities. Among the various plant species suitable for such plant factories, Pennisetum giganteum becomes a candidate with the best potential, characterized by its high photosynthetic efficiency (rapid growth rate), perennial feature, and significant industrial value. This paper studies the feasibility of cultivating Pennisetum giganteum within an intelligent plant factory situated in an industrial park. An automated and intelligent plant factory was designed and established, in which multiple rounds of Pennisetum giganteum cultivations were performed, and life cycle assessment (LCA) was carried out to quantitatively evaluate its carbon capture capacity. The results show that the primary carbon emission in the plant factory arises from the lighting phase, constituting 67% of carbon emissions, followed by other processes (15%) and the infrastructure (10%). The absorption of CO2 during Pennisetum giganteum growth in the plant factory effectively mitigates carbon emissions from industrial exhaust gases. The production of 1 kg of dry Pennisetum giganteum leads to a net reduction in emissions by 0.35 kg CO2 equivalent. A plant factory with dimensions of 3 m × 6 m × 2.8 m can annually reduce carbon emissions by 174 kg, with the annual carbon sequestration per unit area increased by 56% compared to open-field cultivation. Furthermore, large-scale plant factories exhibit the potential to offset the carbon emissions of entire industrial parks. These findings confirm the viability of bio-based carbon capture using intelligent plant factories, highlighting its potential for carbon capture within industrial parks. Full article
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