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Microalgal Bioprocess and Sustainability

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Resources and Sustainable Utilization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 9517

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Science and Environment, Roskilde University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark
Interests: microalgal research on physiology; bioproducts; biorefinery; biomass harvesting; CO2 sequestration; wastewater treatment
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Guest Editor
Ocean Institute, 1201 Copenhagen, Denmark
Interests: algal biomass for food, feed and biofuels; high value products; waste water treatment

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Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, B. S. Abdur Rahman Crescent Institute of Science & Technology, Chennai, Tamilnadu 600048, India
Interests: microalgal biotechnology; molecular taxonomy; bioenergy; nanocatalysts for biofuel, CO2 sequestration; wastewater treatment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue invites research or comprehensive review articles focusing on improving sustainability of microalgal bioprocesses.

Microalgae are promising feedstock for fuel and biochemicals. Sustainability is an important element that needs to be considered while developing production systems aimed at providing future bioproducts. While microalgal production systems are extensively studied, it is believed that further efforts are needed in order to improve the sustainability of the bioprocess.

We find the following research areas to be suitable for this issue that could contribute to improve the sustainability of microalgal bioprocesses:

  1. Improving biomass/biocomponent productivity;
  2. Development of biorefinery concepts;
  3. Better valorization of side stream products or residual wastes;
  4. Utilization of waste stream nutrients;
  5. Development of cost-effective downstream processes such as biomass harvesting, cell disruption and compound extraction.

In addition to the above, contributions with a focus on sustainability analysis (technoeconomic, environmental impact, etc.) of the microalgal bioprocess are also welcome.

The aim of this issue is to gather studies that could potentially contribute to the development of truly sustainable microalgal bioprocesses.

Prof. Dr. Praveen Ramasamy
Prof. Dr. Søren Laurentius Nielsen
Dr. MubarakAli Davoodbasha
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • microalgae
  • biomass
  • biofuel
  • biochemicals
  • pigments
  • biorefinery
  • harvesting
  • cell disruption
  • extraction
  • wastewater nutrients
  • sustainability
  • technoeconomic analysis
  • environmental impact analysis

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

30 pages, 1346 KiB  
Review
Cultivation and Biorefinery of Microalgae (Chlorella sp.) for Producing Biofuels and Other Byproducts: A Review
by Chiu-Mei Kuo, Yu-Ling Sun, Cheng-Han Lin, Chao-Hsu Lin, Hsi-Tien Wu and Chih-Sheng Lin
Sustainability 2021, 13(23), 13480; https://doi.org/10.3390/su132313480 - 6 Dec 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4869
Abstract
Microalgae-based carbon dioxide (CO2) biofixation and biorefinery are the most efficient methods of biological CO2 reduction and reutilization. The diversification and high-value byproducts of microalgal biomass, known as microalgae-based biorefinery, are considered the most promising platforms for the sustainable development [...] Read more.
Microalgae-based carbon dioxide (CO2) biofixation and biorefinery are the most efficient methods of biological CO2 reduction and reutilization. The diversification and high-value byproducts of microalgal biomass, known as microalgae-based biorefinery, are considered the most promising platforms for the sustainable development of energy and the environment, in addition to the improvement and integration of microalgal cultivation, scale-up, harvest, and extraction technologies. In this review, the factors influencing CO2 biofixation by microalgae, including microalgal strains, flue gas, wastewater, light, pH, temperature, and microalgae cultivation systems are summarized. Moreover, the biorefinery of Chlorella biomass for producing biofuels and its byproducts, such as fine chemicals, feed additives, and high-value products, are also discussed. The technical and economic assessments (TEAs) and life cycle assessments (LCAs) are introduced to evaluate the sustainability of microalgae CO2 fixation technology. This review provides detailed insights on the adjusted factors of microalgal cultivation to establish sustainable biological CO2 fixation technology, and the diversified applications of microalgal biomass in biorefinery. The economic and environmental sustainability, and the limitations and needs of microalgal CO2 fixation, are discussed. Finally, future research directions are provided for CO2 reduction by microalgae. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microalgal Bioprocess and Sustainability)
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15 pages, 334 KiB  
Review
A Systemic Review on Microalgal Peptides: Bioprocess and Sustainable Applications
by Raghunathan Sathya, Davoodbasha MubarakAli, Jaulikar MohamedSaalis and Jung-Wan Kim
Sustainability 2021, 13(6), 3262; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13063262 - 16 Mar 2021
Cited by 24 | Viewed by 3593
Abstract
Nowadays, microalgal research is predominantly centered on an industrial scale. In general, multipotent bioactive peptides are the advantages over focal points over utilitarian nourishment as well as nutraceuticals. Microalgal peptides are now profoundly connected with biological properties rather than nutritive. Numerous techniques are [...] Read more.
Nowadays, microalgal research is predominantly centered on an industrial scale. In general, multipotent bioactive peptides are the advantages over focal points over utilitarian nourishment as well as nutraceuticals. Microalgal peptides are now profoundly connected with biological properties rather than nutritive. Numerous techniques are employed to purify active peptides from algal protein using enzymatic hydrolysis; it is broadly used for numerous favorable circumstances. There is a chance to utilize microalgal peptides for human well-being as nutritive enhancements. This exhaustive survey details the utilization of microalgal peptides as antioxidant, anti-cancerous, anti-hypersensitive, anti-atherosclerotic, and nutritional functional foods. It is also exploring the novel technologies for the production of active peptides, for instance, the use of algal peptides as food for human health discovered restrictions, where peptides are sensitive to hydrolysis protease degradation. This review emphasizes the issue of active peptides in gastrointestinal transit, which has to be solved in the future, and prompt impacts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microalgal Bioprocess and Sustainability)
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