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Sustainable Waste Management and Recycling for Achieving a Circular Economy

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2025 | Viewed by 1920

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of International Politics and Economics, Graduate School of International Cultural Studies & Environmental Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Interests: waste plastic issues; end-of-life vehicle recycling; plastic sorter using terahertz wave; urban mining; end-of life battery; recycling cooperative behavior; integrated waste management; international resource recycling; SDGs education; disaster waste treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of International Politics and Economics, Graduate School of International Cultural Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Interests: integrated waste management using information science; environmental economics; plastic sorting using learning machine technology; recycling cooperative behavior; containers and packaging waste recycle

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of International Politics and Economics, Graduate School of International Cultural Studies, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan
Interests: recycling cooperative behavior; household solid waste management; recycling policy; recyclable resources collection; collection stations; recycling company; waste recycling; consumer behavior

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Increasing attention is currently being directed towards issues related to circular economy. These issues, which are transboundary by nature, and thus require transboundary solutions, are becoming increasingly interwoven. In the absence of sustainability, circular economy, which encompasses waste management, resource recycling, and carbon neutrality, each of which addresses a single issue, is crucial. However, these issues inevitably complicate effective resource allocation and generate conflicts. For instance, rare-metal scarcity and ocean pollution can be attributed to improper waste management and a lack of recycling technology and environmental awareness. Ocean pollution and resource nationalism have led to regional conflicts, especially in the developing world. The necessity for policy coordination at the global and local levels is indisputable, hence the establishment of sustainable waste management and recycling. Today, the diversification of waste management and recycling issues, as is true with other global issues, has clarified the roles of stakeholders.

This Special Issue considers waste management and resource recycling based on circular economy with a focus on the roles of policy, advanced technology, each actor, and the SDGs. This Special Issue calls for contributions from various cross-border academic fields, including case studies on global environmental issues, international efforts to address these issues, and policy proposals for achieving a circular economy and carbon neutrality. Specifically, this Special Issue aims to provide international organizations, governments, municipalities, private companies, citizens, and scholars with useful knowledge on how to solve circular economy issues.

Prof. Dr. Jeongsoo Yu
Dr. Kazuaki Okubo
Dr. Xiaoyue Liu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • waste management
  • circular economy
  • recycling
  • carbon-neutral
  • SDGs
  • eco-design
  • sharing
  • reuse
  • data science
  • international cooperation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

32 pages, 7379 KiB  
Article
How Indonesia’s Cities Are Grappling with Plastic Waste: An Integrated Approach towards Sustainable Plastic Waste Management
by Yunisa Zahrah, Jeongsoo Yu and Xiaoyue Liu
Sustainability 2024, 16(10), 3921; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16103921 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 695
Abstract
In Indonesia, plastic constitutes the second largest component of municipal solid waste; however, 58% remains uncollected. Most plastic recycling depends on informal sectors, accounting for only 10% of the total, leaving the remainder to potentially harm the environment. This paper analyzes how cities [...] Read more.
In Indonesia, plastic constitutes the second largest component of municipal solid waste; however, 58% remains uncollected. Most plastic recycling depends on informal sectors, accounting for only 10% of the total, leaving the remainder to potentially harm the environment. This paper analyzes how cities in Indonesia have tackled their plastic waste problems from the perspective of the integrated sustainable waste management framework. This study focuses on plastic waste management (PWM) in three cities: Bandung, Yogyakarta, and Magelang. Data were collected from 41 semi-structured interviews, a plastic waste composition data analysis, and site visits. The research outcomes include a comprehensive analysis of stakeholder roles, plastic waste flow, plastic waste composition data, and various challenges in PWM. This study identifies three main stakeholders in collecting plastic wastes: the Department of Environment as the main local government body, community-based waste banks, and private waste management companies. Most recyclable plastic waste is recovered through waste banks and private collection services. In 2022, the predominant types of plastic waste in Bandung, Yogyakarta, and Magelang City were soft plastics, thick plastics, and hard plastics, respectively. The challenges for the PWM stem from various aspects in political, legal, and institutional; environmental; financial and technical; and socio-cultural spheres. Positive trends towards an integrated system are observed, although full integration has not yet been achieved. The research recommends a multi-stakeholder cooperative approach involving municipal authorities, waste banks, and private collectors, responsive to local conditions and emphasizing sustainability aspects throughout waste management stages for a sustainable resource recycling in developing countries. Full article
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14 pages, 9151 KiB  
Article
Waste Management of Red Mud and Fly Ash to Utilize in Road Subgrade Material
by Ali Sinan Soğancı, Yavuz Yenginar, İlyas Özkan, Yusuf Güzel and Adnan Özdemir
Sustainability 2024, 16(7), 2987; https://doi.org/10.3390/su16072987 - 3 Apr 2024
Viewed by 810
Abstract
Red mud (RM) is a waste material obtained during the production of aluminum from bauxite minerals. RM causes environmental pollution due to its high alkaline properties. Therefore, RM materials are stored in waste reservoirs. As production continues, the number of required waste reservoirs [...] Read more.
Red mud (RM) is a waste material obtained during the production of aluminum from bauxite minerals. RM causes environmental pollution due to its high alkaline properties. Therefore, RM materials are stored in waste reservoirs. As production continues, the number of required waste reservoirs increases day by day. This study aims to utilize RM waste material in construction structures to contribute to the economy. The research investigates the potential use of RM waste material as road fill material. RM was improved using another waste material of fly ash (FA) since RM has low strength. Atterberg limit tests, compaction tests, unconfined compression tests, CBR tests, and SEM analyses were conducted on stabilized RM samples. In the physical properties of stabilized RM, Atterberg limits and optimum moisture content increase and density decreases since FA content increases. In the mechanical properties of stabilized RM, unconfined compressive strength, initial and secant modulus of elasticity, and California bearing ratio increase and maximum peak strain decreases since FA content and curing period increase. SEM images prove the increase in mechanical properties due to the cementation products (CSH and CAH gels) formed in the microstructure of stabilized RM. The results showed that RM waste stabilized with FA can be used as road subgrade material. Full article
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