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Treatment and Recycling of Municipal Solid Waste

A special issue of Sustainability (ISSN 2071-1050). This special issue belongs to the section "Waste and Recycling".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (16 June 2023) | Viewed by 1816

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines) Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826004, India
Interests: application of LCA; remote sensing and GIS in environmental management; municipal solid waste management; water treatment
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology (Indian School of Mines) Dhanbad, Jharkhand 826004, India
Interests: solid waste management; waste to energy; prediction modelling; life cycle assessment

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The management of rapidly increasing municipal solid waste generation is a major challenge in both rural and urban areas across the world. It is a multi-faceted issue that affects all three pillars of sustainable development, that is, environment, economic and social aspects. In order to reduce the unwanted effects of wastes on these three pillars, a sustainable solution is required. The principles of reduce, reuse, recycle as well as material and energy recovery can help in sustainable municipal solid waste management. Municipal solid waste is a mixture of several components generated from households, market and other commercial establishments. There is great potential for the recovery of materials as well as energy from municipal solid waste. However, the existing practices of municipal solid waste management are faced with many issues, such as a lack of waste reduction and segregation at source; inadequate collection, transportation and treatment facilities; and uncontrolled landfilling.

The goal of this Special Issue on “Treatment and Recycling of Municipal Solid Waste” is to support the achievement of sustainability goals at each level of the municipal solid waste management hierarchy. Waste reduction and reuse at source are considered the best options. This is followed by recycling which leads to dry material recovery and the composting of wet organic materials. The organic components of wastes that cannot be recycled should be preferred for energy recovery using biological conversion techniques based on the characteristics of wastes. Then, the waste components can be utilized for energy recovery and refuse-derived fuel (RDF) production whenever material recovery is not possible. The last and least-preferred option is landfilling
for the disposal of remaining inert materials in a safe and controlled manner.

The main purpose of this Special Issue is to bring scientific communities together with novel research works and reviews regarding the treatment and recycling of municipal solid waste for sustainable environment management. Authors are encouraged to submit case studies and research applying modeling techniques in municipal solid waste management with a scope of the possible reproducibility of results. The broad aims and scope of this Special Issue papers are:

  • Generation and characterization of municipal solid waste;
  • Reduction, reuse and recycling;
  • Life cycle assessment;
  • Energy recovery from wastes;
  • Biochemical conversion;
  • Thermochemical conversion;
  • Landfilling.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Prof. Dr. Sukha Ranjan Samadder
Dr. Atul Kumar
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sustainability is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • disposal
  • life cycle assessment
  • municipal solid waste
  • recycling
  • treatment
  • waste to energy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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11 pages, 2921 KiB  
Brief Report
Recovery of Calcium from Reaction Fly Ash
by Jian-Zhi Wang, Hsiao-Han Lin, Yi-Chin Tang and Yun-Hwei Shen
Sustainability 2023, 15(3), 2428; https://doi.org/10.3390/su15032428 - 29 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1173
Abstract
Reaction fly ash contains a large number of harmful substances, so it is usually solidified and buried in landfills. To improve the problem of insufficient landfill space, this study recovers CaOH from reaction fly ash to achieve mass and volume reduction. The leachate [...] Read more.
Reaction fly ash contains a large number of harmful substances, so it is usually solidified and buried in landfills. To improve the problem of insufficient landfill space, this study recovers CaOH from reaction fly ash to achieve mass and volume reduction. The leachate obtained by leaching the reaction fly ash with de-ionized water and 2N hydrochloric acid was used in the experiments, respectively. The volume reduction with 2N hydrochloric acid had better performance than de-ionized water, representing more than 90%. The leaching efficiency of Ca reached 21.06% with de-ionized water for 20 min at a condition of 25 °C and 7 mL/g pump density. The chemical precipitation with NaOH was conducted immediately after the completion of the leaching experiment, with a precipitation efficiency of CaOH reaching 98.55%. The leaching efficiency of Ca reached 70.26% with 2N hydrochloric acid for 30 min at a condition of 25 °C and 10 mL/g pump density. The chemical precipitation with NaOH and ion exchange with IRC748 were conducted, respectively, after the completion of the leaching experiment. After two precipitations, the precipitation efficiency of CaOH was 99.93%. The precipitation efficiency and purity of Ca after ion exchange separation were 99.90% and 98.91%, respectively. This work provided an effective approach to recover CaOH from reaction fly ash and accomplished volume reduction at the same time. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Treatment and Recycling of Municipal Solid Waste)
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