The Next Generation: Collection of the Scientific Colloquium of the Dutch Surgical Society for Medical Students (DSSMS)

A special issue of Surgeries (ISSN 2673-4095).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 4131

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departments of Surgery and Gastroenterology, Leiden University Medical Centre, 2333 ZA Leiden, The Netherlands
Interests: biomarkers; cancer; metastasis; bone healing; angiogenesis; inflammation; cell–cell interactions; proteinases; growth factors; extracellular vesicles; diagnosis; prognosis; imaging; animal models
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Guest Editor
Department of Surgery, Groene Hart Hospital, 2803 HH Gouda, The Netherlands
Interests: surgery

Special Issue Information

Dear colleagues,

Surgeries publishes articles on all aspects of surgery and provides a platform for researchers to share their findings and contribute to advancements in the field. Indispensable in such a context are the involvement and stimulation of (young) scientific talent and purposeful collaborations.

This Special Issue, entitled “The Next Generation: Collection of the Scientific Colloquium of the Dutch Surgical Society for Medical Students (DSSMS)”, is particularly unique as it features manuscripts written and submitted by medical students and PhD candidates for the Scientific Colloquium of DSSMS. Surgeries sponsored this contest in order to encourage young scientific talent in surgery through education on various aspects of clinical research.

Surgeries is proud to encourage and support the next generation of clinical researchers through publishing a selection of the manuscripts in this Special Issue. In line with the DSSMS program, a diverse range of medical topics are covered, consisting of case reports, clinical studies, and literature reviews. All submissions have undergone the standard rigorous peer review process. We thank and congratulate the organizers Roos van Heeswijk and Vincent Sier from DSMMS, as well as Joris Blok, vascular surgeon and head of the assessment committee.

We sincerely hope that this Special Issue will not only serve as a valuable contribution to science but also stimulate students and their supervisors interested in surgery-related research.

Dr. Cornelis F. M. Sier
Dr. Joris Blok
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Surgeries is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • young researchers
  • surgeries
  • dutch surgical society for medical students

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 1634 KiB  
Article
Less Is More for Non-Dislocated Femoral Neck Fractures: Similar Results for Two versus Three Cannulated Hip Screws
by Hilde Schutte, Lorenzo Hulshof, Ger van Olden, Paul van Koperen, Tim Timmers and Wouter Kluijfhout
Surgeries 2023, 4(4), 493-502; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4040048 - 22 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Cannulated hip screws (CHS) can be used for the minimally invasive fixation of non-dislocated femoral neck fractures. Usually, three screws are inserted. This study aims to determine whether fixation by two CHS leads to similar results as fixation by three CHS. Since January [...] Read more.
Cannulated hip screws (CHS) can be used for the minimally invasive fixation of non-dislocated femoral neck fractures. Usually, three screws are inserted. This study aims to determine whether fixation by two CHS leads to similar results as fixation by three CHS. Since January 2019, all patients with an indication for internal fixation by CHS were treated with two CHS and followed prospectively. Results were compared to an equal-sized control group of patients who underwent fixation by three CHS (before 2019). The primary outcome was reoperation, while the secondary outcome was screw dislocation. Since January 2019, 50 patients were treated by two CHS. Of these, 14 patients (28%) underwent reoperation versus 13 patients (26%) in the control group (p = 1.000). Reoperations included screw replacement, hemiarthroplasty, and total hip prosthesis. Three major reasons for reoperation were pain due to osteosynthesis material (n = 15), coxarthrosis (n = 4), and screw cut out (n = 3). Six weeks postoperative X-rays showed a screw dislocation of 2 mm for the two CHS group and 1 mm for the three CHS group (p = 0.330). Clinical outcomes were very similar between the groups. The overall results were good; however, the reoperation rate varied from 26 to 28%. The majority of reoperations were screw replacements. Screw dislocation seems to be more prominent in patients treated with two screws (2 mm versus 1 mm). Fixation by two cannulated hip screws is an acceptable treatment method for non-dislocated femoral neck fractures, and the insertion of a third screw does not lead to superior clinical results. Full article
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Review

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14 pages, 1965 KiB  
Review
Modulation of the Tumor Stroma and Associated Novel Nanoparticle Strategies to Enhance Tumor Targeting
by Hessel Haze, Cornelis F. M. Sier, Alexander L. Vahrmeijer and Floris A. Vuijk
Surgeries 2024, 5(1), 49-62; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries5010007 - 12 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Growth of malignant cells in solid tumors induces changes to the tumor microenvironment (TME). These changes result in promotion of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis, but also in tumor resistance to drugs and radiotherapy. The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in neo-angiogenic [...] Read more.
Growth of malignant cells in solid tumors induces changes to the tumor microenvironment (TME). These changes result in promotion of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis, but also in tumor resistance to drugs and radiotherapy. The enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect in neo-angiogenic tumor tissue enables the transport of therapeutic molecules from the circulation into the tumor, but studies show that further diffusion of these agents is often not sufficient for efficient tumor eradication. Despite the hyperpermeable vasculature facilitating the delivery of drugs and tracers, the high density of stromal cells and matrix proteins, in combination with the elevated interstitial fluid pressure in the microenvironment of solid tumors, presents a barrier which limits the delivery of compounds to the core of the tumor. Reversing the cancer-cell-induced changes to the microenvironment as well as novel nanoparticle strategies to circumvent tumor-induced stromal changes have therefore been suggested as potential methods to improve the delivery of therapeutic molecules and drug efficacy. Strategies to modulate the TME, i.e., normalization of tumor vasculature and depletion of excessive stromal proteins and cells, show promising results in enhancing delivery of therapeutic compounds. Modulation of the TME may therefore enhance the efficacy of current cancer treatments and facilitate the development of novel treatment methods as an alternative for invasive resection procedures. Full article
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Other

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13 pages, 942 KiB  
Systematic Review
Diagnostic Performance of Artificial Intelligence in Rib Fracture Detection: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Marnix C. L. van den Broek, Jorn H. Buijs, Liselotte F. M. Schmitz and Mathieu M. E. Wijffels
Surgeries 2024, 5(1), 24-36; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries5010005 - 16 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Artificial intelligence (AI) is a promising tool for diagnosing rib fractures. To date, only a few studies have quantified its performance. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the accuracy of AI as an independent tool for rib fracture detection on [...] Read more.
Artificial intelligence (AI) is a promising tool for diagnosing rib fractures. To date, only a few studies have quantified its performance. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the accuracy of AI as an independent tool for rib fracture detection on CT scans or radiographs. This was defined as the combination of sensitivity and specificity. PubMed (including MEDLINE and PubMed Central) was systematically reviewed according to the PRISMA statement followed by citation searching among studies up to December 2022. Methods of the analysis and inclusion criteria were prespecified in a protocol and published on PROSPERO (CRD42023479590). Only diagnostic studies of independent AI tools for rib fracture detection on CT scans and X-rays reporting on sensitivity and/or specificity and written in English were included. Twelve studies met these criteria, which included 11,510 rib fractures in total. A quality assessment was performed using an altered version of QUADAS-2. Random-effects meta-analyses were performed on the included data. If specificity was not reported, it was calculated on a set of assumptions. Pooled sensitivity and specificity were 0.85 (95% CI, 0.78–0.92) and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94–0.97), respectively. None of the included studies used X-rays. Thus, it can be concluded that AI is accurate in detecting rib fractures on CT scans. Overall, these findings seemed quite robust, as can be concluded from the study quality assessment, therefore AI could potentially play a substantial role in the future of radiological diagnostics. Full article
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18 pages, 1246 KiB  
Systematic Review
Myosteatosis as a Prognostic Marker for Postoperative Mortality in Adult Patients Undergoing Surgery in General—A Systematic Review
by Onno Emanuel den Os, Rosalie Nielen and Elham Bidar
Surgeries 2023, 4(4), 647-664; https://doi.org/10.3390/surgeries4040062 - 29 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Background: Assessing frailty is important in treating surgical patients to predict peri- and postoperative events like complications or mortality. The current standard is not optimal; therefore, new prognostic markers are being evaluated to enrich the current frailty assessment. One of these new markers [...] Read more.
Background: Assessing frailty is important in treating surgical patients to predict peri- and postoperative events like complications or mortality. The current standard is not optimal; therefore, new prognostic markers are being evaluated to enrich the current frailty assessment. One of these new markers is fat degeneration of the psoas muscle (myosteatosis). This can be assessed by measuring the psoas muscle density (PMD) with computed tomography (CT). The aim of this review is to investigate PMD, and, thus, myosteatosis, as a prognostic marker for postoperative mortality in adult patients undergoing general surgery. Methods: An electronic search was performed in PubMed to identify relevant studies associating PMD with postoperative mortality. The looked-upon period for mortality to occur did not matter for this review. The looked-upon outcome measure for this review was the hazard ratio. Results: From 659 potential articles from PubMed, 12 were included, for a total of 4834 participants. Articles were excluded when not focused on PMD, if the type of intervention was not specified, and when imaging other than with CT on the level of the third vertebra was performed. The included articles were assessed for bias with the Newcastle–Ottawa Scale (NOS). PMD was, after multivariable analyses, identified as an independent significant prognostic marker for several surgical cardiovascular interventions when we looked at the 5-year mortality rate and for fenestrated branched endovascular aortic repair (F-BEVAR) a slight significant protective correlation between postoperative mortality and PMD (when divided by psoas muscle area (PMI)) when we looked at the 30-day and 3-year mortality. Also, PMD was identified as an independent significant prognostic marker for a variety of surgical gastrointestinal interventions when we looked at 30-day/90-day/1-year/3-year/5-year mortality. PMD was not identified as a significant prognostic marker in urologic surgery. Conclusion: Myosteatosis has the potential to be a valuable contribution to the current frailty assessment for patients undergoing cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, or urologic surgery. However, more research must be conducted to further strengthen the prognostic value of myosteatosis, with special attention to, e.g., gender- or age-specific interpretations of the results. Full article
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