Microbiome: A Tool for Plant Stress Management in Future Production Systems

A special issue of Stresses (ISSN 2673-7140). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant and Photoautotrophic Stresses".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 8947

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Bashan Institute of Sciences, 1730 Post Oak Ct, Auburn, AL 36830, USA
Interests: plant–bacteria interaction; microbial inoculants; plant growth promoting bacteria; microbial-assisted restoration of degraded soils
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Guest Editor
Department of Forest Mycology and Plant Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-75007 Uppsala, Sweden
Interests: deciphering plant–microbe interactions; construction of genome-scale metabolic models of microorganisms and plants; extremophilic microorganisms and their biochemical adaptation and biotechnological

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

This Special Issue aims to gather transdisciplinary contributions with innovative research, methodological proposals, and research ideas on sustainable cultivation/production systems.

We focus on unraveling the interactions, and designing cultivation systems, where the crop plant breeding lines are cultivated along with their rhizosphere components. In order to achieve this, we must “learn” from the rhizospheres, which have assisted landraces and crops’ wild relatives in surviving under various stress situations. We use next-generation sequencing combined with high-resolution microscopy and metabolomic approaches, as well as nanointerface studies to expand the potential of modern plant-breeding lines. Sustainable production system issues are critical in regions where the effects of climate change have created severe stress conditions (e.g., the Global South), but also in the Global North where artificial fertilization has resulted in agricultural pollution and crop nutritional stress.  

For this Special Issue, we seek the submission of regular research papers, communications, short notes, and reviews with research proposals.

Dr. Luz E. de-Bashan
Dr. Salme Timmusk
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Stresses is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Editorial

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3 pages, 190 KiB  
Editorial
Microbiome: A Tool for Plant Stress Management in Future Production Systems
by Salme Timmusk and Luz E. de-Bashan
Stresses 2022, 2(2), 210-212; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses2020014 - 6 Apr 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1894
Abstract
Climate change, due to the altered composition of the global atmosphere from the “greenhouse effect”, is one of the biggest challenges to agricultural production systems [...] Full article

Research

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20 pages, 2090 KiB  
Article
Engineering Approach for Production of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Inoculum Adapted to Saline Soil Management
by Karima Bencherif, Frederic Laruelle, Benoit Tisserant, Yolande Dalpé and Anissa Lounés-Hadj Sahraoui
Stresses 2023, 3(2), 404-423; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses3020030 - 4 Apr 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1784
Abstract
(1) Background: Soil salinity impacts plant growth and productivity in steppic regions. Thus, the current study aims at producing, at low cost, an inoculum composed of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) strains adapted to saline soil management. (2) Methods: The propagation of the [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Soil salinity impacts plant growth and productivity in steppic regions. Thus, the current study aims at producing, at low cost, an inoculum composed of native arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) strains adapted to saline soil management. (2) Methods: The propagation of the native AMF strains was carried out in three natural saline soils presenting increasing salinity levels (4.5, 8.5 and 9.3 dS·m−1 in Boughzoul (BG), Salt Rocket (SR) and Zaafrane (ZA) sites, respectively). Three host plant species (alfalfa, clover and leek) were tested as trap cultures. AMF spore richness and diversity, the quantification of soil microbial biomass and the determination of the most probable number (MPN) were carried out before and after 24 months culture. Moreover, the mycorrhizal rates of the host plant species were assessed. (3) Results: The moderate saline soil (SR) planted with alfalfa was found to be the most suitable for AMF inoculum production with a maximum of 650 spores, 10 g−1 of soil, a mycorrhizal rate of 86%, 70 propagules·g−1 of soil and the highest microbial biomass content. (4) Conclusion: This study points out the best combination for the production of a more adapted AMF biofertilizer for saline soil management and proposes several indicators for biofertilizer quality evaluation. Full article
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17 pages, 3368 KiB  
Article
Productivity and Nutrient Quality of Lemna minor as Affected by Microbiome, CO2 Level, and Nutrient Supply
by Madeleine C. Zenir, Marina López-Pozo, Stephanie K. Polutchko, Jared J. Stewart, William W. Adams III, Adam Escobar and Barbara Demmig-Adams
Stresses 2023, 3(1), 69-85; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses3010007 - 31 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2757
Abstract
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can impact plant photosynthesis and productivity and threaten food security, especially when combined with additional environmental stressors. This study addresses the effects of elevated CO2 in combination with low nutrient supply on Lemna minor [...] Read more.
Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can impact plant photosynthesis and productivity and threaten food security, especially when combined with additional environmental stressors. This study addresses the effects of elevated CO2 in combination with low nutrient supply on Lemna minor (common duckweed). We quantified plant growth rate and nutritional quality (protein content) and evaluated whether any adverse effects of elevated CO2, low nutrients, or the combination of the two could be mitigated by plant-microbe interaction. Plants were grown under controlled conditions and were either uninoculated or inoculated with microorganisms from a local pond that supported L. minor populations. Under low nutrients in combination with high CO2, growth (plant area expansion rate) decreased and biomass accumulation increased, albeit with lower nutritional quality (lower percentage of protein per plant biomass). Inoculation with plant-associated microorganisms restored area expansion rate and further stimulated biomass accumulation while supporting a high protein-to-biomass ratio and, thus, a high nutritional quality. These findings indicate that plant-microbe interaction can support a higher nutritional quality of plant biomass under elevated atmospheric CO2 levels, an important finding for both human and non-human consumers during a time of rapid environmental change. Full article
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Review

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26 pages, 3827 KiB  
Review
Regulation, Biosynthesis, and Extraction of Bacillus-Derived Lipopeptides and Its Implications in Biological Control of Phytopathogens
by Valeria Valenzuela Ruiz, Azucena Gándara-Ledezma, María Fernanda Villarreal-Delgado, Eber Daniel Villa-Rodríguez, Fannie Isela Parra-Cota, Gustavo Santoyo, Lorena Jacqueline Gómez-Godínez, Luis A. Cira Chávez and Sergio de los Santos-Villalobos
Stresses 2024, 4(1), 107-132; https://doi.org/10.3390/stresses4010007 - 16 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1526
Abstract
In recent years, the adoption of sustainable pest management strategies has increased interest in the utilization of biopesticides, with a focus on harnessing beneficial microorganisms. Among these, lipopeptides, such as surfactins, iturins, and fengycins produced by the genus Bacillus, have gained significant [...] Read more.
In recent years, the adoption of sustainable pest management strategies has increased interest in the utilization of biopesticides, with a focus on harnessing beneficial microorganisms. Among these, lipopeptides, such as surfactins, iturins, and fengycins produced by the genus Bacillus, have gained significant attention due to their multifaceted biocontrol mechanisms and wide-ranging inhibitory effects. This review aims to address the regulation, biosynthesis, and production of three main lipopeptide families secreted by the genus Bacillus, as well as the identification and quantification analysis used to date, through the omic tools approach. The three families have been identified as key contributors to the biocontrol abilities of these bacteria, with their broad-spectrum activity making them valuable tools in integrated pest management approaches that aim to reduce reliance on chemical pesticides use while maintaining crop health and productivity. Full article
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