Catalyzing Change: Social Love, Emotions and Transformations of Social Relationships

A special issue of Social Sciences (ISSN 2076-0760).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2024 | Viewed by 3760

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Departments of Political and Social Studies, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: agape; social love; emotion

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departments of Political and Social Studies, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: emotion; empathy; embodiment

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Departments of Political and Social Studies, University of Salerno, 84084 Fisciano, Italy
Interests: political science; social network; ethnography

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Social love is a broad and multifaceted concept that encompasses the various means by which human ties and connections are fostered within a community or society. As a concept that comprises several elements, social love includes the following themes: (a) empathy and solidarity, involving the ability to feel the same emotions as others and to offer support in situations of need, which then translates into gestures of help and support toward other members in a community; (b) social cohesion, which indicates the strength of ties within a group or community and results in the fostering of cooperation, mutual trust and a sense of belonging—ultimately contributing to the overall well-being and resilience of a society; (c) meaningful interpersonal relationships that are represented by deep and authentic bonds between individuals, which exceed mere superficial acquaintance and are characterized by trust, emotional intimacy and mutual support; and (d) altruism and volunteerism, manifested through altruistic and voluntary actions, in which people devote time and resources to the welfare of others without the expectation of charity in return.

In essence, social love centers on the quality of human relationships, solidarity and commitment to the welfare of both others and the community as a whole. The implementation of this concept could profoundly affect the dynamics of electoral campaigns, political participation, the mobilization of supporters and the formation of public opinion. Hence, it is a crucial element in the formation of more inclusive, empathetic and resilient societies. Given its multipurpose nature, articles ranging from positional papers to research papers centered on the following topics will be welcome within this Special Issue:

  • Emotions and social interaction;
  • Empathy and prosocial behavior;
  • Emotions and education;
  • Emotions and politics;
  • Institutions and social services;
  • Identities and biographies;
  • Social love in the management of public services;
  • Emotions, processes, and educational policies;
  • Social interactions;
  • Urban interaction and ecology;
  • Migration and social services;
  • Empathy, work, employment and organization;
  • Emotionality and social research;
  • Emotionality and artificial intelligences;
  • Social and digital love;
  • The influence of digital platforms.

Please submit your proposals and any questions to Special Issue editors by 15 January 2024. Notification of acceptance will be provided by 31 January 2024. Final papers are due on 1 August 2024 for peer review.

Proposals should be one page in length and include a title, an abstract explaining its relevance to the Special Issue topic, a description of the population, and the methods used (if applicable). Also, include author names and affiliations.

Prof. Dr. Gennaro Iorio
Dr. Vincenzo Auriemma
Dr. Daniele Battista
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Social Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • emotion
  • social love
  • political emotion
  • empathy
  • solidarity
  • social inclusion

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 560 KiB  
Article
Attachment Styles, Vulnerable Narcissism, Emotion Dysregulation and Perceived Social Support: A Mediation Model
by Valeria Saladino, Francesca Cuzzocrea, Danilo Calaresi, Janine Gullo and Valeria Verrastro
Soc. Sci. 2024, 13(5), 231; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci13050231 - 24 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Attachment styles have been shown to significantly influence individuals’ social and emotional functioning. Furthermore, vulnerable narcissism and emotion dysregulation are both relevant factors to consider in understanding individuals’ social interactions and support networks. However, the mechanisms underlying such relationships are not fully understood [...] Read more.
Attachment styles have been shown to significantly influence individuals’ social and emotional functioning. Furthermore, vulnerable narcissism and emotion dysregulation are both relevant factors to consider in understanding individuals’ social interactions and support networks. However, the mechanisms underlying such relationships are not fully understood yet. The objective of this research was to assess whether vulnerable narcissism and emotion dysregulation sequentially mediate the connection between different attachment styles and perceived social support. Self-report questionnaires were administered to a sample of 1260 emerging adults (50% women) aged 18–25. Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) and Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) were conducted. Preliminary analyses indicated significant effects of gender on some study variables, thus gender was controlled in the mediation analyses. The findings indicated that there was no mediation for secure attachment, full mediation for dismissing and preoccupied attachment, and partial mediation for fearful attachment. The results suggest that addressing vulnerable narcissism and emotion dysregulation may be crucial in promoting individuals’ perceived social support, particularly for those with insecure attachment styles. Furthermore, the findings emphasize the need for personalized approaches, as interventions may need to be tailored to individuals’ unique attachment styles. Full article
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14 pages, 1622 KiB  
Article
Gender Diversity: An Opportunity for Socially Inclusive Human Resource Management Policies for Organizational Sustainability
by Caterina Galdiero, Cecilia Maltempo, Rosario Marrapodi and Marcello Martinez
Soc. Sci. 2024, 13(3), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci13030173 - 18 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1107
Abstract
The context in which work is distributed, organized, and performed has certainly changed in recent decades. In recent years, shock events such as COVID-19 have contributed to the revision of human resource management (HRM) dynamics, which was previously for “standard work”. Overall, hybrid [...] Read more.
The context in which work is distributed, organized, and performed has certainly changed in recent decades. In recent years, shock events such as COVID-19 have contributed to the revision of human resource management (HRM) dynamics, which was previously for “standard work”. Overall, hybrid work is not a novelty but has significantly expanded, particularly in the post-COVID-19 period, creating new opportunities in human resource management, especially for female employees, who often manifest the need to reconcile family and work. The new post-pandemic situation has paved the way for gender sustainability processes in organizations by pushing towards a more general organizational sustainability. In fact, in recent decades, sustainability in companies has ceased to be merely environmental and has expanded its boundaries to a “sustainable” business model, whereby human resource management must also meet organizational sustainability criteria. The literature shows that women add value to organizations. Therefore, companies that take on the implementation of management policies with the aim of gender inclusion are committed to social and organizational sustainability, which leads to strategic ideas of competitive advantages. Starting from these considerations, the main purpose of this paper is to compare several strands of research on organizational sustainability and diversity management using an integrative literature review method that offers the opportunity to discover areas where further research is needed. This allows fields of study to be mapped. This paper, derived from a review, provides insights for line managers and upper management regarding pursuing sustainability goals within organizations’ boundaries. Limitations and potential future research directions are also discussed, contributing to the ongoing development of research on these subjects. Full article
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9 pages, 218 KiB  
Essay
New Forms of Interaction in the Digital Age: The Use of the Telephone
by Angelo Romeo
Soc. Sci. 2024, 13(3), 153; https://doi.org/10.3390/socsci13030153 - 7 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The objective of this article is to analyze how the digital space has become a ground for encounters, comparisons, and sometimes even clashes among individuals who increasingly inhabit the Internet, not just as a gateway to consume products, but as a context in [...] Read more.
The objective of this article is to analyze how the digital space has become a ground for encounters, comparisons, and sometimes even clashes among individuals who increasingly inhabit the Internet, not just as a gateway to consume products, but as a context in which to weave relationships that, in the era of the Metaverse, are no longer to be understood as opposed to face-to-face encounters but rather as a continuation that transcends space–time boundaries. The Internet has become a place where relationships can be formed in various ways, influencing daily life and individual as well as collective existence. This influence now extends across various realms, from recreational encounters to cultural exchanges, and from politics to social interactions. The focus of this article is to analyze relational transformations and consequently how each individual relates to the Internet, both within and outside digital circuits. A state-of-the-art review of digital studies primarily interested in issues related to identity, increasingly showcased on social media, aims to understand how relationships and interactions can be interpreted today. These interactions occur within the screens of devices, disrupting certain stages of each individual’s biographical experience. Knowledge often begins in digital contexts and does not necessarily translate into the “tangible” everyday life, to the extent that the term “Digital Society” no longer surprises but is part of routine language. The synergy between digital and physical spaces calls on the social sciences to carefully analyze the types of relationships we build and how we nurture them amid applications and platforms. Thus, this article explores what friendships and romantic relationships have become in this digital era. It delves into the role of individuals faced with this rapid influx of technology into contemporary society. What is the role of the person in navigating this technological excess? The article aims to shed light on these questions, emphasizing notions such as relationships, identity, complexity, and the individual. Full article
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