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RFID-Based Sensors

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Electronic Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 January 2024) | Viewed by 8454

Special Issue Editors

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155‎, USA
Interests: flexible bioelectronics; biomedical microdevices; biomedical circuits and systems; micro and nano fabrication; lab-on-chip microsystems; global health and precision medicine; CMOS image sensors for scientific imaging; analog to information converters; active metamaterial devices; circuits; and systems; terahertz devices and circuits
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155, USA
Interests: analog; mixed signal; sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

RFID tags are widely used for the tracking and identification of items. A passive RFID tag, consisting of a small low-profile antenna and an RFID chip, receives energy from a nearby RFID reader and responds by sending its unique ID information back to the reader. There has been a growing trend to leverage low-cost, lightweight RFID tags for various sensing applications in addition to their conventional role of identification and tracking. This Special Issue aims to publish works discussing low-cost RFID-based sensors for sensing, measuring, and recording various parameters. How to integrate different sensors into the RFID tag on a compact platform is the research challenge.There are many potential topics, including but not limited to:

  • Light sensing;
  • Tilt sensing;
  • Strain sensing;
  • Security sensing;
  • Chemical sensing;
  • Biology sensing;
  • Humidity sensing;
  • Wood sensing;
  • Food quality sensing;
  • Smoke sensing.

Prof. Dr. Sameer Sonkusale
Dr. Wei Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • RFID
  • battery-less
  • sensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 12526 KiB  
Communication
A Feasibility Study on Monitoring Earthquake-Caused Furniture Vibrations Using Radiofrequency Identification Sensor Tags
Sensors 2023, 23(6), 3279; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23063279 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1579
Abstract
This paper presents a feasibility study on monitoring earthquake-caused furniture vibrations using radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags. Finding unstable objects by exploiting the vibrations caused by weaker earthquakes is effective as one of the potential countermeasures for large-scale earthquakes in earthquake-prone areas. For [...] Read more.
This paper presents a feasibility study on monitoring earthquake-caused furniture vibrations using radiofrequency identification (RFID) sensor tags. Finding unstable objects by exploiting the vibrations caused by weaker earthquakes is effective as one of the potential countermeasures for large-scale earthquakes in earthquake-prone areas. For this purpose, a previously proposed ultrahigh-frequency (UHF)-band RFID-based batteryless vibration/physical shock sensing system enabled long-term monitoring. This RFID sensor system introduced standby and active modes for long-term monitoring. This system enabled lower-cost wireless vibration measurements without affecting the vibration of furniture because the RFID-based sensor tags provide lightweight, low-cost, and battery-free operations. This RFID sensor system observed earthquake-cased furniture vibrations in a room on the fourth floor of a building eight stories high at Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Ibaraki, Japan. The observation results revealed that the RFID sensor tags identified the vibrations of furniture caused by earthquakes. The RFID sensor system also observed the vibration duration times of the objects in a room and specified the most unstable reference object. Hence, the proposed vibration sensing system helped achieve safe living in indoor environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RFID-Based Sensors)
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9 pages, 1357 KiB  
Article
Environmental Burden Case Study of RFID Technology in Logistics Centre
Sensors 2023, 23(3), 1268; https://doi.org/10.3390/s23031268 - 22 Jan 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2174
Abstract
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has established itself as an effective tool for identifying various objects in all human and business areas. There are many studies describing the use of this technology. However, scientific articles only marginally address the issue of recycling or [...] Read more.
Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology has established itself as an effective tool for identifying various objects in all human and business areas. There are many studies describing the use of this technology. However, scientific articles only marginally address the issue of recycling or reusing radio frequency identifiers. Radio frequency identifiers are defined as electronic waste by European Union legislation. This article deals with the environmental burden resulting from the use of radio frequency identifiers in a selected logistics centre and courier company in the Slovak and Czech Republic territories. The research and its relevance have become topical in the context of pandemics and with the increasing demand for products and courier services. In order to access the level of the above-mentioned environmental burden in a relevant way, an analysis of the circulation of transport units (pallets) and radio frequency identifiers in the selected logistics centre was carried out. The research results showed that the selected logistics centre generated annually 5.7 t of the e-waste from radio frequency identifiers placed on received pallets. The amount of 139 kg of metal was present in the e-waste quantity. The partial results of the research were applied to the e-commerce area. This article’s conclusion is dedicated to the characterization of possibilities of reducing the environmental burden from the use of radio frequency identifiers in logistics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RFID-Based Sensors)
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Review

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16 pages, 1176 KiB  
Review
From Identification to Sensing: RFID Is One of the Key Technologies in the IoT Field
Sensors 2022, 22(19), 7523; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22197523 - 04 Oct 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3271
Abstract
RFID (radio frequency identification) technology appeared nearly 70 years ago. Deployed more widely only from the early 2000s, it is now booming and its development is still accelerating. As its name indicates, its original function was the identification (of objects, animals, people) and [...] Read more.
RFID (radio frequency identification) technology appeared nearly 70 years ago. Deployed more widely only from the early 2000s, it is now booming and its development is still accelerating. As its name indicates, its original function was the identification (of objects, animals, people) and its applications were then essentially aimed at traceability, access control and logistics. If this type of use is still relevant today with more and more new application contexts and more and more efficient RFID tags, RFID has also evolved by integrating new capabilities. These new tags, known as augmented tags, include an information capture function. With the explosion of connected objects and the emergence of the Internet of Things (IoT), this old technology that is RFID still has a promising future and will probably be more and more present in our private and professional environments in all fields: logistics, industry, agriculture, building, health and even space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue RFID-Based Sensors)
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