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Sensors and Sensor Systems for Atmospheric and Environmental Pollution Monitoring

A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220). This special issue belongs to the section "Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2024 | Viewed by 2448

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Institute of Atmospheric Pollution Research, National Research Council of Italy, 00015 Monterotondo, Italy
Interests: sensors; nanomaterials; electronic; pollution; QCM; acoustic sensor
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue on “Sensors and Sensor Systems for Atmospheric and Environmental Pollution Monitoring” aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the latest research trends, technologies, and applications in the field of pollution monitoring. The continuous growth in human activities has led to an alarming increase in pollution, which poses significant health risks to humans and the environment. Sensors and sensor systems have emerged as a valuable tool for real-time environmental pollution, for example, in air pollution monitoring and enabling the accurate identification and tracking of pollutants such as particulate matter, NOx, SO2, and many others. In land or soil monitoring, sensors are able to assess and measures concentrations of chemicals such as persistent organic pollutants. This Special Issue will cover a wide range of topics related to atmospheric and environmental pollution monitoring, including novel sensor fabrication techniques, signal processing and data analysis methods, wireless communication protocols, and application case studies.

Contributions are welcome from both academia and industry to offer a platform for interdisciplinary discussions and collaborations that can lead to innovative solutions to tackle the challenges posed by air pollution. We hope this Special Issue will serve as a valuable reference for researchers and engineers who are working towards improving the quality of our air and protecting public health.

Dr. Emiliano Zampetti
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Sensors is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chemical sensors
  • physical sensors
  • chemical sensor array
  • electronic nose
  • smart sensors
  • sensor networks
  • wireless sensors
  • materials for chemical sensors
  • sensors for soil contaminants
  • sensors for environmental disaster

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1606 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Sub-Ppm Instrument Response Suggests Higher Detection Limits Could Be Used to Quantify Methane Emissions from Oil and Gas Infrastructure
by Stuart N. Riddick, Mercy Mbua, Ryan Brouwer, Ethan W. Emerson, Abhinav Anand, Elijah Kiplimo, Seunfunmi Ojomu, Jui-Hsiang Lo and Daniel J. Zimmerle
Sensors 2024, 24(11), 3407; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24113407 - 25 May 2024
Viewed by 335
Abstract
Quantifying and controlling fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas facilities remains essential for addressing climate goals, but the costs associated with monitoring millions of production sites remain prohibitively expensive. Current thinking, supported by measurement and simple dispersion modelling, assumes single-digit parts-per-million instrumentation [...] Read more.
Quantifying and controlling fugitive methane emissions from oil and gas facilities remains essential for addressing climate goals, but the costs associated with monitoring millions of production sites remain prohibitively expensive. Current thinking, supported by measurement and simple dispersion modelling, assumes single-digit parts-per-million instrumentation is required. To investigate instrument response, the inlets of three trace-methane (sub-ppm) analyzers were collocated on a facility designed to release gas of known composition at known flow rates between 0.4 and 5.2 kg CH4 h−1 from simulated oil and gas infrastructure. Methane mixing ratios were measured by each instrument at 1 Hertz resolution over nine hours. While mixing ratios reported by a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS)-based instrument were on average 10.0 ppm (range 1.8 to 83 ppm), a mid-infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (MIRA)-based instrument reported short-lived mixing ratios far larger than expected (range 1.8 to 779 ppm) with a similar nine-hour average to the CRDS (10.1 ppm). We suggest the peaks detected by the MIRA are likely caused by a micrometeorological phenomenon, where vortex shedding has resulted in heterogeneous methane plumes which only the MIRA can observe. Further analysis suggests an instrument like the MIRA (an optical-cavity-based instrument with cavity size ≤10 cm3 measuring at ≥2 Hz with air flow rates in the order of ≤0.3 slpm at distances of ≤20 m from the source) but with a higher detection limit (25 ppm) could detect enough of the high-concentration events to generate representative 20 min-average methane mixing ratios. Even though development of a lower-cost, high-precision, high-accuracy instrument with a 25 ppm detection threshold remains a significant problem, this has implications for the use of instrumentation with higher detection thresholds, resulting in the reduction in cost to measure methane emissions and providing a mechanism for the widespread deployment of effective leak detection and repair programs for all oil and gas infrastructure. Full article
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17 pages, 6108 KiB  
Article
A Long-Term Comparison between the AethLabs MA350 and Aerosol Magee Scientific AE33 Black Carbon Monitors in the Greater Salt Lake City Metropolitan Area
by Daniel L. Mendoza, L. Drew Hill, Jeffrey Blair and Erik T. Crosman
Sensors 2024, 24(3), 965; https://doi.org/10.3390/s24030965 - 1 Feb 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1507
Abstract
Black carbon (BC) or soot contains ultrafine combustion particles that are associated with a wide range of health impacts, leading to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Both long-term and short-term health impacts of BC have been documented, with even low-level exposures to BC resulting [...] Read more.
Black carbon (BC) or soot contains ultrafine combustion particles that are associated with a wide range of health impacts, leading to respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Both long-term and short-term health impacts of BC have been documented, with even low-level exposures to BC resulting in negative health outcomes for vulnerable groups. Two aethalometers—AethLabs MA350 and Aerosol Magee Scientific AE33—were co-located at a Utah Division of Air Quality site in Bountiful, Utah for just under a year. The aethalometer comparison showed a close relationship between instruments for IR BC, Blue BC, and fossil fuel source-specific BC estimates. The biomass source-specific BC estimates were markedly different between instruments at the minute and hour scale but became more similar and perhaps less-affected by high-leverage outliers at the daily time scale. The greater inter-device difference for biomass BC may have been confounded by very low biomass-specific BC concentrations during the study period. These findings at a mountainous, high-elevation, Greater Salt Lake City Area site support previous study results and broaden the body of evidence validating the performance of the MA350. Full article
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