Bioinformatic Approaches to Understand Skeletal Muscle Adaptation

A special issue of Physiologia (ISSN 2673-9488).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 April 2023) | Viewed by 2486

Special Issue Editors

Department of Laboratory Medicine, Division of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, and Unit of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
Interests: integrative physiology; skeletal muscle; spaceflight; bed rest; microgravity; exercise; training
Department of Sport and Health Sciences, College of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, St. Luke’s Campus, Exeter EX1 2LU, UK
Interests: skeletal muscle; exercise; disuse; nutrition; ageing; spaceflight; omics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skeletal muscle demonstrates remarkable remodelling, displaying hypertrophy in response to loading (e.g., exercise) and atrophy in response to unloading (e.g., disuse, spaceflight), ageing and/or disease. While reductionist analyses (e.g., PCR) have been invaluable for identifying key molecular regulators of atrophy/hypertrophy, phenotypic adaptations arise from highly coordinated and diverse molecular signals and, thus, cannot be fully explained on the basis of single molecular changes. The application of omics (e.g., transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics) offers a judicious approach that overcomes the limitations of reductionist methods by permitting global analysis, in which thousands of molecules are identified. Subsequent application of sophisticated informatic pipelines can identify and quantitively link molecular targets and molecular networks to physiological outcomes, thereby holding great promise to expedite our systems-level understanding of muscle atrophy/hypertrophy.

Thus, the aim of this Special Issue is to highlight the utilisation and application of -omic and/or informatic approaches for revealing the molecular regulation of muscle adaptation. We encourage the submission of original research articles, reviews and -omic meta-analyses on this topic.

Dr. Rodrigo Fernandez-Gonzalo
Dr. Colleen S. Deane
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • skeletal muscle
  • omics
  • informatics
  • atrophy
  • hypertrophy

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

16 pages, 723 KiB  
Review
RNA-Sequencing Muscle Plasticity to Resistance Exercise Training and Disuse in Youth and Older Age
Physiologia 2022, 2(4), 164-179; https://doi.org/10.3390/physiologia2040014 - 07 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1752
Abstract
Maintenance of skeletal muscle mass and function is critical to health and wellbeing throughout the lifespan. However, disuse through reduced physical activity (e.g., sedentarism), immobilisation, bed rest or microgravity has significant adverse effects on skeletal muscle health. Conversely, resistance exercise training (RET) induces [...] Read more.
Maintenance of skeletal muscle mass and function is critical to health and wellbeing throughout the lifespan. However, disuse through reduced physical activity (e.g., sedentarism), immobilisation, bed rest or microgravity has significant adverse effects on skeletal muscle health. Conversely, resistance exercise training (RET) induces positive muscle mass and strength adaptations. Several studies have employed microarray technology to understand the transcriptional basis of muscle atrophy and hypertrophy after disuse and RET, respectively, to devise fully effective therapeutic interventions. More recently, rapidly falling costs have seen RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) increasingly applied in exploring muscle adaptations to RET and disuse. The aim of this review is to summarise the transcriptional responses to RET or disuse measured via RNA-seq in young and older adults. We also highlight analytical considerations to maximise the utility of RNA-seq in the context of skeletal muscle research. The limited number of muscle transcriptional signatures obtained thus far with RNA-seq are generally consistent with those obtained with microarrays. However, RNA-seq may provide additional molecular insight, particularly when combined with data-driven approaches such as correlation network analyses. In this context, it is essential to consider the most appropriate study design parameters as well as bioinformatic and statistical approaches. This will facilitate the use of RNA-seq to better understand the transcriptional regulators of skeletal muscle plasticity in response to increased or decreased use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioinformatic Approaches to Understand Skeletal Muscle Adaptation)
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