The Pharmacological Management of Bone and Muscle Disorders

A special issue of Pharmaceuticals (ISSN 1424-8247). This special issue belongs to the section "Pharmacology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 March 2024 | Viewed by 1724

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Research for Food Safety and Health (IRC-FSH), Department of Health Sciences, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, 88100 Catanzaro, Italy
Interests: muscle; bone; osteosarcopenia; nutraceuticals; skeletal muscle metabolism; muscle atrophy treatment; osteoporosis treatment
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Skeletal muscles are dynamic tissues capable of adapting in response to a variety of signals. Skeletal muscles experience mass changes as a result of physical activity, metabolism, and hormones. Atrophy is defined as a decrease in the size of a tissue or organ due to a decrease in cell size caused by the loss of organelles, cytoplasm, and proteins. This complex process occurs in skeletal muscle as a consequence of a variety of stressors, including neural inactivity, mechanical unloading, inflammation, metabolic stress, and elevated glucocorticoid levels. Muscle mass, in turn, depends on protein turnover. Muscle atrophy occurs when the rate of protein degradation exceeds that of protein synthesis.  

The integrity of bone tissue is also maintained by a delicate balance between bone resorption (by osteoclasts) and bone formation (by osteoblasts). During physiological aging or pathology, this balance is altered, and pharmacological treatment must be carried out in an attempt to restore the balance. Drugs capable of restoring this balance are valuable for the treatment of pathologies such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, rheumatoid arthritis, or periodontal disease.

Much less attention has been paid to promoting bone formation with, for example, growth factors or hormones, an approach that would represent a valuable adjunctive therapy for patients receiving bone resorption inhibitors.

This Special Issue of Pharmaceuticals, entitled “The Pharmacological Management of Bone and Muscle Disorders”, focuses on the pharmacological treatment of bone and muscle diseases and will therefore cover recent advances in the treatment of such diseases, including muscle atrophy, osteoporosis, and osteosarcopenia.

This Special Issue aims to collect articles that will further our understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in bone and muscle disorders and the potential of their associated drugs, natural products, growth factors, and hormones. Topics of interest include the development and characterization of novel pharmaceutical approaches. Experimental papers and review articles are both welcome.

Dr. Francesca Bosco
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • muscle
  • bone
  • osteosarcopenia
  • nutraceuticals
  • skeletal muscle metabolism
  • pharmacological management

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 9134 KiB  
Article
Traditional Chinese Medicine for Topical Treatment of Skeletal Muscle Injury
Pharmaceuticals 2023, 16(8), 1144; https://doi.org/10.3390/ph16081144 - 12 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1414
Abstract
Muscle injuries are common musculoskeletal problems, but the pharmaceutical agent for muscle repair and healing is insufficient. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) frequently uses topical treatments to treat muscle injuries, although scientific evidence supporting their efficacy is scarce. In this study, an in vitro [...] Read more.
Muscle injuries are common musculoskeletal problems, but the pharmaceutical agent for muscle repair and healing is insufficient. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) frequently uses topical treatments to treat muscle injuries, although scientific evidence supporting their efficacy is scarce. In this study, an in vitro assay was used to test the cytotoxicity of a topical TCM formula containing Carthami Flos, Dipsaci Radix, and Rhei Rhizoma (CDR). Then, a muscle contusion rat model was developed to investigate the in vivo effect and basic mechanisms underlying CDR on muscle regeneration. The in vitro assay illustrated that CDR was non-cytotoxic to immortalized rat myoblast culture and increased cell viability. Histological results demonstrated that the CDR treatment facilitated muscle repair by increasing the number of new muscle fibers and promoting muscle integrity. The CDR treatment also upregulated the expression of Pax7, MyoD and myogenin, as evidenced by an immunohistochemical study. A gene expression analysis indicated that the CDR treatment accelerated the regeneration and remodeling phases during muscle repair. This study demonstrated that topical CDR treatment was effective at facilitating muscle injury repair. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Pharmacological Management of Bone and Muscle Disorders)
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