Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 June 2024 | Viewed by 5131

Special Issue Editors

School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology (Shenzhen), Shenzhen 518055, China
Interests: nanoscale 3D printing; direct laser writing; plasmonics
Engineering Product Development, Singapore University of Technology and Design, Singapore 487372, Singapore
Interests: nanoscale 3D printing; diffractive optics; plasmonics; metasurfaces

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Structures with nano- and microscale feature sizes usually exhibit intriguing properties distinct from those of their bulk counterparts. Investigations on the novel mechanisms in nano/microsystems have brought the development of numerous manufacturing techniques. We have also witnessed the power of advanced manufacturing techniques in deepening the fundamental understanding of physical/chemical/biological phenomena and promoting the miniaturization of optical/electrical/magnetic/mechanical/acoustic devices. The micro/nanoscale manufacturing techniques, categorized as either geometrically additive or subtractive, include e-beam lithography, focused ion beam lithography, photolithography, direct laser writing, nanoimprint, wet-chemistry synthesis, self-assembly, etc. The material database for micro/nanoscale advanced manufacturing has grown tremendously from metals, silicon, and polymers to biomaterials and 2D materials. The fabricated structures range from micro/nanoarchitectures with 2D and 3D features to dynamic devices with time as the fourth dimension. The combination of several manufacturing processes and materials to form a hybrid approach has also been explored to overcome the challenges of precise and cost-efficient fabrication, towards environmentally friendly and mass production for industrial applications.  

This Special Issue aims to cover recent progress in fundamental studies, technical advancements, and applications of micro/nanoscale advanced manufacturing. Original research articles, communications, review articles, and perspective views are welcome.

Dr. Qifeng Ruan
Dr. Hao Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • advanced manufacturing
  • microscale
  • nanoscale
  • 2D structures
  • 3D structures
  • dynamic structures
  • hybrid manufacturing

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 4820 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Fe@Fe3O4/ZnFe2O4 Powders and Their Consolidation via Hybrid Cold-Sintering/Spark Plasma-Sintering
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(2), 149; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14020149 - 10 Jan 2024
Viewed by 554
Abstract
Our study is focused on optimizing the synthesis conditions for the in situ oxidation of Fe particles to produce Fe@Fe3O4 core–shell powder and preparation via co-precipitation of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles to produce Fe@Fe3O4/ZnFe2 [...] Read more.
Our study is focused on optimizing the synthesis conditions for the in situ oxidation of Fe particles to produce Fe@Fe3O4 core–shell powder and preparation via co-precipitation of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles to produce Fe@Fe3O4/ZnFe2O4 soft magnetic composites (SMC) through a hybrid cold-sintering/spark plasma-sintering technique. XRD and FTIR measurements confirmed the formation of a nanocrystalline oxide layer on the surface of Fe powder and the nanosized nature of ZnFe2O4 nanoparticles. SEM-EDX investigations revealed that the oxidic phase of our composite was distributed on the surface of the Fe particles, forming a quasi-continuous matrix. The DC magnetic characteristics of the composite compact revealed a saturation induction of 0.8 T, coercivity of 590 A/m, and maximum relative permeability of 156. AC magnetic characterization indicated that for frequencies higher than 1 kHz and induction of 0.1 T, interparticle eddy current losses dominated due to ineffective electrical insulation between neighboring particles in the composite compact. Nevertheless, the magnetic characteristics obtained in both DC and AC magnetization regimes were comparable to those reported for cold-sintered Fe-based SMCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale)
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18 pages, 8366 KiB  
Article
Microfluidic Vaterite Synthesis: Approaching the Nanoscale Particles
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 3075; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13233075 - 04 Dec 2023
Viewed by 787
Abstract
The challenge of continuous CaCO3 particle synthesis is addressed using microfluidic technology. A custom microfluidic chip was used to synthesize CaCO3 nanoparticles in vaterite form. Our focus revolved around exploring one-phase and two-phase synthesis methods tailored for the crystallization of these [...] Read more.
The challenge of continuous CaCO3 particle synthesis is addressed using microfluidic technology. A custom microfluidic chip was used to synthesize CaCO3 nanoparticles in vaterite form. Our focus revolved around exploring one-phase and two-phase synthesis methods tailored for the crystallization of these nanoparticles. The combination of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle scattering allowed for an evaluation of the synthesis efficiency, including the particle size distribution, morphology, and polymorph composition. The results demonstrated the superior performance of the two-phase system when precipitation occurred inside emulsion microreactors, providing improved size control compared with the one-phase approach. We also discussed insights into particle size changes during the transition from one-phase to two-phase synthesis. The ability to obtain CaCO3 nanoparticles in the desired polymorph form (∼50 nm in size, 86–99% vaterite phase) with the possibility of scaling up the synthesis will open up opportunities for various industrial applications of the developed two-phase microfluidic method. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale)
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8 pages, 1599 KiB  
Communication
Efficient Mode Conversion from a Standard Single-Mode Fiber to a Subwavelength-Diameter Microfiber
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(23), 3003; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13233003 - 23 Nov 2023
Viewed by 703
Abstract
Efficient mode conversion is crucial for hybrid photonic systems. We present efficient light transition from a standard single-mode fiber (SMF) to a subwavelength-diameter microfiber via a relatively short tapered fiber. Numerical simulations were performed to design the tapered morphology with high transmittance (approximately [...] Read more.
Efficient mode conversion is crucial for hybrid photonic systems. We present efficient light transition from a standard single-mode fiber (SMF) to a subwavelength-diameter microfiber via a relatively short tapered fiber. Numerical simulations were performed to design the tapered morphology with high transmittance (approximately 86%) for the fundamental modes. The designed tapered fiber was successfully fabricated on the top of a cleaved SMF tip by the direct laser writing (DLW) method. For the 1550 nm wavelength, the transmittance from the standard SMF to the subwavelength-diameter microfiber was determined to be 77%, accompanied by a change in the effective mode area from 38 μm2 to 0.47 μm2 within a very short length of 150 μm. Our result demonstrated the versatility of the DLW technique for boosting the mode conversion efficiency of fiber-to-chip devices, enabling various applications in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale)
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9 pages, 2655 KiB  
Article
UV-Nanoimprint Lithography for Predefined SERS Nanopatterns Which Are Reproducible at Low Cost and High Throughput
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(10), 1598; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13101598 - 10 May 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1276
Abstract
A controlled and reliable nanostructured metallic substrate is a prerequisite for developing effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy techniques. In this study, we present a novel SERS platform fabricated using ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) to produce large-area, ordered nanostructured arrays. By using UV-NIL [...] Read more.
A controlled and reliable nanostructured metallic substrate is a prerequisite for developing effective surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy techniques. In this study, we present a novel SERS platform fabricated using ultra-violet nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL) to produce large-area, ordered nanostructured arrays. By using UV-NIL imprinted patterns in resist, we were able to overcome the main limitations present in most common SERS platforms, such as nonuniformity, nonreproducibility, low throughput, and high cost. We simulated and fabricated C-shaped plasmonic nanostructures that exhibit high signal enhancement at an excitation wavelength of 785 nm. The substrates were fabricated by directly coating the imprinted resist with a thin gold layer. Avoiding the need to etch patterns in silicon significantly reduces the time and cost of fabrication and facilitates reproducibility. The functionality of the substrates for SERS detection was validated by measuring the SERS spectra of Rhodamine 6G. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale)
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19 pages, 28125 KiB  
Article
Effects of Nano-CeO2 on Microstructure and Properties of WC/FeCoNiCrMo0.2 Composite High Entropy Alloy Coatings by Laser Cladding
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(6), 1104; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13061104 - 19 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1296
Abstract
FeCoNiCrMo0.2 high entropy alloy has many excellent properties, such as high strength, high wear resistance, high corrosion resistance, and high ductility. To further improve the properties of this coating, FeCoNiCrMo high entropy alloy (HEA) coatings, and two composite coatings, FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + WC and [...] Read more.
FeCoNiCrMo0.2 high entropy alloy has many excellent properties, such as high strength, high wear resistance, high corrosion resistance, and high ductility. To further improve the properties of this coating, FeCoNiCrMo high entropy alloy (HEA) coatings, and two composite coatings, FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + WC and FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + WC + CeO2, were prepared on the surface of 316L stainless steel by laser cladding technology. After adding WC ceramic powder and CeO2 rare earth control, the microstructure, hardness, wear resistance, and corrosion resistance of the three coatings were carefully studied. The results show that WC powder significantly improved the hardness of the HEA coating and reduced the friction factor. The FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + 32%WC coating showed excellent mechanical properties, but the distribution of hard phase particles in the coating microstructure was uneven, resulting in unstable distribution of hardness and wear resistance in each region of the coating. After adding 2% nano-CeO2 rare earth oxide, although the hardness and friction factor decreased slightly compared with the FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + 32%WC coating, the coating grain structure was finer, which reduced the porosity and crack sensitivity of the coating, and the phase composition of the coating did not change; there was a uniform hardness distribution, a more stable friction coefficient, and the flattest wear morphology. In addition, under the same corrosive environment, the value of polarization impedance of the FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + 32%WC + 2%CeO2 coating was greater, the corrosion rate was relatively low, and the corrosion resistance was better. Therefore, based on various indexes, the FeCoNiCrMo0.2 + 32%WC + 2%CeO2 coating has the best comprehensive performance and can extend the service life of 316L workpieces. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Manufacturing on Nano- and Microscale)
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