Advanced Understanding of Metal Nanoparticles in Catalysts

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Catalysis".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2024) | Viewed by 2977

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Tecnología Química, CSIC-UPV, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Av de los Naranjos s/n, 46022 Valencia, Spain
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; in situ spectroscopy; infrared; Raman; XPS; near ambient XPS (NAP-XPS) spectroscopy; metal nanoparticles; metal cluster

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Catalysis plays a key role in the energy transition, where decarbonization of the energetic sector, the integration of renewable energies, and the introduction of new production processes, such as electrocatalytic processes, are strongly required. However, the complexity of catalysts and the lack of knowledge of active sites, represent the main obstacles to the deployment of these technologies. In recent years, research has shown that during reactions, catalysts can face a series of restructuring phenomena, morphological modifications, redispersion, segregation, leaching, and/or metal-support interaction effects. These have opened a range of research opportunities, focused on achieving a better understanding of catalytic systems.

This Special Issue has the objective of encompassing relevant studies in the field of catalysis, with special emphasis on metallic nanoparticles and the role they play during the reaction, in order to achieve an advanced understanding of surface phenomena that directly influence the overall catalytic efficiency of the systems. The goal is to promote current knowledge about metal nanoparticles and about new techniques that can contribute to the state of the art of the discipline and future applications.

Potential topics in this Special Issue are:

  • In situ or operando spectroscopy;
  • Catalyst restructuration and dynamic behavior;
  • CO2 valorization;
  • Catalysts in the production and storage of green hydrogen.

Dr. Patricia Concepción
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • heterogeneous catalysis
  • metal nanoparticles
  • active site
  • spectroscopy
  • restructuration
  • reaction kinetics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 6571 KiB  
Article
In Situ Monitoring of Non-Thermal Plasma Cleaning of Surfactant Encapsulated Nanoparticles
by Gengnan Li, Dmitri N. Zakharov, Sayantani Sikder, Yixin Xu, Xiao Tong, Panagiotis Dimitrakellis and Jorge Anibal Boscoboinik
Nanomaterials 2024, 14(3), 290; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano14030290 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 844
Abstract
Surfactants are widely used in the synthesis of nanoparticles, as they have a remarkable ability to direct their growth to obtain well-defined shapes and sizes. However, their post-synthesis removal is a challenge, and the methods used often result in morphological changes that defeat [...] Read more.
Surfactants are widely used in the synthesis of nanoparticles, as they have a remarkable ability to direct their growth to obtain well-defined shapes and sizes. However, their post-synthesis removal is a challenge, and the methods used often result in morphological changes that defeat the purpose of the initial controlled growth. Moreover, after the removal of surfactants, the highly active surfaces of nanomaterials may undergo structural reconstruction by exposure to a different environment. Thus, ex situ characterization after air exposure may not reflect the effect of the cleaning methods. Here, combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, in situ infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, and environmental transmission electron microscopy measurements with CO probe experiments, we investigated different surfactant-removal methods to produce clean metallic Pt nanoparticles from surfactant-encapsulated ones. It was demonstrated that both ultraviolet-ozone (UV-ozone) treatment and room temperature O2 plasma treatment led to the formation of Pt oxides on the surface after the removal of the surfactant. On the other hand, when H2 was used for plasma treatment, both the Pt0 oxidation state and nanoparticle size distribution were preserved. In addition, H2 plasma treatment can reduce Pt oxides after O2-based treatments, resulting in metallic nanoparticles with clean surfaces. These findings provide a better understanding of the various options for surfactant removal from metal nanoparticles and point toward non-thermal plasmas as the best route if the integrity of the nanoparticle needs to be preserved. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Understanding of Metal Nanoparticles in Catalysts)
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15 pages, 2523 KiB  
Article
Ruthenium Nanoparticles Stabilized with Methoxy-Functionalized Ionic Liquids: Synthesis and Structure–Performance Relations in Styrene Hydrogenation
by Deepthy Krishnan, Leonhard Schill, M. Rosa Axet, Karine Philippot and Anders Riisager
Nanomaterials 2023, 13(9), 1459; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano13091459 - 25 Apr 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1818
Abstract
A series of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) were synthesized by the organometallic approach in different functionalized imidazolium ionic liquids (FILs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed well-dispersed and narrow-sized RuNPs ranging from 1.3 to 2.2 nm, depending on the IL functionalization. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) [...] Read more.
A series of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) were synthesized by the organometallic approach in different functionalized imidazolium ionic liquids (FILs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed well-dispersed and narrow-sized RuNPs ranging from 1.3 to 2.2 nm, depending on the IL functionalization. Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) allowed the interaction between the RuNPs and the ILs to be studied. The RuNPs stabilized by methoxy-based FILs (MEM and MME) displayed a good balance between catalytic activity and stability when evaluated in the hydrogenation of styrene (S) under mild reaction conditions. Moreover, the catalysts showed total selectivity towards ethylbenzene (EB) under milder reaction conditions (5 bar, 30 °C) than reported in the literature for other RuNP catalysts. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Understanding of Metal Nanoparticles in Catalysts)
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