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Nanomedicine: Applications and Development Prospects

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 4101

Special Issue Editor

College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062, China
Interests: nanomedicine; nanobiomaterials; therapeutics; drug delivery; metabolism; disease; diagnosis; imaging; cancer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanomedicine, the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of human disease, has progressed significantly since its conception in the 1990s and attracted growing attention in recent years. Nanoparticles with unique transport, biological, optical, magnetic, electronic, or thermal properties have been utilized for drug delivery, disease therapy, diagnosis and imaging, synthetic vaccine development and miniature medical devices. Nowadays, several therapeutic nanoparticle (NP) platforms, such as liposomes, albumin NPs and polymeric micelles, have been approved for clinical use or are being investigated in clinical trials. Thus, nanomedicine demonstrate great promise in clinical translation and potential to meet future market demands for disease treatments. This Special Issue entitled “Nanomedicine Application and Development Prospects” invites papers (both original research articles and reviews) that explore the development and applications of novel nanobiomaterials and nanotherapeutics for disease treatments. The scope of the Special Issue includes (but are not limited to) the developments of novel nanobiomaterials, novel methods of drug delivery, the various aspects of disease therapeutic strategies and the improvements in diagnostics, contrast reagents, and medical devices.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Yu Cao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomedicine
  • nanobiomaterials
  • therapeutics
  • drug delivery
  • metabolism
  • disease
  • diagnosis
  • imaging
  • cancer

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 3926 KiB  
Article
Auricularia auricula Anionic Polysaccharide Nanoparticles for Gastrointestinal Delivery of Pinus koraiensis Polyphenol Used in Bone Protection under Weightlessness
by Li Kang, Qiao Li, Yonghui Jing, Feiyan Ren, Erzhuo Li, Xiangyin Zeng, Yier Xu, Dongwei Wang, Qiang Wang, Guicai Sun, Lijun Wei and Yan Diao
Molecules 2024, 29(1), 245; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29010245 - 2 Jan 2024
Viewed by 837
Abstract
Auricularia auricula polysaccharides used in Pinus koraiensis polyphenol encapsulation and delivery under weightlessness are rarely reported. In this study, an anionic polysaccharide fragment named AAP Iα with a molecular weight of 133.304 kDa was isolated and purified to construct a polyphenol encapsulation system. [...] Read more.
Auricularia auricula polysaccharides used in Pinus koraiensis polyphenol encapsulation and delivery under weightlessness are rarely reported. In this study, an anionic polysaccharide fragment named AAP Iα with a molecular weight of 133.304 kDa was isolated and purified to construct a polyphenol encapsulation system. Nanoparticles named NPs-PP loaded with a rough surface for Pinus koraiensis polyphenol (PP) delivery were fabricated by AAP Iα and ε-poly-L-lysine (ε-PL). SEM and the DLS tracking method were used to observe continuous changes in AAP Iα, ε-PL and PP on the nanoparticles’ rough surface assembly, as well as the dispersion and stability. Hydrophilic, monodisperse and highly negative charged nanoparticles can be formed at AAP Iα 0.8 mg/mL, ε-PL 20 μg/mL and PP 80 μg/mL. FT-IR was used to determine their electrostatic interactions. Release kinetic studies showed that nanoparticles had an ideal gastrointestinal delivery effect. NPs-PP loaded were assembled through electrostatic interactions between polyelectrolytes after hydrogen bonding formation in PP-AAP Iα and PP-ε-PL, respectively. Colon adhesion properties and PP delivery in vivo of nanoparticles showed that NPs-PP loaded had high adhesion efficiency to the colonic mucosa under simulated microgravity and could enhance PP bioavailability. These results suggest that AAP Iα can be used in PP encapsulation and delivery under microgravity in astronaut food additives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomedicine: Applications and Development Prospects)
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Review

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20 pages, 2030 KiB  
Review
Cancer Nanomedicine: Emerging Strategies and Therapeutic Potentials
by Manman Xu, Xinpu Han, Hongtai Xiong, Yijie Gao, Bowen Xu, Guanghui Zhu and Jie Li
Molecules 2023, 28(13), 5145; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules28135145 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 2879
Abstract
Cancer continues to pose a severe threat to global health, making pursuing effective treatments more critical than ever. Traditional therapies, although pivotal in managing cancer, encounter considerable challenges, including drug resistance, poor drug solubility, and difficulties targeting tumors, specifically limiting their overall efficacy. [...] Read more.
Cancer continues to pose a severe threat to global health, making pursuing effective treatments more critical than ever. Traditional therapies, although pivotal in managing cancer, encounter considerable challenges, including drug resistance, poor drug solubility, and difficulties targeting tumors, specifically limiting their overall efficacy. Nanomedicine’s application in cancer therapy signals a new epoch, distinguished by the improvement of the specificity, efficacy, and tolerability of cancer treatments. This review explores the mechanisms and advantages of nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery, highlighting passive and active targeting strategies. Furthermore, it explores the transformative potential of nanomedicine in tumor therapeutics, delving into its applications across various treatment modalities, including surgery, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiotherapy, photodynamic and photothermal therapy, gene therapy, as well as tumor diagnosis and imaging. Meanwhile, the outlook of nanomedicine in tumor therapeutics is discussed, emphasizing the need for addressing toxicity concerns, improving drug delivery strategies, enhancing carrier stability and controlled release, simplifying nano-design, and exploring novel manufacturing technologies. Overall, integrating nanomedicine in cancer treatment holds immense potential for revolutionizing cancer therapeutics and improving patient outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomedicine: Applications and Development Prospects)
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