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Recent Advances in Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Cross-Field Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 1216

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Organic Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 9 Wenyuan Road, Nanjing 210023, China
Interests: room-temperature phosphorescence; organic afterglow; fluorescence materials; organic light-emitting diodes; exciton modulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Room-temperature phosphorescence and related materials have attracted tremendous attention recently due to their spectacular photophysical properties and versatile applications in many fields. In particular, the exploration of purely organic room-temperature phosphorescent (RTP) materials is currently the focus of research in organic electronics with broad application areas spanning from information anticounterfeiting, and sensors to afterglow displays and bio-/X-ray imaging. The impressive charm of RTP materials relies on the fact that the significant breakthrough of the modulation of triplet state natures for on-demand achieving outstanding properties and functionalities through easy chemical modification with endless possibilities, revolutionizing the immanent understandings of the excited state characters originated from either organic or organic–inorganic hybrid materials. Even more impressively, the organic afterglow with persistent RTP shows ultralong-lived and persistent luminescence that can last for over 1 s under ambient conditions, demonstrating fundamental advances in performance promotion and application revolution of organic optoelectronic materials.

This Special Issue will compile recent developments in the field of high-performance RTP materials. The articles presented in this Special Issue will cover various topics, ranging from the luminescent mechanisms of RTP and afterglow, the design and characterization of RTP materials, to advanced optoelectronic applications in the fields of information encryptions, displays, programmable label and X-ray imaging, etc.

Prof. Dr. Runfeng Chen
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • room-temperature phosphorescence
  • organic afterglow
  • RTP materials
  • organic afterglow materials
  • RTP devices
  • luminescence mechanism

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 3164 KiB  
Article
Narrowband Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Afterglow Materials
by Wen Xia, Xun Li, Junbo Li, Qianqian Yan, Guangming Wang, Xixi Piao and Kaka Zhang
Molecules 2024, 29(10), 2343; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29102343 - 16 May 2024
Viewed by 249
Abstract
Narrowband afterglow materials display interesting functions in high-quality anti-counterfeiting and multiplexed bioimaging. However, there is still a limited exploration of these afterglow materials, especially for those with a full width at half maxima (FWHM) around 30 nm. Here, we report the fabrication of [...] Read more.
Narrowband afterglow materials display interesting functions in high-quality anti-counterfeiting and multiplexed bioimaging. However, there is still a limited exploration of these afterglow materials, especially for those with a full width at half maxima (FWHM) around 30 nm. Here, we report the fabrication of narrowband organic/inorganic hybrid afterglow materials via energy transfer technology. Coronene (Cor) with a long phosphorescence feature and broad phosphorescence band is selected as the donor for energy transfer, and inorganic quantum dots (QDs) of CdSe/ZnS with a narrowband emission are used as acceptors. Upon doping into the organic matrix, the resultant three-component materials exhibit a narrowband afterglow with an afterglow lifetime of approximately 3.4 s and an FWHM of 31 nm. The afterglow wavelength of the afterglow materials can be controlled by the QDs. This work based on organic/inorganic hybrids provides a facile approach for developing multicolor and narrowband afterglow materials, as well as opens a new way for expanding the features of organic afterglow for multifunctional applications. It is expected to rely on narrowband afterglow emitters to solve the “spectrum congestion” problem of high-density information storage in optical anti-counterfeiting and information encryption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials)
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13 pages, 7587 KiB  
Article
Direct Population of Triplet States for Efficient Organic Afterglow through the Intra/Intermolecular Heavy-Atom Effect
by Jie Yuan, Yongrong Wang, Binbin Zhou, Wenjing Xie, Botao Zheng, Jingyu Zhang, Ping Li, Tian Yu, Yuanyuan Qi, Ye Tao and Runfeng Chen
Molecules 2024, 29(5), 1014; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules29051014 - 26 Feb 2024
Viewed by 690
Abstract
Organic afterglow is a fascinating phenomenon with exceptional applications. However, it encounters challenges such as low intensity and efficiency, and typically requires UV-light excitation and facile intersystem crossing (ISC) due to its spin-forbidden nature. Here, we develop a novel strategy that bypasses the [...] Read more.
Organic afterglow is a fascinating phenomenon with exceptional applications. However, it encounters challenges such as low intensity and efficiency, and typically requires UV-light excitation and facile intersystem crossing (ISC) due to its spin-forbidden nature. Here, we develop a novel strategy that bypasses the conventional ISC pathway by promoting singlet-triplet transition through the synergistic effects of the intra/intermolecular heavy-atom effect in aromatic crystals, enabling the direct population of triplet excited states from the ground state. The resulting materials exhibit a bright organic afterglow with a remarkably enhanced quantum efficiency of up to 5.81%, and a significantly increased organic afterglow lifetime of up to 157 microseconds under visible light. Moreover, given the high-efficiency visible-light excitable organic afterglow emission, the potential application is demonstrated in lifetime-resolved, color-encoded, and excitation wavelength-dependent pattern encryption. This work demonstrates the importance of the direct population method in enhancing the organic afterglow performance and red-shifting the excitation wavelength, and provides crucial insights for advancing organic optoelectronic technologies that involve triplet states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Room Temperature Phosphorescence Materials)
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