Chemical Weathering Studies

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 June 2024 | Viewed by 778

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Diego De Souza Sardinha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Science and Technology, Federal University of Alfenas (UNIFAL), Poços de Caldas 37715-400, Brazil
Interests: water–rock/soil interaction; hydrochemistry; pedogeochemistry; riverbed sediments
Dr. Vania Rosolen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geology, University of São Paulo State, Rio Claro 13506-900, Brazil
Interests: water–rock/soil interaction; pedogeochemistry; landscape evolution
Dr. Leticia Hirata Godoy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
"Physical Environment Integrated Analysis" Researcher, Institute of Science and Technology, Federal University of Alfenas (UNIFAL), Poços de Caldas 37715-400, Brazil
Interests: lithogeochemistry; pedogeochemistry; geochronology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chemical weathering is an important process on Earth as it alters its rocks and models the surface of the planet, contributing to soil formation and water chemistry composition. Chemical weathering takes place when disequilibrium and rupture of the atoms’ crystal structures occur. Chemical reactions are responsible for a more stable arrangement of these structures, transforming the primary mineral of the original rock into a secondary mineral, thus originating an alteration complex and/or soil and leached solution.

The aim of this Special Issue, "Chemical Weathering Studies", is to contribute to the dissemination of all chemical weathering applications, which can comprise different analytical techniques, such as X-ray diffraction, microscopy, spectrometry, geochronological investigations and others. Furthermore, the chemical weathering process is an important issue, especially in the context of climate change, in which rock, soil, sediment and water interactions play a significant role in CO2 sequestration. In addition, it is also related to supergene deposit formation and associated impacts that alter geogenic chemical characteristics. On this specific matter, this issue gives space to studies that correlate to the anthropogenic influence in the natural chemical weathering cycle.

We are looking forward to receiving the partial or final results of studies from different regions of the world to ensure a worldwide perspective on this topic.

Dr. Diego De Souza Sardinha
Dr. Vania Rosolen
Dr. Leticia Hirata Godoy
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • major, minor and ree
  • hydrochemistry
  • hydrogeochemistry
  • pedogeochemistry
  • riverbed sediments
  • water–rock–soil interaction
  • CO2 sequestration
  • surface modeling
  • supergene alteration
  • supergene deposits
  • mine drainage
  • mine waste
  • heavy metal isotopes
  • risk assessment
  • soil contamination
  • pollution indices

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

15 pages, 5644 KiB  
Article
The Source, Mobility and Fate of Bismuth (Bi) in Legacy Mine Waste, Yxsjöberg, Sweden
Minerals 2024, 14(2), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/min14020122 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 619
Abstract
The usage of bismuth (Bi), a critical and strategic raw material, has increased in the last 10 years. At present, the knowledge of Bi geochemistry is too limited to develop accurate mine waste and water management strategies to prevent environmental impact. Therefore, its [...] Read more.
The usage of bismuth (Bi), a critical and strategic raw material, has increased in the last 10 years. At present, the knowledge of Bi geochemistry is too limited to develop accurate mine waste and water management strategies to prevent environmental impact. Therefore, its geochemistry was studied in historical tailings in Yxsjöberg, Sweden. Intact tailings cores and shore samples were geochemically and mineralogically analyzed. Groundwater was sampled between 2016 and 2021 and analyzed for 71 elements and (SO4, F, Cl). The results were correlated with metals and dissolved organic matter (DOC), which have been previously published. The total concentrations, sequential extraction and scanning electron microscopy–energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) mapping indicated that Bi had been mobilized from the primary mineral bismuthinite (Bi2S3). In the oxidized tailings from both the cores and shore, Bi was hypothesized to have adsorbed to iron (Fe) (hydr)oxides, which prohibited high concentrations of Bi leaching into the groundwater and surface water. Dissolved Bi in groundwater was significantly correlated with DOC. In surface water, dissolved Bi was transported more than 5 km from the tailings. This study indicates that Bi can become mobile from legacy mine waste due to the oxidation of bismuthinite and either be scavenged by adsorption of Fe (hydr)oxides or kept mobile in groundwater and surface water due to complexation with DOC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Chemical Weathering Studies)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Title: Weathering characteristics of Ultramafic rocks and nikel enrichment in Nuinua ultramafic massiff (North central Vietnam)
Authors: Pham Thanh Dang

2. Title: Synthetic overview of the genetic processes implied in the formation of Ni(Co, Sc) concentrations in New Caledonia
Authors: Michel Cathelineau, etc.

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