Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2021) | Viewed by 25184

Special Issue Editor

Department of Mineralogy and Petrology, University of Granada, 18002 Granada, Spain
Interests: magmatism; high-grade metamorphism; trace element and isotope geochemistry; mineral thermodynamics; thermobarometry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many aspects of the petrogenesis of igneous rocks can be addressed by analyzing the distribution of major and trace elements in igneous minerals. It is controlled by thermodynamic factors and may have a significant dependence on physicochemical parameters such as pressure, temperature or the fugacity of oxygen and other volatile components. This makes it possible to estimate the conditions of melting and magma crystallization from the composition of, respectively, (1) minerals from source-derived xenoliths (e.g., mantle xenoliths, restites in granitoids) and from melanosomes in anatectic complexes, and (2) phenocrysts and their hosted mineral and melt inclusions. The distribution of chemical components in minerals can also be controlled by kinetic factors, and complex zonation patterns in igneous minerals can arise by diffusion-controlled dissolution/growth related to the dynamics of magma chambers, which may involve processes in either open (magma mixing, refilling, degassing) or closed (magma convection, fractionational crystallization) systems. The fractionation of trace elements in magmatic processes is controlled by their mineral/melt partitioning and may result in characteristic geochemical signatures for the involvement of specific minerals in either the residuum or the extract as, for example, fractionation of HREE in basalts implying garnet in the residual mantle. On the other hand, trace element ratios such as Ce/Pb, Zr/Hf, Th/U, Th/Nb and Nb/Ta, as well as the composition of xenocrysts and their hosted mineral inclusions provide valuable constraints on the nature of magma sources.

This Special Issue aims to bring together contributions on major and trace element compositions of natural and synthetic minerals to address questions about the nature of magmatic sources, the mineral controls on trace element fractionation in magmatic processes, and the physicochemical conditions of melting and magma crystallization.

Prof. Dr. José Francisco Molina
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • magmatism
  • major and trace element geochemistry
  • element distribution in igneous minerals
  • thermodynamic and kinetic controls of element distribution
  • magmatic sources
  • major and trace element fractionation
  • igneous thermobarometry
  • physicochemical conditions of melting and magma crystallization

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 194 KiB  
Editorial
Editorial for Special Issue “Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals”
Minerals 2021, 11(9), 942; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11090942 - 29 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1109
Abstract
Since the pioneering work of Goldschmidt [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

19 pages, 3338 KiB  
Article
Origin of S-, A- and I-Type Granites: Petrogenetic Evidence from Whole Rock Th/U Ratio Variations
Minerals 2021, 11(7), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11070672 - 24 Jun 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 5135
Abstract
The origin and evolution of granites remain a matter of debate and several approaches have been made to distinguish between different granite types. Overall, granite classification schemes based on element concentrations and ratios, tectonic settings or the source rocks (I-, A-, S-type) are [...] Read more.
The origin and evolution of granites remain a matter of debate and several approaches have been made to distinguish between different granite types. Overall, granite classification schemes based on element concentrations and ratios, tectonic settings or the source rocks (I-, A-, S-type) are widely used, but so far, no systematic large-scale study on Th/U ratio variations in granites based on their source or tectonic setting has been carried out, even though these elements show very similar behavior during melting and subsequent processes. We therefore present a compiled study, demonstrating an easy approach to differentiate between S-, A- and I-type granites using Th and U concentrations and ratios measured with a portable gamma ray spectrometer. Th and U concentrations from 472 measurements in S- and I-type granites from the Variscan West-Bohemian Massif, Germany, and 78 measurements from Neoproterozoic A-type Malani granites, India, are evaluated. Our compendium shows significant differences in the average Th/U ratios of A-, I- and S-type granites and thus gives information about the source rock and can be used as an easy classification scheme. Considering all data from the studied A-, I- and S-type granites, Th/U ratios increase with rising Th concentrations. A-type granites have the highest Th/U ratios and high Th concentrations, followed by I-type granites. Th/U ratios in S- to I-type granites are lower than in A-type and I-type granites, but higher than in S-type granites. The variation of Th/U ratios in all three types of granite cannot be explained by fractional crystallization of monazite, zircon and other Th and U bearing minerals alone, but are mainly due to source heterogeneities and uranium mobilization processes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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11 pages, 13130 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Partition Experiment of Divalent Metal Ions between Sphalerite and 1 mol/L (Ni, Mg, Co, Fe, Mn)Cl2 Aqueous Solution under Supercritical Conditions
Minerals 2021, 11(4), 435; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11040435 - 20 Apr 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1594
Abstract
A simultaneous partition experiment of divalent metal ions was performed between sphalerite and 1 mol/L (Ni, Mg, Co, Fe, Mn)Cl2 aqueous solution under supercritical hydrothermal conditions of 500–800 °C and 100 MPa. The bulk partition coefficient that was defined by KPB [...] Read more.
A simultaneous partition experiment of divalent metal ions was performed between sphalerite and 1 mol/L (Ni, Mg, Co, Fe, Mn)Cl2 aqueous solution under supercritical hydrothermal conditions of 500–800 °C and 100 MPa. The bulk partition coefficient that was defined by KPB(ZnS) = (xMeS/xZnS)/(mMeaq/mZnaq) followed the order of Zn ≑ Co ≑ Ni > Fe > Mn > Mg at all temperatures. In the partition coefficient versus ionic radius (PC–IR) diagrams with the logarithmic value of the bulk partition coefficient (log KPB(ZnS)) on the vertical axis, and the ionic radius of the six-fold coordinated site on the horizontal axis, Ni shows a positive partition anomaly, and the other elements were almost on the PC–IR curve. Based on the PC–IR curve, the optimum ionic radius for sphalerite existed where the ionic radius was slightly larger than Zn (~0.76 Å). A Ni positive partition anomaly may result from its large electronegativity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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18 pages, 23835 KiB  
Article
Compositional Evolution of the Variscan Intra-Orogenic Extensional Magmatism in the Valencia del Ventoso Plutonic Complex, Ossa-Morena Zone (SW Iberia): A View from Amphibole Compositional Relationships
Minerals 2021, 11(4), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11040431 - 18 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2271
Abstract
The Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ), SW Iberia, has numerous Lower Carboniferous compositionally zoned plutons that formed in a Variscan intra-orogenic extensional setting. This magmatism shows a wide compositional variation comprising alkaline, transitional, and calc-alkaline suites. The calc-alkaline suite was produced by hybridization of alkaline [...] Read more.
The Ossa-Morena Zone (OMZ), SW Iberia, has numerous Lower Carboniferous compositionally zoned plutons that formed in a Variscan intra-orogenic extensional setting. This magmatism shows a wide compositional variation comprising alkaline, transitional, and calc-alkaline suites. The calc-alkaline suite was produced by hybridization of alkaline magmas with felsic melts generated by crustal anatexis related to the intrusion of mafic magmas in the middle crust. In this work, we present a textural and mineralogical study of the Variscan Valencia del Ventoso main pluton from the OMZ to track the compositional evolution of magmas during hybridization using constraints from amphibole compositions and to determine the P-T conditions of emplacement using amphibole-based thermobarometry. This pluton exhibits reverse zoning with an inner facies containing alkaline dolerites, gabbros, and quartz diorites, an intermediate facies with transitional diorites, and an outer facies with calc-alkaline quartz diorites to monzogranites. Magmas from the intermediate and border facies crystallized under oxidizing conditions at relatively low temperatures (range: 640–760 °C) and ca. 280–300 MPa, implying near H2O-saturated conditions. These rock facies show mineralogical evidence of hybridization between alkaline to mildly alkalic and calc-alkaline magmas. The former is inferred from the occurrence of antecrysts of labradorite-andesine, high-Ti pargasite-hastingsite, and biotite with deficiency in tetrahedral-site occupancy, a distinctive feature of biotite from the inner facies alkaline dolerites. This contrasts with later crystallization from the calc-alkaline magma of andesine-oligoclase, low-Ti magnesiohornblende-edenite, and biotite with full tetrahedral-site occupancy. Constraints from amphibole-melt compositional relationships in antecrystic high-Ti amphibole suggest that the alkaline magmatic component could have a high- to ultra-K affinity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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21 pages, 5219 KiB  
Article
Crystallization Conditions and Petrogenetic Characterization of Metaluminous to Peraluminous Calc-Alkaline Orogenic Granitoids from Mineralogical Systematics: The Case of the Cambrian Magmatism from the Sierra de Guasayán (Argentina)
Minerals 2021, 11(2), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11020166 - 05 Feb 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2892
Abstract
The Sierra de Guasayán (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina) is formed by low to medium grade metamorphic rocks intruded by Cambrian metaluminous (La Soledad quartz-diorite), slightly peraluminous (Guasayán, El Escondido and El Martirizado granodiorite plutons), and strongly peraluminous (Alto Bello granodiorite) granitoids of the [...] Read more.
The Sierra de Guasayán (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina) is formed by low to medium grade metamorphic rocks intruded by Cambrian metaluminous (La Soledad quartz-diorite), slightly peraluminous (Guasayán, El Escondido and El Martirizado granodiorite plutons), and strongly peraluminous (Alto Bello granodiorite) granitoids of the Pampean magmatic arc. Chemical compositions of amphibole, plagioclase, biotite, and titanite indicate that these granitoids were emplaced at low pressure (mostly <3 kbar) and temperature (<770 °C) under oxidizing conditions (QFM + 1 and QFM + 2), which are similar to the emplacement conditions reported for other granites of the Pampean magmatic arc. Mineral assemblages and whole-rock and mineral chemistry of the granitoids from the Sierra de Guasayán indicate an I-type affinity for the La Soledad quartz-diorite (amphibole, biotite, and titanite), S-type affinity for the Alto Bello granodiorite (biotite, muscovite, cordierite, and sillimanite), and a hybrid nature for the main Guasayán and El Escondido plutons (biotite, monazite, and magnetite). This hybrid nature is supported by the presence of abundant mafic microgranular enclaves and rapakivi texture and by published zircon Hf-isotope data (εHfi ranging from −4.76 to −0.12). This suggests, in turn, the involvement of hybridization in the genesis of these granitoids, which seems to be a common mechanism operating in the Pampean magmatic arc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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32 pages, 70698 KiB  
Article
Oxygen Fugacity and Volatile Content of Syntectonic Magmatism in the Neoarchean Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Superior Province, Canada
Minerals 2020, 10(11), 966; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10110966 - 28 Oct 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 4490
Abstract
Neoarchean syntectonic intrusions from the Chibougamau area, northeastern Abitibi Subprovince (greenstone belt), may be genetically related to intrusion related gold mineralization. These magmatic-hydrothermal systems share common features with orogenic gold deposits, such as spatial and temporal association with syntectonic magmatism. Genetic association with [...] Read more.
Neoarchean syntectonic intrusions from the Chibougamau area, northeastern Abitibi Subprovince (greenstone belt), may be genetically related to intrusion related gold mineralization. These magmatic-hydrothermal systems share common features with orogenic gold deposits, such as spatial and temporal association with syntectonic magmatism. Genetic association with magmatism, however, remains controversial for many greenstone belt hosted Au deposits. To precisely identify the link between syntectonic magmas and gold mineralization in the Abitibi Subprovince, major and trace-element compositions of whole rock, zircon, apatite, and amphibole grains were measured for five intrusions in the Chibougamau area; the Anville, Saussure, Chevrillon, Opémisca, and Lac Line Plutons. The selected intrusions are representative of the chemical diversity of synvolcanic (TTG suite) and syntectonic (e.g., sanukitoid, alkaline intrusion) magmatism. Chemical data enable calculation of oxygen fugacity and volatile content, and these parameters were interpreted using data collected by electron microprobe and laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The zircon and apatite data and associated oxygen fugacity values in magma indicate that the youngest magmas are the most oxidized. Moreover, similar oxygen fugacity and high volatile content for both the Saussure Pluton and the mineralized Lac Line intrusion may indicate a possible prospective mineralized system associated with the syntectonic Saussure intrusion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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11 pages, 2126 KiB  
Article
Simultaneous Partitioning of Divalent Metal Ions between Alabandite and 1 mol/L (Ni, Mg, Co, Zn, Fe)Cl2 Aqueous Solutions under Supercritical Conditions
Minerals 2020, 10(8), 696; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10080696 - 05 Aug 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1904
Abstract
To clarify the element partitioning behavior between minerals and aqueous chloride solutions, we conducted experiments to investigate simultaneous partitioning of Ni2+, Mg2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ ions between alabandite (MnS) and [...] Read more.
To clarify the element partitioning behavior between minerals and aqueous chloride solutions, we conducted experiments to investigate simultaneous partitioning of Ni2+, Mg2+, Co2+, Zn2+, Fe2+, and Mn2+ ions between alabandite (MnS) and 1 mol/L (Ni, Mg, Co, Zn, Fe)Cl2 aqueous solutions at 500–800 °C and 100 MPa. The bulk partition coefficients calculated using the following equation were in the order of Fe2+ > Co2+ > Ni2+ ≈ Zn2+ > Mn2+ >> Mg2+; KPN = (xMeS/mMeaq)/(xMnS/mMnaq). A partition coefficient-ionic radius (PC-IR) curve was plotted with the logarithmic value of the partition coefficient on the y-axis and the ionic radius at the six-fold coordinated site on the x-axis. The peak of this curve was located near the ionic radius of Fe2+ and not near the ionic radius of Mn2+. Zn2+ showed a slight negative partitioning anomaly, which increased in the order of sulfide minerals < arsenic sulfide minerals < arsenide minerals as the covalent bond became stronger. Ni2+ showed a positive partitioning anomaly, which indicated that it preferred an octahedral structure. The width of the PC-IR curve decreased in the order of sulfide minerals > arsenic sulfide minerals > arsenide minerals as the covalent bond became stronger, that is, the ion selectivity became stronger. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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20 pages, 5824 KiB  
Article
Geochemistry and Texture of Clinopyroxene Phenocrysts from Paleoproterozoic Picrobasalts, Karelian Craton, Fennoscandian Shield: Records of Magma Mixing Processes
Minerals 2020, 10(5), 434; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10050434 - 12 May 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3894
Abstract
This paper presents an integrated major and trace element data and crystal size distribution analysis for zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts hosted in variolitic and massive picrobasalts of the Suisaari Formation, Karelian Craton, Eastern Fennoscandian Shield. Clinopyroxenes in variolitic and massive lavas occur as unzoned, [...] Read more.
This paper presents an integrated major and trace element data and crystal size distribution analysis for zoned clinopyroxene phenocrysts hosted in variolitic and massive picrobasalts of the Suisaari Formation, Karelian Craton, Eastern Fennoscandian Shield. Clinopyroxenes in variolitic and massive lavas occur as unzoned, reverse, and normally zoned crystal. Oscillatory-zoned clinopyroxenes are only observed in variolitic lavas. The obtained data were examined in order to evaluate the contribution of magmatic processes such as magma mixing, contamination and fractional crystallization to the formation of various zoning patterns of clinopyroxene phenocrysts. Clinopyroxene phenocrysts in both variolitic and massive lavas originate from similar primary melts from a single magmatic source. The obtained data on composition and texture of clinopyroxene phenocrysts together with the crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis suggest that crystallization of the massive lavas mainly involves fractionation in a closed magmatic system, whereas the crystallization of the variolitic lavas is determined by processes in an open magmatic system. The results provide novel information on the evolution of Paleoproterozoic magmatic systems in the Karelian Craton. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Distribution of Major- and Trace-Elements in Igneous Minerals)
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