Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Mineralogy and Biogeochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2024 | Viewed by 13688

Special Issue Editor

Institute of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Warsaw, Poland
Interests: environmental chemistry; environmental pollution; soil amendments; soil reclamation; risk minimization
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I have the pleasure of inviting you to participate in a Special Issue of Minerals devoted to the Application of Mineral-based Amendments.

This Special Issue will focus on recent progress in mineral-based amendments with various applications in many branches of industrial, agricultural, and environmental engineering. In addition, the mineralogical aspects of these amendments will also be considered.

As a result of ongoing urbanization, excessive exploitation of the environment, and constantly increasing human populations, the level of contamination of individual components of the natural environment (water, soil, air) has been increasing. Pressure on the environment connected with different contaminations exerts a real and constantly increasing influence on the quality of life. Along with an increased ecological awareness of society, we observe an increasing role of the reclamation of degraded areas. Thus, it is very important to seek out new solutions for contaminated areas, where the application of mineral-based amendments is gaining increasing importance. In addition, properties of all mineral-based amendments can be improved with advanced modifications to extend their applications. The rate of innovation and dissemination of new solutions plays a major role in this case.

The aim of this Special Issue is to bring together researchers from various disciplines to increase the number of possible applications of mineral-based amendments. I especially encourage papers on the development of novel applications of mineral-based amendments with an interdisciplinary perspective.

Dr. Maja Radziemska
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Applied amendments
  • Mineral-based materials
  • New technologies
  • Agriculture and pharmaceutical uses
  • Environmental implications
  • Laboratory and field studies

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 6785 KiB  
Article
Blast Furnace Slag, Post-Industrial Waste or Valuable Building Materials with Remediation Potential?
Minerals 2022, 12(4), 478; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12040478 - 14 Apr 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2860
Abstract
In recent years, the construction industry has struggled with a variety of issues such as material availability, supply channel management, and the increasing cost of construction materials. These issues have encouraged the search for replacements and substitutes for existing construction materials. Blast Furnace [...] Read more.
In recent years, the construction industry has struggled with a variety of issues such as material availability, supply channel management, and the increasing cost of construction materials. These issues have encouraged the search for replacements and substitutes for existing construction materials. Blast Furnace Slag is used in the construction industry as a mineral amendment or aggregate. Their use in Earth Construction, due to their post-industrial origin, may be associated with increased levels of potentially toxic elements (PTE) in the soil. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of the immobilization potential of Blast Furnace Slag and to compare it with the addition of Blast Furnace Slag with Activated Carbon using different concentrations of these amendments. We were able to determine the concentrations of selected PTE (zinc, copper, nickel, cadmium and lead) in the soil, roots and aerial parts of Lolium perenne L., using different concentrations of Blast Furnace Slag (3%, 5% and 10%), and Blast Furnace Slag with Activated Carbon (3% and 5%) as soil amendments. Measurements were carried out with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (FAAS). Both the addition of Blast Furnace Slag and Activated Carbon with Slag increased plant biomass. The addition of slag effectively reduced the zinc, copper, cadmium and lead content of the soil, while the addition of Activated Carbon slag significantly increased the content of selected PETs in the roots and aerial parts of plants. It was considered reasonable to use Blast Furnace Slag with the addition of Activated Carbon in supporting the processes of the assisted phytostabilization of PTE polluted soils. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II)
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19 pages, 3354 KiB  
Article
Rehabilitation of Disturbed Lands with Industrial Wastewater Sludge
Minerals 2022, 12(3), 376; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12030376 - 18 Mar 2022
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 2957
Abstract
Wastelands of the mining industry are among the largest of disturbed areas that demand revitalization. To reduce environmental impact and to better manage these geo-resources, the formation of sustainable plant and soil complexes and the restoration of self-recovery soil function are critical points. [...] Read more.
Wastelands of the mining industry are among the largest of disturbed areas that demand revitalization. To reduce environmental impact and to better manage these geo-resources, the formation of sustainable plant and soil complexes and the restoration of self-recovery soil function are critical points. The successful return of vegetative cover at post-mining sites requires eliminating the deficiency of organic matter. For this, we assessed the usability of non-traditional ameliorants to provide a better understanding of benefits from mutual dependencies of environmental resources. To prevent losses and to close resource cycles, we studied the applicability of wastewater sludge from the pulp and paper (SPP) industry as an amendment to counteract soil degradation and rehabilitate human-disturbed lands. Waste rock limestone, beresite, and phosphogypsum substrates of post-mining sites were used in vitro for the application of sludge and peat mixture and consequent grass seeding. The formed vegetative cover was analyzed to compare the germination and biomass growth on reconstructed soils. We assessed the efficiency of ameliorant combinations by two approaches: (1) the traditional technique of cutting-off plant material to measure the obtained plant biomass, and (2) digital image analysis for RGB-processed photographs of the vegetative cover (r2 = 0.75–0.95). The effect of SPP on plant cover biomass and grass height showed similar results: land rehabilitation with the formation of a 20 cm soil layer on mine waste dumps was environmentally suitable with an SPP:soil ratio of 1:3. However, excessive application (ratio 1:1 of SPP to the soil) negatively affected seed germination and plant vegetation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II)
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24 pages, 4099 KiB  
Article
Microbial Diversity and P Content Changes after the Application of Sewage Sludge and Glyphosate to Soil
Minerals 2021, 11(12), 1423; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11121423 - 16 Dec 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2137
Abstract
Pesticides, despite their side effects, are still being used in almost every agriculture, horticulture, maintaining municipal greenery in urban areas and even in home gardens. They influence human life and health and the functioning of entire ecosystems, including inanimate elements such as water [...] Read more.
Pesticides, despite their side effects, are still being used in almost every agriculture, horticulture, maintaining municipal greenery in urban areas and even in home gardens. They influence human life and health and the functioning of entire ecosystems, including inanimate elements such as water and soil. The aim of the study was the evaluation of the suitability of sewage sludge in improving the quality of soil treated with a non-selective herbicide-glyphosate, applied as Roundup 360 SL. A pot experiment was conducted with the use of two arable soils (MS and OS), which were amended with sewage sludge (SS), glyphosate (GL) and sewage sludge with glyphosate (SS+GL). Soil samples were taken after 24 h, 144 h and 240 h and total phosphorus (TP) content (TP), total number of bacteria/fungi, activity of dehydrogenases (Dha), acidic phosphatase (Acp), alkaline phosphatase (Alp), genetic biodiversity of bacteria/fungi using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism method were determined. The application of SS and GL to OS caused an increase in Acp (approximately 35%) and a decrease in Alp activity (approximately 20%). Additionally, GL may influence on an increase in the number of fungi and the decrease in the number of bacteria. In soil with SS+GL increase in the fungal diversity in MS and OS was also observed. Moreover, a positive between TP and the number of bacteria and the activity of phosphatases correlation was reported. The obtained results indicate that analyzed sewage sludge could be potentially applied into soil in in situ scale and could constitute a valuable reclamation material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II)
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26 pages, 1035 KiB  
Article
Do New-Generation Recycled Phosphorus Fertilizers Increase the Content of Potentially Toxic Elements in Soil and Plants?
Minerals 2021, 11(9), 999; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11090999 - 13 Sep 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2150
Abstract
Phosphorus (P)-rich secondary raw materials can provide a valuable base for modern mineral fertilizers, provided that the new formulations do not load the soil–plant system with potentially toxic elements. Fertilizers from sewage sludge ash (SSA) and/or animal bones, activated by phosphorus-solubilizing bacteria ( [...] Read more.
Phosphorus (P)-rich secondary raw materials can provide a valuable base for modern mineral fertilizers, provided that the new formulations do not load the soil–plant system with potentially toxic elements. Fertilizers from sewage sludge ash (SSA) and/or animal bones, activated by phosphorus-solubilizing bacteria (Bacillus megaterium or Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans), were tested in field experiments in north-eastern Poland. The reference provided treatments with superphosphate and treatment without phosphorus fertilization. In one experiment, all P-fertilizers were applied at a P dose of 21 kg·ha−1, and in the other three experiments, three P doses were adopted: 17.6, 26.4, and 35.2 kg·ha−1. The effect of recycled fertilizers on the content of arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), and zinc (Zn) in the soil, in wheat grain and straw (test plant), weeds, and post-harvest residues was investigated. The application of recycled fertilizers in P amounts up to 35.2 kg·ha−1 did not change the As, Cr, Ni, Cu, or Zn contents in the soil and plant biomass. The contents of these elements in soil were below the permissible levels for arable land in Poland. Their concentrations in wheat grain and straw did not exceed the permissible or suggested limits for plant material to be used for food and feed, while in the weed and post-harvest residue biomass, they usually fell within the biological plant variability ranges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II)
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20 pages, 2749 KiB  
Article
The Effect of Mineral-Based Mixtures Containing Coal Fly Ash and Sewage Sludge on Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Selected Morphological Parameters of Deciduous and Coniferous Trees
Minerals 2021, 11(7), 778; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11070778 - 18 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2217
Abstract
Coal fly ash (CFA), which is generated in huge quantities in coal-fired power plants, is a problem worldwide. Mixtures with ash and sewage sludge alter morphological and biochemical characteristics of plants. In this experiment, the response of pine, spruce, beech and alder growing [...] Read more.
Coal fly ash (CFA), which is generated in huge quantities in coal-fired power plants, is a problem worldwide. Mixtures with ash and sewage sludge alter morphological and biochemical characteristics of plants. In this experiment, the response of pine, spruce, beech and alder growing for four years to mineral mixtures based on coal fly ash and high salinity sewage sludge (SS) was studied. The four-year experiment determined the chlorophyll a fluorescence of the tested plants, their height and yield, the salinity level of the tested mixtures and their phytotoxicity. Mixtures of coal ash with sewage sludge proved to be more beneficial to plants than their separate application. After four years, among the studied species, the highest increase in height and biomass was recorded for European alder and Scots pine. These species were also characterized by high photosynthetic indices. Mixtures containing 29% SS created optimal conditions for the development of the studied tree species. Grey alder and ponderosa pine can be recommended for reclamation of degraded areas where CFA and SS mixtures are used. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of Mineral-Based Amendments, Volume II)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

 

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