Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "D:Materials and Processing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2024) | Viewed by 6531

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Departamento de Ciencias Básicas (IIT), Universidad Autónoma de Ciudad Juárez (UACJ), Chihuahua 32310, Mexico
Interests: ALD; XPS; batteries; nanoparticles; thin films

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanoparticles has revolutionized micro/nanofabrication prototyping in terms of energy and biomedicine over the past few years. With the recent improvements in battery technologies, highly complex electrodes can be fabricated via cost-effective chemical and physical protocols as a promising alternative to the conventional costly fabrication processes. Nanoparticles have enabled a wide range of energy and biochemistry applications, such as cancer detection, high-throughput drug testing, electrode development, and paint at visible absorption for SARS-CoV-2 inactivation. These nanoparticles enable agile iterative design and facilitate rapid prototyping and applications according their properties. This can make nanoparticle technology more accessible to researchers in various fields, and accelerates innovation in the field of nanoparticles. Accordingly, this Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers, communications, and review articles that focus on novel methodological developments in nanoparticles and their use for various biochemical and energy applications.

Prof. Dr. Pierre Giovanni Mani-Gonzalez
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • atomic-layer deposition
  • X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy
  • batteries
  • nanoparticles
  • thin films
  • nanowires
  • metal-oxide semiconductor field-emission transistors
  • semiconductors
  • high-k dielectric materials

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 6014 KiB  
Article
Study of CdS/CdS Nanoparticles Thin Films Deposited by Soft Chemistry for Optoelectronic Applications
by Laura Aislinn Carrasco-Chavez, José F. Rubio-Valle, Abimael Jiménez-Pérez, José E. Martín-Alfonso and Amanda Carrillo-Castillo
Micromachines 2023, 14(6), 1168; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14061168 - 31 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1719
Abstract
Chalcogenides semiconductors are currently being studied as active layers in the development of electronic devices in the field of applied technology. In the present paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films containing nanoparticles of the same material as the active layer were produced and [...] Read more.
Chalcogenides semiconductors are currently being studied as active layers in the development of electronic devices in the field of applied technology. In the present paper, cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films containing nanoparticles of the same material as the active layer were produced and analyzed for their application in fabricating optoelectronic devices. CdS thin films and CdS nanoparticles were obtained via soft chemistry at low temperatures. The CdS thin film was deposited via chemical bath deposition (CBD); the CdS nanoparticles were synthesized via the precipitation method. The construction of a homojunction was completed by incorporating CdS nanoparticles on CdS thin films deposited via CBD. CdS nanoparticles were deposited using the spin coating technique, and the effect of thermal annealing on the deposited films was investigated. In the modified thin films with nanoparticles, a transmittance of about 70% and a band gap between 2.12 eV and 2.35 eV were obtained. The two characteristic phonons of the CdS were observed via Raman spectroscopy, and the CdS thin films/CdS nanoparticles showed a hexagonal and cubic crystalline structure with average crystallite size of 21.3–28.4 nm, where hexagonal is the most stable for optoelectronic applications, with roughness less than 5 nm, indicating that CdS is relatively smooth, uniform and highly compact. In addition, the characteristic curves of current-voltage for as-deposited and annealed thin films showed that the metal-CdS with the CdS nanoparticle interface exhibits ohmic behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles)
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18 pages, 17345 KiB  
Article
Exploiting Interfacial Effects between Collapsing Bubbles and Nanocarbon/TiN Substrates for the Green Synthesis of Self-Organized Noble Metal and Nanoalloy Nanoparticles
by Mohammed Es-Souni
Micromachines 2023, 14(6), 1141; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14061141 - 28 May 2023
Viewed by 1015
Abstract
Noble metal nanoparticles and multi-materials thereof are processed on a substrate from aqueous solutions of the metallic ions, precluding any chemical additives/catalysts. The methods reported here take advantage of interactions between collapsing bubbles and the substrate that result in the generation of reducing [...] Read more.
Noble metal nanoparticles and multi-materials thereof are processed on a substrate from aqueous solutions of the metallic ions, precluding any chemical additives/catalysts. The methods reported here take advantage of interactions between collapsing bubbles and the substrate that result in the generation of reducing radicals at the substrate surface and leading to the reduction of the metal ions on those sites, followed by nucleation and growth. Two selected substrates where these phenomena take place are nanocarbon and TiN. By either using ultrasonic radiation of the substrate in ionic solution or quenching the substrate in a solution from temperatures above the Leidenfrost temperature, a high density of nanoparticles of Au, Au/Pt, Au/Pd and Au/Pd/Pt are synthesized on the substrate surface. The sites where the reducing radicals are generated determine the self-assembly of the nanoparticles. The methods yield highly adherent surface films and nanoparticles; they are materials efficient and cost effective because only the surface is modified with costly materials. The formation mechanisms of these green multi-material NPs are described. Outstanding electrocatalytic performances in acidic solutions of methanol and formic acid are demonstrated. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles)
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14 pages, 2124 KiB  
Article
Fabrication of a Disposable Amperometric Sensor for the Determination of Nitrite in Food
by Chao Liu, Daoming Chen, Chunnan Zhu, Xiaojun Liu, Yu Wang, Yuepeng Lu, Dongyun Zheng and Baorong Fu
Micromachines 2023, 14(3), 687; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi14030687 - 20 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1408
Abstract
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized through an environmentally friendly method with tea extract as a reduction agent. By immobilizing them on the surface of a low-cost pencil graphite electrode (PGE) with the aid of a simple and well-controlled in-situ electropolymerization method, a novel [...] Read more.
Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesized through an environmentally friendly method with tea extract as a reduction agent. By immobilizing them on the surface of a low-cost pencil graphite electrode (PGE) with the aid of a simple and well-controlled in-situ electropolymerization method, a novel nanosensing interface for nitrite was constructed. The film-modified PGE showed good electrocatalytic effects on the oxidation of nitrite and was characterized through scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrochemical techniques. Characterization results clearly show that the successful modification of AgNPs improved the surface area and conductivity of PGEs, which is beneficial to the high sensitivity and short response time of the nitrite sensor. Under the optimal detection conditions, the oxidation peak current of nitrite had a good linear relationship with its concentration in the range of 0.02–1160 μmol/L with a detection limit of 4 nmol/L and a response time of 2 s. Moreover, the sensor had high sensitivity, a wide linear range, a good anti-interference capability, and stability and reproducibility. Additionally, it can be used for the determination of nitrite in food. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles)
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Review

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22 pages, 3523 KiB  
Review
Dynamic Light Scattering and Its Application to Control Nanoparticle Aggregation in Colloidal Systems: A Review
by Jesus Rodriguez-Loya, Maricarmen Lerma and Jorge L. Gardea-Torresdey
Micromachines 2024, 15(1), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15010024 - 22 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1524
Abstract
Colloidal systems and their control play an essential role in daily human activities, but several drawbacks lead to an avoidance of their extensive application in some more productive areas. Some roadblocks are a lack of knowledge regarding how to influence and address colloidal [...] Read more.
Colloidal systems and their control play an essential role in daily human activities, but several drawbacks lead to an avoidance of their extensive application in some more productive areas. Some roadblocks are a lack of knowledge regarding how to influence and address colloidal forces, as well as a lack of practical devices to understand these systems. This review focuses on applying dynamic light scattering (DLS) as a powerful tool for monitoring and characterizing nanoparticle aggregation dynamics. We started by outlining the core ideas behind DLS and how it may be used to examine colloidal particle size distribution and aggregation dynamics; then, in the last section, we included the options to control aggregation in the chemically processed toner. In addition, we pinpointed knowledge gaps and difficulties that obstruct the use of DLS in real-world situations. Although widely used, DLS has limits when dealing with complicated systems, including combinations of nanoparticles, high concentrations, and non-spherical particles. We discussed these issues and offered possible solutions and the incorporation of supplementary characterization approaches. Finally, we emphasized how critical it is to close the gap between fundamental studies of nanoparticle aggregation and their translation into real-world applications, recognizing challenges in colloidal science. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Self-Assembly of Nanoparticles)
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