Emerging Applications of Triboelectric Effects/Materials

A special issue of Micromachines (ISSN 2072-666X). This special issue belongs to the section "A:Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2024 | Viewed by 2659

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Associate Vice President (Research and Innovation), Chair Professor of Nature-Inspired Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: nature-inspired surfaces and materials; additive manufacturing; energy harvesting; fluid dynamics; soft matter; interfaces and surfaces

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Guest Editor
Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: energy harvesting; triboelectric phenomena and applications; triboelectric materials; nature-inspired surface engineering

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Guest Editor
School of Physics and Optoelectronics, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641, China
Interests: energy harvesting; triboelectric phenomena and applications; surface charge manipulation; self-powered sensors

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Triboelectric effects, an enigmatic and ubiquitous interfacial phenomenon, manifest through the generation of electric charges upon the contact and separation of dissimilar materials or even identical materials. Although its scientific genesis remains partially obscured, interfacial triboelectric effects assume mounting significance within contemporary scientific and technological realms owing to the pivotal role of interfaces as conduits for the transfer of mass and energy. By harnessing triboelectric effects, the meticulous control and regulation of material surface properties, including surface potential, wettability, adhesion, and surface conductivity, can be achieved, which is key for exploring interfacial/surface science and also various edge-cutting applications, such as energy harvesting, electrostatic liquid manipulation, high-sensitivity sensing, and touch-sensitive interfaces. One of the most promising areas pertains to triboelectric effect/material-mediated energy harvesting, which permits the electricity generation from low-frequency and highly decentralized mechanical energy existing in the surrounding environments, becoming a potential alternative to the conventional carbon-intensive fossil-fuel-based energy sources. This Special Issue seeks to showcase research papers, communications, and review articles that focus on recent advances relating to triboelectric effect/materials, from fundamental applications to innovative applications, thereby fostering and propelling further advancements in this captivating field.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Prof. Dr. Zuankai Wang
Dr. Wanghuai Xu
Prof. Dr. Hao WU
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • triboelectric effect
  • contact electrification
  • surface charges
  • energy harvesting
  • interfacial electric field
  • electrostatic surface sensing

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 6055 KiB  
Article
Miniaturized and High Volumetric Energy Density Power Supply Device Based on a Broad-Frequency Vibration Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator
by Liting Wu, Zewei Ren, Yanjun Wang, Yumin Tang, Zhong Lin Wang and Rusen Yang
Micromachines 2024, 15(5), 645; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15050645 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 673
Abstract
The widespread vibration is one of the most promising energy sources for IoT and small sensors, and broad-frequency vibration energy harvesting is important. Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can convert vibration energy into electrical energy through triboelectricity and electrostatic induction, providing an effective solution to [...] Read more.
The widespread vibration is one of the most promising energy sources for IoT and small sensors, and broad-frequency vibration energy harvesting is important. Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can convert vibration energy into electrical energy through triboelectricity and electrostatic induction, providing an effective solution to the collection of broad-frequency vibration energy. Also, the power supply in constrained and compact spaces has been a long-standing challenge. Here, a miniaturized power supply (MPS) based on a broad-frequency vibration-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) is developed. The size of the MPS is 38 mm × 26 mm × 20 mm, which can adapt to most space-limited environments. The TENG device is optimized through theoretical mechanical modeling for the external stimuli, it can efficiently harvest vibrational energy in the frequency range of 1–100 Hz and has a high output power density of 134.11 W/cm3. The developed device demonstrates its practical application potential in powering small electronics like LEDs, watches, and timers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Applications of Triboelectric Effects/Materials)
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12 pages, 2596 KiB  
Communication
Atomic Force Microscopy Study of the Long-Term Effect of the Glycerol Flow, Stopped in a Coiled Heat Exchanger, on Horseradish Peroxidase
by Yuri D. Ivanov, Ivan D. Shumov, Andrey F. Kozlov, Anastasia A. Valueva, Maria O. Ershova, Irina A. Ivanova, Alexander N. Ableev, Vadim Y. Tatur, Andrei A. Lukyanitsa, Nina D. Ivanova and Vadim S. Ziborov
Micromachines 2024, 15(4), 499; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15040499 - 4 Apr 2024
Viewed by 651
Abstract
Glycerol is employed as a functional component of heat-transfer fluids, which are of use in both bioreactors and various biosensor devices. At the same time, flowing glycerol was reported to cause considerable triboelectric effects. Herein, by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have [...] Read more.
Glycerol is employed as a functional component of heat-transfer fluids, which are of use in both bioreactors and various biosensor devices. At the same time, flowing glycerol was reported to cause considerable triboelectric effects. Herein, by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we have revealed the long-term effect of glycerol flow, stopped in a ground-shielded coiled heat exchanger, on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) adsorption on mica. Namely, the solution of HRP was incubated in the vicinity of the side of the cylindrical coil with stopped glycerol flow, and then HRP was adsorbed from this solution onto a mica substrate. This incubation has been found to markedly increase the content of aggregated enzyme on mica—as compared with the control enzyme sample. We explain the phenomenon observed by the influence of triboelectrically induced electromagnetic fields of non-trivial topology. The results reported should be further considered in the development of flow-based heat exchangers of biosensors and bioreactors intended for operation with enzymes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Applications of Triboelectric Effects/Materials)
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15 pages, 4998 KiB  
Article
Wind-Wave Synergistic Triboelectric Nanogenerator: Performance Evaluation Test and Potential Applications in Offshore Areas
by Zhen Pan, Weijian Wu, Jiangtao Zhou, Yili Hu, Jianping Li, Yingting Wang, Jijie Ma and Jianming Wen
Micromachines 2024, 15(3), 314; https://doi.org/10.3390/mi15030314 - 24 Feb 2024
Viewed by 909
Abstract
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can effectively collect low-frequency, disordered mechanical energy and are therefore widely studied in the field of ocean energy collection. Most of the rotary TENGs studied so far tend to have insufficient rotation, resulting in slow charge transfer rates in low-frequency [...] Read more.
Triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs) can effectively collect low-frequency, disordered mechanical energy and are therefore widely studied in the field of ocean energy collection. Most of the rotary TENGs studied so far tend to have insufficient rotation, resulting in slow charge transfer rates in low-frequency ocean environments. For this reason, in this paper, we propose a wind-wave synergistic triboelectric nanogenerator (WWS-TENG). It is different from the traditional rotary TENGs based on free-standing mode in that its power generation unit has two types of rotors, and the two rotors rotate in opposite directions under the action of wind energy and wave energy, respectively. This type of exercise can more effectively collect energy. The WWS-TENG has demonstrated excellent performance in sea wind and wave energy harvesting. In the simulated ocean environment, the peak power can reach 13.5 mW under simulated wind-wave superposition excitation; the output of the WWS-TENG increased by 49% compared to single-wave power generation. The WWS-TENG proposal provides a novel means of developing marine renewable energy, and it also demonstrates broad application potential in the field of the self-powered marine Internet of Things (IoT). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Applications of Triboelectric Effects/Materials)
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