Track Health at the Human-Animal-Ecosystem Interface: “One Health” Approach

A special issue of Microbiology Research (ISSN 2036-7481).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2022) | Viewed by 11371

Special Issue Editors


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Microbiology and Antibiotic Resistance Team (MicroART), Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: microbiology; one health; antimicrobial resistance; biofilms; microbial genetics; infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
1. Microbiology and Antibiotic Resistance Team (MicroART), Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro (UTAD), Vila Real, Portugal
2. LAQV@REQUIMTE, Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science and Technology, NOVA University of Lisbon, Almada, Portugal
Interests: microbiology; One Health; antimicrobial resistance; biofilms; microbial genetics; infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: microbiology; one health; antimicrobial resistance; biofilms; microbial genetics; infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Genetics and Biotechnology, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: microbiology; one health; antimicrobial resistance; biofilms; microbial genetics; infectious diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human health and animal health are interdependent and strategies that focus on analyzing just one aspect of these interrelationships are unlikely to prevent or eliminate underlying problems threatening good health. It is well known that the same microorganisms may infect animals and humans when they share the same ecosystems. For example, information on influenza viruses circulating in animals is crucial when considering which forms of the viruses to select when developing human vaccines for potential influenza pandemics. Antibiotic resistant bacteria can be transmitted between animals, humans, and environments through direct or indirect contact between the three different niches. To effectively contain antibiotic resistance, a well-coordinated approach encompassing studies in humans, animals and the environment is required. This Special Issue will embrace the One Health approach including research on designing and implementing programs, policies, legislation, and research in different areas of healthiness that work together to achieve better public health outcomes. Relevant areas include food safety, the control of zoonoses and combatting antibiotic resistance. Additionally, climate change, environmental pollution and approaches to control emerging infectious diseases are welcome. This Special Issue will be gathering together different strands of the current One Health trans-disciplinary approach with a view to solving critical global health challenges in a holistic way. Furthermore, it will serve as a forum to bring together researchers from different fields to share their knowledge and experience of the One Health approach and how it is advancing.

Prof. Dr. Patricia Poeta
Dr. Carla Miranda
Dr. Vanessa Silva
Dr. Gilberto Igrejas
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • One Health
  • antibimicrobial resistance
  • emerging infectious diseases
  • food safety

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 1654 KiB  
Article
Human and Companion Animal Proteus mirabilis Sharing
by Cátia Marques, Adriana Belas, Juliana Menezes, Joana Moreira da Silva, Patrícia Cavaco-Silva, Graça Trigueiro, Luís T. Gama and Constança Pomba
Microbiol. Res. 2022, 13(1), 38-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/microbiolres13010003 - 29 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 7803
Abstract
Proteus mirabilis is an important pathogen that is associated with urinary tract infections. This study aims to determine the colonization and sharing of P. mirabilis between healthy companion animals and humans that are living together and to evaluate the clonal relatedness of the [...] Read more.
Proteus mirabilis is an important pathogen that is associated with urinary tract infections. This study aims to determine the colonization and sharing of P. mirabilis between healthy companion animals and humans that are living together and to evaluate the clonal relatedness of the fecal and clinical stains. Eighteen households (24 humans, 18 dogs, 8 cats) with at least one human–animal pair were studied. Fecal samples were plated onto MacConkey and Hektoen agar and P. mirabilis PFGE analysis (NotI; Dice/UPGMA; 1.5% tolerance) was conducted for the households with multiple positive participants. Antimicrobial-resistance was tested according to CLSI. The fecal P. mirabilis pulse-types were compared with uropathogenic clinical strains (n = 183). Forty-nine P. mirabilis were isolated from eight households. The percentage of colonization in the dogs (44.4%, n = 8/18) was significantly higher (p = 0.0329) than in the humans (12.5%, n = 3/24). Three households had multiple colonized participants. One human–dog pair shared related P. mirabilis strains, which clustered with a clinical strain of animal origin (82.5%). One fecal P. mirabilis strain, from a dog, clustered with two human community-acquired clinical strains (80.9%, 88.9%). To our knowledge, this is the first report of dogs and humans living in close contact and sharing related P. mirabilis strains. The high frequency of colonization in the dogs underlines their possible role as P. mirabilis reservoirs for humans and other dogs. Full article
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11 pages, 1139 KiB  
Article
Dynamics of Microbial Shedding in Market Pigs during Fasting and the Influence of Alginate Hydrogel Bead Supplementation during Transportation
by Mariana Fernandez, Arlene Garcia, David A. Vargas and Alexandra Calle
Microbiol. Res. 2021, 12(4), 888-898; https://doi.org/10.3390/microbiolres12040065 - 13 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2481
Abstract
The shedding of foodborne pathogenic bacteria by food-animals can be affected by multiple factors, such as animal health, diet, stress, and environmental conditions. The practices that come with transport involve fasting, handling, mixing with unfamiliar pigs, and fluctuating temperatures. These practices, especially fasting [...] Read more.
The shedding of foodborne pathogenic bacteria by food-animals can be affected by multiple factors, such as animal health, diet, stress, and environmental conditions. The practices that come with transport involve fasting, handling, mixing with unfamiliar pigs, and fluctuating temperatures. These practices, especially fasting and transport, can increase the microbial load in the feces of animals. The use of alginate hydrogels is a novel delivery system that can be a potential food safety intervention during transport to induce satiety and provide electrolytes to the animal’s system. This study sought to observe microbial shedding as affected by fasting and hydrogel bead supplementation during transport. Sixty market pigs were subjected to a 12 h fasting period and an additional 4 h transport period, in which a treatment group was fed hydrogel beads and a control group was not. Sampling points were before fast (BF), before transport (BT), and after transport (AT). Fecal samples were collected from every animal at each sampling point. Results from this study showed a significant increase in the concentrations of both Enterobacteriaceae and Escherichia coli between the before fast (BF) and after transport (AT) sampling points. However, no difference (p > 0.05) was found between the treatment (hydrogel) and control (no hydrogel) during transport. Moreover, no significant difference was found in the prevalence of Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 at the three different sampling points, or between the treatment and control groups. Full article
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