Design and Optimisation of Membrane Technologies for Wastewater Treatment

A special issue of Membranes (ISSN 2077-0375).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 1047

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
State Key Lab of Separation Membranes and Membrane Processes, Tiangong University, Tianjin, China
Interests: membranes; reverse osmosis; membrane technology; separation technology; membrane separation; wastewater treatment; desalination

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Guest Editor
Hangzhou Institute of Technology, Xidian University, Hangzhou, China
Interests: membrane formation; membrane adsorption; membrane distillation

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Guest Editor
College of Chemistry, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
Interests: membrane separation; adsorption; ion exchange

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The recent surge in interest in membrane technology and its cutting-edge applications among academics and scientists is indicative of its potential to address the complex issues associated with wastewater treatment. This Special Issue was developed with the explicit purpose of delving into advanced membrane-based technologies tailored for desalination and water reuse. The central focus of this initiative is the development of efficient separation membranes, involving a meticulous exploration of their fabrication and performance optimisation. The spectrum of technologies covered includes membrane distillation (MD), pervaporation (PV), forward osmosis (FO), reverse osmosis (RO), nanofiltration (NF), ultrafiltration (UF), microfiltration (MF), and more. Encompassing both experimental and theoretical research activities, this Special Issue aims to create a comprehensive understanding of these membrane technologies within the field of water reuse and desalination applications. Esteemed researchers and academics are warmly invited to contribute their latest findings to bring forth a wealth of insights into the design and development of advanced membrane-based technologies. Original research and review papers are sought to enrich the scholarly discourse, fostering a collaborative environment to advance our understanding of sustainable wastewater treatment.

This Special Issue serves as a dynamic platform for the exchange of knowledge, where the collective contributions of researchers will contribute to transformative advances in the field of membrane technologies for wastewater treatment.  

Dr. Shuang Hao
Dr. Tianqi Zhang
Prof. Dr. Zhiqian Jia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Membranes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • membrane formation/structure
  • membrane processes/applications
  • wastewater treatment
  • water reuse and desalination
  • membrane fouling

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

20 pages, 4841 KiB  
Article
Applying Nanofiltration to Decrease Energy Consumption and Sensitivity toward Feed Composition Fluctuations in Salt Production
by Marian Turek, Krzysztof Mitko and Paweł Skóra
Membranes 2024, 14(5), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/membranes14050103 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 712
Abstract
The only currently active industrial-scale plant that uses coal mine brines, located in Czerwionka-Leszczyny, uses ZOD (Zakład Odsalania Dębieńsko, the name of the plant’s former owner) technology, based on mechanical vapor compression evaporators. The plant produces evaporated salt that meets the specifications for [...] Read more.
The only currently active industrial-scale plant that uses coal mine brines, located in Czerwionka-Leszczyny, uses ZOD (Zakład Odsalania Dębieńsko, the name of the plant’s former owner) technology, based on mechanical vapor compression evaporators. The plant produces evaporated salt that meets the specifications for edible salt; however, the technology is highly energy-consuming. The presented work focuses on the modeling of ZOD technology if applied to the water treatment of the ‘Ziemowit-650’ coal mine. Using the results of bench-scale investigation of brine nanofiltration and a mathematical model of ZOD technology based on Czerwionka-Leszczyny performance, the energy consumption per ton of produced salt was estimated for two cases: (1) ZOD technology treating the ‘Ziemowit-650’ brine and (2) ZOD technology treating the permeate of nanofiltration (NF) working on the ‘Ziemowit-650’ brine. The sensitivity of the system was investigated in the range of −10% to + 10% of Cl, SO42−, Mg2+, and Ca2+ concentration, assuming that the sodium concentration also changes to meet the electroneutrality requirement. The results show that nanofiltration pretreatment not only decreases energy consumption but it also makes salt production less sensitive to fluctuations in feed water composition. Full article
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