Advanced Materials for Magnetic Cooling

A special issue of Magnetochemistry (ISSN 2312-7481). This special issue belongs to the section "Magnetic Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 4940

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
LIBPhys-UC, Department of Physics, University of Coimbra, P-3004-516 Coimbra, Portugal
Interests: synthesis of nanoparticles and characterization; magnetocalorics; electrical dielectric materials; structure and magnetism of low-dimensional systems; structure–property correlation of functional materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic refrigeration has the potential to mitigate long-standing refrigeration challenges such as high energy waste (up to 30% improvement), low system performance, and the impact on climate due to the refrigerant greenhouse effect. Magnetic cooling systems have better performance when operating under low temperatures and high magnetic fields, which negatively impacts its wide adoption to replace conventional refrigeration systems. Magnetic materials, in general, exhibit a magnetocaloric effect; however, this effect is normally weak at room temperature. Recent advancements in MCE have focused on introducing a phase transition within the room temperature range to ensure large isothermal magnetic entropy at room temperature. Despite the possibility of observing a reasonably high MCE at room temperature, the requirement to apply a high magnetic field to induce such an effect significantly limits its applicability. 

In the present Special Issue, we invite investigators to submit papers that discuss synthesis and structure combined with investigations of the chemical and physical properties of bulk forms, single crystals, thin films, and nanomaterials, contributing to the development of areas of current scientific interest. The potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • The structure and magnetism of low-dimensional systems.
  • The collective and intrinsic magnetism of size-selected nanoparticles and core/shell colloids.
  • The structure–property correlation of functional materials.
  • High-resolution structural/compositional analysis by transmission electron microscopy.
  • Electrical dielectric materials.
  • Magnetocaloric effects.
  • The synthesis of nanoparticles and characterization.
  • Phase separation and colossal magnetoresistance.

Dr. Mourad Smari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Magnetochemistry is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy-efficient cooling
  • bulk materials
  • intermetallic materials
  • thin films
  • magnetocaloric effect

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

15 pages, 3940 KiB  
Article
Effect of Composition on the Phase Structure and Magnetic Properties of Ball-Milled LaFe11.71-xMnxSi1.29H1.6 Magnetocaloric Powders
by Jamieson Brechtl, Michael R. Koehler, Michael S. Kesler, Hunter B. Henderson, Alexander A. Baker, Kai Li, James Kiggans, Kashif Nawaz, Orlando Rios and Ayyoub M. Momen
Magnetochemistry 2021, 7(9), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry7090132 - 21 Sep 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2011
Abstract
Magnetocaloric alloys are an important class of materials that enable non-vapor compression cycles. One promising candidate for magnetocaloric systems is LaFeMnSi, thanks to a combination of factors including low-cost constituents and a useful curie temperature, although control of the constituents’ phase distribution can [...] Read more.
Magnetocaloric alloys are an important class of materials that enable non-vapor compression cycles. One promising candidate for magnetocaloric systems is LaFeMnSi, thanks to a combination of factors including low-cost constituents and a useful curie temperature, although control of the constituents’ phase distribution can be challenging. In this paper, the effects of composition and high energy ball milling on the particle morphology and phase stability of LaFe11.71-xMnxSi1.29H1.6 magnetocaloric powders were investigated. The powders were characterized with optical microscopy, dynamic light scattering, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). It was found that the powders retained most of their original magnetocaloric phase during milling, although milling reduced the degree of crystallinity in the powder. Furthermore, some oxide phases (<1 weight percent) were present in the as-received and milled powders, which indicates that no significant contamination of the powders occurred during milling. Finally, the results indicated that the Curie temperature drops as Fe content decreases (Mn content increases). In all of the powders, milling led to an increase in the Curie temperature of ~3–6 °C. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Magnetic Cooling)
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12 pages, 5479 KiB  
Article
Deciphering the Structural Characterization, Hirshfeld Surface Analysis, Raman Studies, and Temperature-Dependent Magnetodielectric Properties of BiMn2O5
by Houda Felhi, Mourad Smari, Saber Mansouri, Jalel Massoudi and Essebti Dhahri
Magnetochemistry 2021, 7(5), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/magnetochemistry7050068 - 16 May 2021
Viewed by 1831
Abstract
We investigate the structural, Hirshfeld surface, magnetic, and magnetodielectric properties of BiMn2O5. The sample can be indexed with an orthorhombic phase associated with space group Pbam, with crystallographic parameters a = 7.54946 Å, b = 8.54962 Å and [...] Read more.
We investigate the structural, Hirshfeld surface, magnetic, and magnetodielectric properties of BiMn2O5. The sample can be indexed with an orthorhombic phase associated with space group Pbam, with crystallographic parameters a = 7.54946 Å, b = 8.54962 Å and c = 5.753627 Å. The Hirshfeld surface analysis, associated with 2D fingerprint plots, was used to visualize and explore the significant intermolecular interactions in the crystal structure quantitatively. The Raman spectra, measured from 6 to 300 K in a frequency range between 250 and 750 cm−1, exhibit good agreement between the SHELL model calculations and the experimental measurement of the proximity of the phonon frequencies for our sample. Furthermore, magnetic measurements show that BiMn2O5 becomes antiferromagnetic below the Néel temperature (TN)—the temperature above which an antiferromagnetic material becomes paramagnetic (TN = 31 K). The relaxation at intermediate temperatures (200–300 K) can be attributed to the polar jump process at two charge transfer sites between the Mn3+ and Mn4+ ions, which, in combination with the special arrangement of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ions, is likely to produce the strong intrinsic magnetodielectric effect (MD) in the same temperature range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Materials for Magnetic Cooling)
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