Hydration Lubrication in Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Lubricants (ISSN 2075-4442).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1067

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou, China
Interests: slip boundary condition; drag reduction; wetting; fricition; hydration lubrication; interfacial water

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The lubrication efficiency of articular cartilage is exceptionally high. Currently, no artificial lubrication system can surpass the efficiency of articular cartilage. In recent years, hydration lubrication has been considered the core mechanism of articular cartilage lubrication. However, all conclusions are based on indirect inferences from experiments. More studies using molecular dynamic simulations and experiments are needed to obtain insights into the lubrication process and mechanisms of articular lubrication at the atomic scale. This Special Issue is dedicated to advancing innovative research in molecular dynamics simulations,experiments and multiscale simulation methods in articular cartilage lubrication.

Dr. Luyao Bao
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • articular cartilage
  • phosphorylcholine
  • hydration
  • friction
  • self-assembly
  • molecular dynamics simulations
  • multiscale model

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 1995 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Splayed Lipid Molecules on Lubrication by Lipid Bilayers
by Di Jin and Jacob Klein
Lubricants 2024, 12(4), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/lubricants12040120 - 5 Apr 2024
Viewed by 843
Abstract
The outstanding lubrication of articular cartilage in the major synovial joints such as hips and knees, essential for the joint well-being, has been attributed to boundary layers of lipids at the outer cartilage surfaces, which have very low friction mediated by the hydration [...] Read more.
The outstanding lubrication of articular cartilage in the major synovial joints such as hips and knees, essential for the joint well-being, has been attributed to boundary layers of lipids at the outer cartilage surfaces, which have very low friction mediated by the hydration lubrication mechanism at their highly hydrated exposed headgroups. However, the role of spontaneously present lipid splays—lipids with an acyl tail in each of the opposing bilayers—in modulating the frictional force between lipid bilayers has not, to date, been considered. In this study, we perform all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to quantitatively assess the significance of splayed molecules within the framework of lubricating lipid bilayers. We demonstrate that, although transient, splayed molecules significantly increase the inter-membrane friction until their retraction back into the lamellar phase, with this effect more steadily occurring at lower sliding velocities that are comparable to the physiological velocities of sliding articular cartilage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydration Lubrication in Biomedical Applications)
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