Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy: What's New

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Methodology, Drug and Device Discovery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 2551

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Pharmaceutics and Translational Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
Interests: liposomes; nanoparticles; nanomedicine; drug delivery; microencapsulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I am honored to serve as a Guest Editor for this Special Issue of the Journal of Personalized Medicine entitled “Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy: What's New”. Despite the significant progress achieved in the field of personalized cancer nanomedicine, the gap is still wide between preclinical research and clinical application. In addition, the potential of discovering several milestone pathways in the battle against cancer, including the inhibition of PD-1 and CTLA-4 by immune checkpoint inhibitors, CRIPR/Cas9 gene editing machinery, and novel tumor targeting approaches, is expected to be fully unleashed when these advanced therapeutics are combined with the clinical application of personalized nanomedicine. Several barriers that slow down the translation of nanomedicine-based research to the clinic need to be rationally discussed and investigated. Research in this field should not only focus on developing new and ‘smarter’ therapeutics, but also should extend to developing new ex vivo and in vivo cancer models, utilizing techniques such as 3D printing and bioprinting, and high-throughput screening, genotyping, and sequencing, to accurately represent patient-to-patient tumor heterogeneity and individual variability. Advances in nanomedicine application should not only be restricted to cancer therapy, but also extend to imaging and diagnostics. In this new Special Issue, we welcome review or research articles on novel trends in personalized cancer nanomedicine, especially when combined with new treatment venues with small molecules, macromolecules, and gene therapy, state-of-the-art technologies such as 3D bioprinting, and advanced theranostics.

Dr. Youssef W. Naguib
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanomedicine
  • enhanced permeation and retention
  • theranostics
  • controlled release
  • combination therapy
  • gene therapy
  • CRISPR/Cas9
  • immune checkpoint inhibitors
  • 3D printing
  • liposomes
  • nanoparticles
  • smart polymers
  • tumor targeting

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

23 pages, 4335 KiB  
Review
Inhibitors of Immune Checkpoints: Small Molecule- and Peptide-Based Approaches
by Natalie Fuchs, Longfei Zhang, Laura Calvo-Barreiro, Katarzyna Kuncewicz and Moustafa Gabr
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(1), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14010068 - 4 Jan 2024
Viewed by 2256
Abstract
The revolutionary progress in cancer immunotherapy, particularly the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors, marks a significant milestone in the fight against malignancies. However, the majority of clinically employed immune checkpoint inhibitors are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with several limitations, such as poor oral bioavailability [...] Read more.
The revolutionary progress in cancer immunotherapy, particularly the advent of immune checkpoint inhibitors, marks a significant milestone in the fight against malignancies. However, the majority of clinically employed immune checkpoint inhibitors are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with several limitations, such as poor oral bioavailability and immune-related adverse effects (irAEs). Another major limitation is the restriction of the efficacy of mAbs to a subset of cancer patients, which triggered extensive research efforts to identify alternative approaches in targeting immune checkpoints aiming to overcome the restricted efficacy of mAbs. This comprehensive review aims to explore the cutting-edge developments in targeting immune checkpoints, focusing on both small molecule- and peptide-based approaches. By delving into drug discovery platforms, we provide insights into the diverse strategies employed to identify and optimize small molecules and peptides as inhibitors of immune checkpoints. In addition, we discuss recent advances in nanomaterials as drug carriers, providing a basis for the development of small molecule- and peptide-based platforms for cancer immunotherapy. Ongoing research focused on the discovery of small molecules and peptide-inspired agents targeting immune checkpoints paves the way for developing orally bioavailable agents as the next-generation cancer immunotherapies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomedicine in Cancer Therapy: What's New)
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