New Perspectives and Future Directions in Management of Chronic Respiratory Diseases

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Medicine, Cell, and Organism Physiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2024 | Viewed by 1371

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Pneumology, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Iuliu Hatieganu", 400332 Cluj-Napoca, Romania
Interests: chronic respiratory diseases/COPD; asthma; sleep medicine; interstitial lung diseases; pulmonary infections; sarcoidosis; tabacology; life style medicine
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Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine, Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju 26426, Republic of Korea
Interests: COPD; severe asthma; bronchiectasis; chronic cough

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Chronic respiratory diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), interstitial lung diseases, pneumonitis, sarcoidosis, and other lung conditions, represent a major challenge of health systems around the world. In 2017, it was estimated that 545 million people suffer from a chronic respiratory disease, demonstrating an increase of almost 40% since 1990, and these chronic respiratory diseases were the third leading cause of death.

This type of disorders affects the lungs and other parts of the respiratory system, and slowly spreads over several years. Smoking tobacco, second-hand smoking, chemical fumes, dust, and other variants of air pollution are involved in the development and progression of these disease. Beside them, behavioral risk factors and metabolic risk factors contribute to the progression and increase the risk of exacerbations.

According to WHO, around the world, there is a desire to reduce the morbidity, disability, and premature mortality related to respiratory disease because it is well known that these diseases have frequent exacerbations and impact the quality of life of patients and medical systems, resulting in high hospitalization costs.

To our knowledge, the underlying mechanisms are not completely discovered and described, as the diagnosis of chronic respiratory diseases in an advanced stage and the existing definition could be misleading. To handle with the reversion and disease progression achieving lung parenchyma regeneration, there is a rapid need for finding an efficient treatment. Understanding the pathophysiology and the molecular mechanisms could help in the identification of potential and novel targets for reversing disease degeneration.

This Special Issue aims to identify new strategies focused on the diagnosis and personalized treatment of chronic respiratory diseases regarding each disease and stage of it, with varying impacts on prognosis and mortality.

Prof. Dr. Doina Adina Todea
Dr. Ji-Ho Lee
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • chronic respiratory diseases
  • biomarkers
  • pathophysiology and molecular mechanisms
  • risk factors
  • comorbidities
  • personalized treatment
  • quality of life
  • prognosis and mortality

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 1618 KiB  
Article
Inhaled Corticosteroids and the Risk of Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Findings from a Nationwide Population-Based Study
by Iseul Yu, Se Hwa Hong, Min-Seok Chang, Seok Jeong Lee, Suk Joong Yong, Won-Yeon Lee, Sang-Ha Kim and Ji-Ho Lee
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(7), 1088; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13071088 - 30 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1140
Abstract
Studies have shown increased nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTM) incidence with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use in patients with chronic respiratory diseases; however, this association in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains insufficiently studied. Using a nationwide population-based database of the Korean National Health [...] Read more.
Studies have shown increased nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTM) incidence with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) use in patients with chronic respiratory diseases; however, this association in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains insufficiently studied. Using a nationwide population-based database of the Korean National Health Insurance Service, newly diagnosed COPD patients (2005–2018) treated with inhaled bronchodilators were selected. An NTM case was defined by the presence of the first diagnostic code following inhaled bronchodilator use. Results indicated that ICS users did not have an increased risk of NTM disease compared to non-ICS users (hazard ratio (HR), 1.121; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.950–1.323; p = 0.176). However, in a subgroup analysis, the highest quartile of the cumulative ICS dose was associated with the development of NTM (1.200, 0.950–1.323, p = 0.050). Medium (1.229, 1.008–1.499, p = 0.041) and high daily doses of ICS (1.637, 1.241–2.160, p < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of NTM disease. There was no difference in the risk of NTM according to ICS type. ICS use may increase the risk of developing NTM disease in patients with COPD. Physicians should weigh the potential benefits and risks of ICS, especially when using high doses and prolonged durations. Full article
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