Sex and Gender-Related Issues in the Era of Personalized Medicine

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Sex, Gender and Hormone Based Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 22 September 2024 | Viewed by 3816

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. UOSD Spinal Surgery, AOU Policlinico di Bari, Bari, Italy
2. Department DiMePre-J, University of Bari "Aldo Moro", Bari, Italy
Interests: scoliosis; kyphosis; spine fractures; degenerative disk diseases; spinal surgery; spinal tumours; spine metastasis; osteoarthritis; tendinopathy; omic sciences; proteomics; metabolomics; PRP; PDRN; mesenchymal stem cells; gender-medicine; gender-related differences; MRI; biophysical stimulation; CCEFs; PEMFs; vertebral bone marrow edema; precision medicine; osteoporosis; osteosarcopenia

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Guest Editor
President of International Society for Gender Medicine (IGM), President of Gruppo Italiano Salute e Genere (GISeG), Department of Pneumology, Santa Maria Hospital, Via De Ferrariis 18/D, 70124 Bari, Italy
Interests: pneumologia; lung diseases; gender-related differences; sex-related differences; gender indicators; precision medicine

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Guest Editor
Orthopaedic and Trauma Unit, Department DiBraiN, University of Bari "Aldo Moro ", Bari, Italy
Interests: trauma; orthopedic surgery; arthroplasty; rehabilitation; tendon; physical activity; osteoarthritis; osteoporosis; fragility fractures; biophysical stimulation; gender-related differences; musculoskeletal diseases
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gender medicine studies sex- and gender-based differences in the development and prevention of diseases, the awareness and presentation of symptoms, and the effectiveness of therapy. Gender medicine is a part of personalized medicine, considering differences in biological and psychosocial factors individually. There are differences in genes, chromosomes, hormones, and metabolism as well as differences in culture, environment, and society. There are prominent differences between men and women in medicine regarding the immune system, inflammation, and noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease.

In this Special Issue, we will offer investigators and clinical practitioners operating in multiple fields of medicine and nursing care the opportunity to report and share their personal experience and research data from gender medicine and gender factors/differences in women and men. We welcome original studies and review papers.

Dr. Davide Bizzoca
Dr. Anna Maria Moretti 
Prof. Dr. Biagio Moretti 
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

 

Keywords

  • gender
  • sex differences
  • sex factors
  • personalized medicine
  • cardiovascular disease
  • hypertension
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • psychiatry and psychology
  • public health and epidemiology
  • women’s health
  • sex
  • osteoporosis
  • osteoarthritis
  • musculoskeletal diseases

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 620 KiB  
Article
Sex Differences in Albumin Quotient and Cerebrospinal Fluid Total Protein Content Do Not Depend on Anthropometric Factors
by Massimiliano Castellazzi, Raffaella Candeloro, Caterina Trevisan, Samantha Permunian, Gaia Buscemi, Sara Ghisellini, Giovanna Negri, Giada Gilli, Caterina Ferri, Tiziana Bellini, Stefano Pizzicotti and Maura Pugliatti
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(4), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14040362 - 29 Mar 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum albumin quotient (QAlb) and CSF total protein (TP) are more elevated in males than females, and this has been hypothesised to be due to anthropometric differences between the sexes. This study aimed to investigate QAlb and CSF TP [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/serum albumin quotient (QAlb) and CSF total protein (TP) are more elevated in males than females, and this has been hypothesised to be due to anthropometric differences between the sexes. This study aimed to investigate QAlb and CSF TP as a function of body height, weight, and body mass index (BMI). (2) Methods: A total of 207 patients were included in the study and analysed blinded to clinical diagnosis. (3) Results: Multivariable linear regressions were run to predict log-transformed Qalb and log-transformed CSF TP value from age, sex, weight, and height (first model) or from age, sex, and BMI (second model). In both models, age (β = 0.004, 95% CI = 0.002 to 0.006) and sex (β = −0.095, 95% CI = −0.169 to −0.021, and β = −0.135, 95% CI = −0.191 to −0.079) were significant predictors for QAlb, but weight, height, and BMI were not. Similarly, age (β = 0.004, 95% CI = 0.003 to 0.006) and sex (β = −0.077, 95% CI = −0.142 to −0.013, and β = −0.109, 95% CI = −0.157 to −0.060) were significant predictors for CSF TP, while anthropometric characteristics were not. No differences in QAlb and CSF TP were found when grouping males and females by BMI status. (4) Conclusions: Our data suggest that anthropometric characteristics could not explain the sex-related differences in QAlb and CSF TP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex and Gender-Related Issues in the Era of Personalized Medicine)
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11 pages, 1203 KiB  
Article
Exploring Pelvic Symptom Dynamics in Relation to the Menstrual Cycle: Implications for Clinical Assessment and Management
by Maria Blanco-Diaz, Ana Vielva-Gomez, Marina Legasa-Susperregui, Borja Perez-Dominguez, Esther M. Medrano-Sánchez and Esther Diaz-Mohedo
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(3), 239; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14030239 - 23 Feb 2024
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Abstract
Background: Pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFDs) encompass an array of conditions with discrepant classification systems, hampering accurate prevalence estimation. Despite potentially affecting up to 25% of women during their lifetime, many remain undiagnosed, underestimating the true extent. Objectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to examine [...] Read more.
Background: Pelvic floor dysfunctions (PFDs) encompass an array of conditions with discrepant classification systems, hampering accurate prevalence estimation. Despite potentially affecting up to 25% of women during their lifetime, many remain undiagnosed, underestimating the true extent. Objectives: This cross-sectional study aimed to examine the impacts of the menstrual cycle on PFDs and dysfunctions. Secondary objectives included investigating differences between athletic and nonathletic women. Methods: An online questionnaire examined the effects of the menstrual cycle (MC) on 477 women’s pelvic symptoms (aged 16–63 years), stratified by athletic status. This ad hoc instrument built upon a validated screening tool for female athletes. Results: Most participants reported symptom fluctuations across menstrual phases, with many modifying or reducing exercise participation. A concerning number experienced daily undiagnosed pelvic floor symptoms, emphasizing needs for comprehensive medical evaluation. Conclusions: Exacerbated pelvic symptoms showed complex relationships with menstruation, highlighting the importance of considering the MC in customized clinical management approaches. Symptoms demonstrated differential links to menstruation, indicating needs for individualized evaluation and tailored treatment plans based on symptom profiles and hormonal interactions. Educating professionals and patients remains essential to enhancing awareness, detection, and therapeutic outcomes. Further controlled longitudinal research should elucidate intricate relationships between menstrual cycles and pelvic symptom variability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex and Gender-Related Issues in the Era of Personalized Medicine)
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12 pages, 292 KiB  
Article
Sex Differences in the Atherogenic Risk Index in Healthy Mexican Population and Its Relationship with Anthropometric and Psychological Factors
by Aniel Jessica Leticia Brambila-Tapia, Ingrid Patricia Dávalos-Rodríguez, Carlos Adán Méndez-García, Frida Isadora Bárcenas-Robles and Itzae Adonai Gutiérrez-Hurtado
J. Pers. Med. 2023, 13(10), 1452; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm13101452 - 29 Sep 2023
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Abstract
Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality; however, the association of this variable with a wide range of personal and psychological variables has not been researched. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare lipid levels and anthropometric measures [...] Read more.
Dyslipidemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and mortality; however, the association of this variable with a wide range of personal and psychological variables has not been researched. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare lipid levels and anthropometric measures between sexes and to determine the association between personal and psychological variables with the atherogenic risk index (ARI). An adult population which auto-reported as healthy was invited to participate via social media and in person. They filled out a questionnaire with personal and psychological variables; in addition, the body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were measured, and a blood sample was obtained to determine serum lipids. A total of 172 participants were included, from which 92 (53.49%) were women; both sexes were comparable in age and most sociodemographic values. Men showed significantly higher levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, ARI, and lower levels of HDL cholesterol. The men also showed higher values of WHR than the women. In the bivariate analysis, ARI showed the highest correlation with WHR (r = 0.664) in the men and with BMI (r = 0.619) in the women. In the multivariate analysis, the quality of food intake was negatively correlated with ARI in the global and women’s samples, and the psychological variables of assertiveness and positive relations with others were negatively correlated with ARI in women, while purpose in life was negatively correlated with ARI in men. In conclusion, the higher levels of serum lipids and ARI in men can be explained by the higher values of WHR in this sex. Behavioral and psychological variables could be protective factors for high ARI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sex and Gender-Related Issues in the Era of Personalized Medicine)
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