Personalized Management in Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis

A special issue of Journal of Personalized Medicine (ISSN 2075-4426). This special issue belongs to the section "Personalized Therapy and Drug Delivery".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 1419

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
1. Dermatology Unit, IRCCS Humanitas Research Hospital, Milan, Italy
2. Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Milan, Italy
Interests: psoriasis; atopic dermatitis; hidradenitis suppurativa; melanoma; non-melanoma skin cancers; confocal microscopy

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Guest Editor
1. Dermatology Unit, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, 20072 Pieve Emanuele, Italy
2. Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Scientific Institute for Research, Hospitalization and Healthcare, 20089 Rozzano, Italy
Interests: skin; psoriasis; atopic dermatitis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The development of a multitude of biological drugs and small molecules (e.g., JAK inhibitors) has led to a paradigm shift in the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. These drugs are changing the lives of millions of dermatological patients around the world, and they are also helping clinicians to better understand the pathophysiology of several immune-mediated cutaneous diseases, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, chronic urticaria, and hidradenitis suppurativa; however, data are still limited on the place in therapy of different drugs in each subpopulation of patients, according to comorbidities, disease severity, and previous exposure to other systemic drugs. Furthermore, the search for biomarkers that might help with classification and therapy selection is still ongoing. In this Special Issue, we will focus on new drugs for the treatment of psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, with a particular interest in real-world experiences, with the aim to explore possible tailor-made treatments for each patient. Both original research manuscripts and reviews, as well as short communications, are welcome to be submitted, to offer readers innovative perspectives on a patient-targeted approach for managing psoriasis and atopic dermatitis.

Dr. Mario Valenti
Prof. Dr. Antonio Costanzo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Personalized Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • inflammatory skin diseases
  • immune-mediated diseases
  • psoriasis
  • psoriatic arthritis
  • atopic dermatitis
  • biologics
  • JAK inhibitors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

10 pages, 553 KiB  
Article
Effectiveness and Safety of Biological Therapies in Very Severe Plaque Psoriasis: A Real-Life Retrospective Study
by Giovanni Fiorillo, Luciano Ibba, Luigi Gargiulo, Alessandra Narcisi, Antonio Costanzo and Mario Valenti
J. Pers. Med. 2024, 14(2), 186; https://doi.org/10.3390/jpm14020186 - 7 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1089
Abstract
Psoriasis can have a significant impact on quality of life and productivity, especially with increased severity. However, there is limited evidence on biologics’ efficacy in highly severe cases compared to moderate-to-severe ones. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of novel [...] Read more.
Psoriasis can have a significant impact on quality of life and productivity, especially with increased severity. However, there is limited evidence on biologics’ efficacy in highly severe cases compared to moderate-to-severe ones. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of novel biological therapies in very severe psoriasis. We conducted a retrospective analysis on patients ≥ 18 years old affected by very severe psoriasis who had received a biological agent for at least 16 weeks. We used PASI to assess disease severity and effectiveness at weeks 16, 52, 104, and 156. Safety was evaluated by tracking treatment discontinuation rates and adverse events. This study included 29 males and 11 females, with a mean age of 55.80 years (SD 13.82). Cardiometabolic diseases were the most common comorbidities (25.00%). Twenty-eight (70.00%) patients had psoriasis involvement in at least one difficult-to-treat area. All patients completed 16 weeks of treatment. The mean PASI was 31.60 (SD 2.57) at baseline, 3.48 (SD 4.13) at week 16, 0.58 (SD 1.70) at week 52, 0.77 (SD 1.66) at week 104, and 1.29 (SD 2.12) at week 156. PASI90 and 100 were achieved by 52.50% and 30.00% of patients at week 16, by 96.15% and 80.77% at week 52, by 93.33% and 66.67% at week 104, and by 85.71% and 42.86% at week 156. PASIs ≤ 2 were achieved by 50.00% of patients at week 16, 88.46% at week 52, 86.67% at week 104, and 85.71% at week 156. Only two patients discontinued biologics due to complete remission, and mild AEs were reported by four patients. Our findings show that biologics are effective and well tolerated for treating very severe psoriasis, maintaining long-term effectiveness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Personalized Management in Psoriasis and Atopic Dermatitis)
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