Marine Omics & Biotechnology

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Marine Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2024) | Viewed by 10330

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: evolutionary biology; genomics; arthropods; cnidarians; invertebrates

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Life Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China
Interests: molecular marine biology and biotechnology; crustacean biology and genomics; systematics and biogeography; fisheries and aquaculture; pollution biology; seafood allergy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute a research article and/or review article to the Special Issue “Marine Omics and Biotechnology” in the Journal of Marine Science and Engineering.

Omics aims at collective characterization and quantification of biological molecules to reveal the structure and function of different organisms. The recent advancement in different kinds of omics, including but not limited to genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, proteomics, glycomics, and metabolomics, have certainly improved our understanding of different life forms in the marine ecosystem.

On the other hand, marine biotechnology, building on the new knowledge gained from omics to develop technology to utilize the marine biological systems and living organisms, has great potential in improving the environment or even for industry application.

In this Special Issue, we welcome manuscripts related to the use of omics in basic or applied marine sciences. The submission deadline is currently set to 30 September 2021; however, late submission will also be considered given the current pandemic situation.

Should you be interested in contributing a research article and/or review, please do not hesitate to contact us at jeromehui@cuhk.edu.hk and kahouchu@cuhk.edu.hk.

Prof. Jerome Ho Lam Hui
Prof. Dr. Ka Hou Chu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Genomics
  • Proteomics
  • Transcriptomics
  • Epigenomics
  • Lipidomics
  • Glycomics
  • Metabolomics
  • Bioinformatics
  • Biotechnology

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2513 KiB  
Article
Transcriptome Analysis of Multiple Tissues in the Shrimp Penaeus vannamei Reveals the Typical Physiological Response to Three Pathogens
by Ziwei Wu, Ka Hou Chu and Ka Yan Ma
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2023, 11(2), 389; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse11020389 - 09 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1828
Abstract
Penaeid shrimp aquaculture is impacted by various diseases. However, most published studies on physiological responses to pathogens have focused on the changes in one or two tissues of shrimp infected by a single pathogen, or the effects of two pathogens infecting the shrimp [...] Read more.
Penaeid shrimp aquaculture is impacted by various diseases. However, most published studies on physiological responses to pathogens have focused on the changes in one or two tissues of shrimp infected by a single pathogen, or the effects of two pathogens infecting the shrimp in a single tissue. There has been limited systematic examination on the similarities and differences of immune responses in multiple tissues under various pathogen infection. Here, the transcriptomic changes of three immune tissues (gill, hepatopancreas and hemocytes) under the infection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), Vibrio parahaemolyticus acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (VPAHPND), and decapod iridovirus 1 (DIV1) were examined to provide new insights regarding the immune responses of the most important cultured shrimp, Penaeus vannamei. The results showed tissue-specific differences in the immune responses of shrimp tissues. The significant differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in gill are mainly related to environmental information processing and cellular processes. The DEGs in hemocytes are mostly involved in cellular processes, while those in hepatopancreas are primarily associated with metabolism. In addition, cytoskeleton-related proteins, MAPK signaling pathway, complement and coagulation level pathway, and thermogenesis may play key roles in the shrimp–pathogen interactions across tissues. These findings shed light on the typical immune responses of Penaeus vannamei under the infection of pathogens and contribute to the sustainable development of penaeid shrimp farming. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Omics & Biotechnology)
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16 pages, 3857 KiB  
Article
Population Genomics, Transcriptional Response to Heat Shock, and Gut Microbiota of the Hong Kong Oyster Magallana hongkongensis
by Yichun Xie, Elaine Y. Y. Huang, Wenyan Nong, Sean T. S. Law, Yifei Yu, Khan Cheung, Yiqian Li, Cheuk Fung Wong, Ho Yin Yip, Patrick W. S. Joyce, King Ming Chan, Ka Hou Chu, Bayden D. Russell, Laura J. Falkenberg and Jerome H. L. Hui
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2022, 10(2), 237; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse10020237 - 10 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2747
Abstract
The Hong Kong oyster Magallana hongkongensis, previously known as Crassostrea hongkongensis, is a true oyster species native to the estuarine-coast of the Pearl River Delta in southern China. The species—with scientific, ecological, cultural, and nutritional importance—has been farmed for hundreds of [...] Read more.
The Hong Kong oyster Magallana hongkongensis, previously known as Crassostrea hongkongensis, is a true oyster species native to the estuarine-coast of the Pearl River Delta in southern China. The species—with scientific, ecological, cultural, and nutritional importance—has been farmed for hundreds of years. However, there is only limited information on its genetics, stress adaptation mechanisms, and gut microbiota, restricting the sustainable production and use of oyster resources. Here, we present population structure analysis on M. hongkongensis oysters collected from Deep Bay and Lantau Island in Hong Kong, as well as transcriptome analysis on heat shock responses and the gut microbiota profile of M. hongkongensis oysters collected from Deep Bay. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including those on the homeobox genes and heat shock protein genes, were revealed by the whole genome resequencing. Transcriptomes of oysters incubated at 25 °C and 32 °C for 24 h were sequenced which revealed the heat-induced regulation of heat shock protein pathway genes. Furthermore, the gut microbe community was detected by 16S rRNA sequencing which identified Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria and Spirochaetes as the most abundant phyla. This study reveals the molecular basis for the adaptation of the oyster M. hongkongensis to environmental conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Omics & Biotechnology)
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15 pages, 2348 KiB  
Communication
Proteome Response of Meretrix Bivalves Hepatopancreas Exposed to Paralytic Shellfish Toxins Producing Dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum
by Kin-Ka Chan, Nora Fung-Yee Tam, Christie Ng, Celia Sze-Nga Kwok, Steven Jing-Liang Xu, Eric Tung-Po Sze and Fred Wang-Fat Lee
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 1039; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9091039 - 21 Sep 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2182
Abstract
Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) contamination of seafood has become a growing global problem. However, the molecular response of bivalves, some of the most popular seafoods, to PSP toxins has seldom been reported and the underlying molecular mechanisms of the interactions between Meretrix meretrix [...] Read more.
Paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs) contamination of seafood has become a growing global problem. However, the molecular response of bivalves, some of the most popular seafoods, to PSP toxins has seldom been reported and the underlying molecular mechanisms of the interactions between Meretrix meretrix bivalves and PSTs-producing dinoflagellates are scarcely known. This study compared the protein expression profiles between PSP toxin-contaminated and non-PSP toxin contaminated M. meretrix, determined proteome responses and identified potential biomarkers based on feeding experiments. Results showed that the content of total PSP toxins in contaminated bivalves was 40.63 ± 4.08 μg saxitoxin (STX) equivalents per gram, with 95.3% in hepatopancreas, followed by gill (1.82%) and foot (1.79%). According to two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), 15 differentially expressed proteins (at least 2-fold difference) between the hepatopancreas of bivalves with and without PSP toxins were detected. Eight of them were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF MS. These were catalase, protein ultraspiracle homolog, G2 and S phase-expression protein, paramyosin, Mn-superoxide dismutase, response regulator receiver domain-containing protein, sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein and major facilitator superfamily transporters. The differences in the expression levels of the last three proteins involving in cell signaling, structure and membrane transport were 4.2, 5.3 and 4.9-fold, respectively. These proteins could be further developed as potential biomarkers. The other two up-regulated proteins, Mn-superoxide dismutase and catalase, were involved in cell defence mechanisms against oxidative stress, suggesting PSP toxin acts as xenobiotics and poses oxidative stress in bivalves. This study gives insights into the response of bivalves to PSP toxin-producing dinoflagellate at the proteomic level and the potential of using 2-DE to develop specific protein markers in bivalves. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Omics & Biotechnology)
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14 pages, 2107 KiB  
Article
Glutathione S-Transferases in Marine Copepods
by Chiara Lauritano, Ylenia Carotenuto and Vittoria Roncalli
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2021, 9(9), 1025; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse9091025 - 18 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2276
Abstract
The glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a complex family of phase II detoxification enzymes, known for their ability to catalyze the conjugation of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) to a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous electrophilic compounds for detoxification purposes. In marine [...] Read more.
The glutathione S-transferase (GST) is a complex family of phase II detoxification enzymes, known for their ability to catalyze the conjugation of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) to a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous electrophilic compounds for detoxification purposes. In marine environments, copepods are constantly exposed to multiple exogenous stressors, thus their capability of detoxification is key for survival. Full identification of the GST family in copepods has been limited only to few species. As for insects, the GST family includes a wide range of genes that, based on their cellular localization, can be divided in three classes: cytosolic, microsomal, and mitochondrial. The role of GSTs might have class-specific features, thus understanding the nature of the GST family has become crucial. This paper covers information of the GST activity in marine copepods based on studies investigating gene expression, protein content, and enzymatic activity. Using published literature and mining new publicly available transcriptomes, we characterized the multiplicity of the GST family in copepods from different orders and families, highlighting the possible role of these genes as biomarker for ocean health status monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Marine Omics & Biotechnology)
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