Optimizing Strength and Resistance Training: Best Practices Applied to Sports Disciplines and Performance

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Athletic Training and Human Performance".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 June 2024 | Viewed by 1964

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
SEJ-680: Science-Based Training (SBT) Research Group, Faculty of Sports Sciences, Pablo de Olavide University, 41013 Seville, Spain
Interests: nutrition; strength; resistance exercise; isoinertial training; training optimization; physical performance; skeletal muscle; sports injuries; sports medicine
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sports Sciences, University of Extremadura, 10003 Caceres, Spain
Interests: strength; resistance exercise; isoinertial training; training optimization; physical performance; sports injuries; sports medicine; team sports performance; workload monitoring
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Strength training plays a fundamental role in enhancing the functional and muscular performance of the human body. Physical conditioning, the development of the ability to generate force and muscle power in a specific context and moment, as well as neuromuscular and structural adaptations, are key aspects that benefit from optimised strength training. This Special Issue will explore different methodologies, techniques and practices applied to strength training, focusing on the optimization of the training processes in order to achieve maximum performance, highlighting the need for careful planning for each individual and discipline.

In this regard, the correct application and optimization of strength training benefit not only practitioners of weight training disciplines, but also athletes in individual and team sports. In these contexts, the careful and precise application of methodology and training optimization becomes crucial, using appropriate techniques to maximize benefits and minimize the risk of injuries in athletes.

Therefore, this Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive and updated overview of the best practices and techniques applied to strength and resistance training, contributing to continuous advancement in sports performance optimization. Additionally, it seeks to provide valuable information for athletes, coaches and physical conditioning professionals. Original research papers and literature reviews are welcome.

Dr. Luis Manuel Martínez Aranda
Dr. Javier Raya-González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • skeletal muscle
  • muscle hypertrophy
  • resistance exercise
  • eccentric training
  • power output
  • plyometrics
  • strength adaptations
  • training volume
  • sports performance
  • conditioning

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

12 pages, 1260 KiB  
Article
Will Music Give Me Power? Effects of Listening to Music during Active and Passive Rest Intervals on Power Output during Resistance Exercise
by Agata Latocha, Jakub Jarosz, Jonatan Helbin and Michał Krzysztofik
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2024, 9(1), 32; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk9010032 - 16 Feb 2024
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Abstract
The study aimed to evaluate the impact of listening to preferred music during active/passive rest on power output and heart rate in barbell squats (BS) and bench presses (BP). Fifteen participants (13 males and 2 females), moderately resistance trained, were engaged in four [...] Read more.
The study aimed to evaluate the impact of listening to preferred music during active/passive rest on power output and heart rate in barbell squats (BS) and bench presses (BP). Fifteen participants (13 males and 2 females), moderately resistance trained, were engaged in four randomized experimental sessions with varying rest intervals (active/passive) and music presence (listening or not). Each session involved three sets of three repetitions of BS and BP at a 50% one-repetition maximum. ANOVA showed a significant main effect of the set for BP relative mean and peak power output (p < 0.001; both). The post hoc comparisons indicated a significantly higher BP relative mean and peak power output in set_2 (p < 0.001; effect size [ES] = 0.12 and p < 0.001; ES = 0.10) and set_3 (p < 0.001; ES = 0.11 and p = 0.001; ES = 0.16) in comparison to set_1. Moreover, a main effect of the set indicating a decrease in BS relative peak power output across sets was observed (p = 0.024) with no significant differences between sets. A significantly higher mean heart rate during active rest in comparison to passive rest was observed (p = 0.032; ES = 0.69). The results revealed no significant effect of listening to music on relative power output and heart rate during BS and BP. Full article
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