Clinical Advances in Urologic Oncology

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Nephrology & Urology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 499

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world of urologic oncology is rapidly evolving. Within the realm of bladder, prostate, kidney, testis and penile cancers, new treatment paradigms, medications and surgical modifications are evolving in parallel with progressive research on these topics. For example, in bladder cancer, novel intravesical and targeted therapies are gaining traction. For prostate cancer, advanced imaging and less invasive focal therapy has been increasingly utilized. These examples just begin to scratch the surface of the recent developments in our field. For this Special Issue, we encourage authors to submit papers on the recent clinical updates on urologic cancer of their interest.

Dr. Saum Ghodoussipour
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • bladder cancer
  • kidney cancer
  • prostate cancer
  • testis cancer
  • penile cancer
  • minimally invasive
  • cancer treatment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 255 KiB  
Article
Predictive Factors for Major Complications and Urological Cancer Diagnosis in Older Adults (≥80 Years) Admitted to the Emergency Department for Hematuria
by Mauro Ragonese, Daniele Fettucciari, Luigi Carbone, Filippo Gavi, Marco Montesi, Eros Scarciglia, Pierluigi Russo, Domenico Maria Sanesi, Filippo Marino, Nazario Foschi, Francesco Pinto, Francesco Franceschi, Marco Racioppi, Emilio Sacco and Marcello Covino
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(10), 2874; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13102874 - 13 May 2024
Viewed by 343
Abstract
Background: Gross Hematuria is a relevant cause of admission to the emergency department in the general population and particularly in older adults (≥80 years). This specific urological symptom is often underestimated and usually associated with benign conditions such as urinary infections or [...] Read more.
Background: Gross Hematuria is a relevant cause of admission to the emergency department in the general population and particularly in older adults (≥80 years). This specific urological symptom is often underestimated and usually associated with benign conditions such as urinary infections or poor hydration. Nevertheless, hematuria could lead to severe acute complications or be the first symptom of urological cancers. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed clinical data from 1169 patients aged ≥80 years consecutively admitted to the emergency department for hematuria. The primary endpoint of the study was to identify risk factors for major complications, and the secondary endpoint was to analyze risk factors for urological cancer diagnosis. The median age was 85 years (IQR 82–88 years), and 908 (77%) were males. Among them, 449 (38.4%) had a past medical history of urological neoplasm (kidney, ureter, bladder, prostate, or urethral cancer). Results: Overall, 87 patients (7.4%) had major complications (patient death, septic shock, and admission to the intensive care unit). Worse vital signs at admission, fever, and confusion (p < 0.001, OR 18.0 IC 95% [5.5–58.7]; p = 0.015, OR 2.0 IC 95% [1.1–3.5]; p = <0.001, OR 4.2 IC 95% [1.9–3.5], respectively), as well as lower hemoglobin values and higher Charlson comorbidity index (p < 0.001, OR 0.8 IC 95% [0.7–0.9]), p = 0.002, OR = 1.2 [1.1–1.3]) were independent predictive factors for major complications. The multivariate analysis identified as risk factors for diagnosis of urological cancer older age, male sex and higher comorbidity (OR 1.05 IC95% [1–1.09]; OR 2.19 IC95% [1.42–3.39] and OR 1.11 IC95% [1.2–1.2], respectively); interestingly the presence of indwelling vesical catheter (IVC) (OR 0.44 IC95% [0.24–0.82]) resulted as an independent factor for absence of urological cancers. Conclusions: Hematuria is a frequent symptom in older adults admitted to the emergency department. While this is often associated with benign conditions, there are some risk factors for major complications and for urological cancer that must be taken into account to identify the patients who need further evaluation or prompt hospital admission. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Clinical Advances in Urologic Oncology)
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