Risk Factors and Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

A special issue of Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease (ISSN 2308-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology, Lifestyle, and Cardiovascular Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 4831

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Paralympic Sports, Wroclaw University of Health and Sport Sciences, Witelona 25a, 51-617 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: general cardiology; electrocardiography; prevention; cardiovascular risk factors; environmental risk factors; sports medicine; sports cardiology; regeneration and recovery methods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the 21st century, cardiovascular diseases are still the leading causes of premature mortality and morbidity worldwide. This Special Issue aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the state of the art regarding classical and novel cardiovascular risk factors. The classical factors, which are known from the times of the Framingham study and the INTERHEART and INTERSTROKE studies, account for >90% of the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke. Based on these results, current strategies for the prevention of coronary artery disease and other cardiovascular diseases focus mainly on reducing body weight, blood LDL cholesterol concentration and blood pressure. However, our knowledge is still growing, and a significant amount of novel data has been gathered. Some classical solutions have been criticized; simultaneously, new concepts arise, including concerns about environmental and occupational factors, pollution and the contamination of food with the preservatives and chemical substances that accompany everyday life. These issues and numerous others regarding mental health, different aspects of physical activity and individual choices, including diet, may contribute to the complex background of the development of cardiovascular diseases.

We kindly invite research papers that will consolidate our understanding in this area. This Special Issue will publish full research articles and systematic reviews. Potential topics include the following research areas:

  • Cardiovascular classical risk factors;
  • Novel cardiovascular risk factors;
  • Environmental cardiovascular risk factors;
  • Occupational cardiovascular risk factors;
  • Prevention of cardiovascular risk factors;
  • Novel trends in cardiovascular risk factors.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit manuscripts on the topic of “Cardiovascular risk factors—a novel approach” for this Special Issue.

Dr. Małgorzata Poręba
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Cardiovascular Development and Disease is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular diseases
  • cardiovascular risk factors
  • smoking
  • hypertension
  • hypercholesterolemia
  • lipids
  • diabetes
  • obesity
  • overweight
  • diet
  • occupational factors

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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15 pages, 1099 KiB  
Review
Myocardial Late Gadolinium Enhancement (LGE) in Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CMR)—An Important Risk Marker for Cardiac Disease
by Claudia Meier, Michel Eisenblätter and Stephan Gielen
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11020040 - 26 Jan 2024
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Abstract
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has significantly revolutionized the comprehension and diagnosis of cardiac diseases, particularly through the utilization of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging for tissue characterization. LGE enables the visualization of expanded extracellular spaces in conditions such as fibrosis, fibrofatty tissue, or [...] Read more.
Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has significantly revolutionized the comprehension and diagnosis of cardiac diseases, particularly through the utilization of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) imaging for tissue characterization. LGE enables the visualization of expanded extracellular spaces in conditions such as fibrosis, fibrofatty tissue, or edema. The growing recognition of LGE’s prognostic capacity underscores its importance, evident in the increasing explicit recommendations within guidelines. Notably, the contemporary characterization of cardiomyopathies relies on LGE-based scar assessment by CMR to a large extent. This review describes the pattern and prognostic value of LGE in detail for various cardiac diseases. Despite its merits, establishing LGE as a reliable risk marker encounters challenges. Limitations arise from the fact that not all diseases show LGE, and it should always be analyzed in the context of all CMR sequences and the patient’s medical history. In summary, LGE stands as a robust indicator of adverse outcomes in diverse cardiovascular diseases. Its further integration into routine practice is desirable, necessitating widespread availability and application to accumulate both individual and scientific experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors and Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases)
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Other

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20 pages, 2965 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Relationship between Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness as a Potential Marker of Cardiovascular Risk: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis
by Oana-Maria Isailă, Victor Eduard Stoian, Iuliu Fulga, Alin-Ionut Piraianu and Sorin Hostiuc
J. Cardiovasc. Dev. Dis. 2024, 11(4), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcdd11040098 - 25 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background and Objectives: Thyroid dysfunction is known to have significant consequences on the cardiovascular system. The correlation between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been frequently evaluated in clinical studies in recent years. This study aimed to evaluate the significance [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: Thyroid dysfunction is known to have significant consequences on the cardiovascular system. The correlation between carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) and subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) has been frequently evaluated in clinical studies in recent years. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of this association through a meta-analysis. Methods: We conducted a systematic search of PubMed, MedLine, Scopus, and Web of Science databases using the keywords ‘subclinical hypothyroidism and carotid intima-media thickness’, from the beginning of each database until January 2023. We established the inclusion and exclusion criteria and considered studies that met the inclusion criteria. We used Jamovi for statistical analysis of the data. Results: We identified 39 observational studies that met the inclusion criteria, with 3430 subjects: 1545 SCH and 1885 EU. Compared to euthyroid subjects (EU), subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) had significantly increased carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) values; the estimated average mean difference was 0.08 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.10), p < 0.01, I2 = 93.82%. After the sensitivity analysis, a total of 19 from the 39 abovementioned studies were analyzed, with most studies showing a positive association between SCH and thickening of the carotid wall; the estimated average mean difference was 0.04 (95% CI 0.02 to 0.07), p = 0.03, I2 = 77.7. In addition, female sex, advanced age, and high cholesterol levels statistically significantly influenced this association. Conclusions: Our meta-analysis indicates a significant positive association between SCH and increased CIMT, but with some limitations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Risk Factors and Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases)
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