Monitoring and Management of Flies

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Pest and Vector Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2022) | Viewed by 6558

Special Issue Editors

Department of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: medical and veterinary entomology; forensic entomology; myiasis; houseflies; insect morphology; ectoparasites
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Biology, Ecology and Earth Sciences, University of Calabria, 87036 Cosenza, Italy
Interests: insect ecology; taxonomy; forensic entomology; medical entomology; coleoptera; diptera; saproxilic; saproxylic beetles; insect morphology; insect behavior; myiasis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Department of Biology, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek, 31000 Osijek, Croatia
Interests: dipteran fauna; medical and veterinary entomology; horseflies; flesh flies; louse flies; scathophagid flies
Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara, Italy
Interests: urban entomology; medical entomology; dipteran ecology; food-infesting insects; integrated pest management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

We are pleased to invite you to submit an article to the Special Issue of Insects on “Monitoring and Management of Flies”. Flies (insects belonging to the order Diptera) include species with many ecological roles: there are agricultural, medical, and veterinary pests, but also pollinating, predatory, and sarcosaprophagous species. This Special Issue aims to evaluate the state of the art of studies and methods related to the monitoring and management of Diptera. Monitoring Diptera generally involves field studies in urban, agricultural, and other areas that may provide not only data for the sustainable management of pest species but also relevant information about other species of ecological interest that require protection and conservation in view of global climate change. Studies on fly monitoring methods included in integrated pest management programs and eco-compatible methods for pest control may be part of the Special Issue, together with studies on the ecology, distribution, and invasiveness of alien species.

Original research articles, case studies, reviews, and technical reports are welcome in this Special Issue.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Marco Pezzi
Dr. Teresa Bonacci
Dr. Stjepan Krčmar
Dr. Marilena Leis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diptera
  • flies
  • monitoring
  • integrated pest management
  • sustainability
  • global climate change
  • conservation
  • insect decline

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Review

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20 pages, 747 KiB  
Review
Mosquito Surveillance and Insecticide Resistance Monitoring Conducted by the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District, Monroe County, Florida, USA
Insects 2022, 13(10), 927; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13100927 - 13 Oct 2022
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2829
Abstract
Mosquito control programs in the State of Florida are charged with protecting human and animal health, fostering economic development of the State, permitting enjoyment of the natural attractions in Florida, and improving the quality of life of citizens. Mosquito control programs must accomplish [...] Read more.
Mosquito control programs in the State of Florida are charged with protecting human and animal health, fostering economic development of the State, permitting enjoyment of the natural attractions in Florida, and improving the quality of life of citizens. Mosquito control programs must accomplish these tasks in such a manner as will protect the environment and terrestrial, marine, and freshwater ecosystems. The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District provides a science-based Integrated Pest Management mosquito control program to the residents of the Florida Keys, Monroe County, Florida. Operational decisions are based on surveillance of adult and immature mosquitoes. Mosquito populations are monitored by means of carbon dioxide-baited light traps BG Sentinel traps, truck traps, gravid traps, oviposition traps, and human landing rate counts. Larvae and pupae are monitored by inspections of natural and human-made immature habitats. Due to past and current reliance on chemical pesticides for control of mosquitoes, the District maintains a pesticide resistance detection program consisting of CDC bottle bioassays and larval bioassays, challenging local mosquito species with currently used adulticides and larvicides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Flies)
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Other

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8 pages, 749 KiB  
Case Report
Lucilia sericata (Diptera: Calliphoridae) as Agent of Myiasis in a Goose in Italy and a Review of Myiasis by This Species in Birds
Insects 2022, 13(6), 542; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects13060542 - 13 Jun 2022
Viewed by 3202
Abstract
Myiasis is a type of parasitosis by larvae of Diptera that may affect vertebrates, including wild and domestic birds. Traumatic myiasis was discovered in a domestic goose, Anser anser domesticus L. (Anseriformes: Anatidae), in June 2020 in a rural area of the region [...] Read more.
Myiasis is a type of parasitosis by larvae of Diptera that may affect vertebrates, including wild and domestic birds. Traumatic myiasis was discovered in a domestic goose, Anser anser domesticus L. (Anseriformes: Anatidae), in June 2020 in a rural area of the region Calabria (Southern Italy). The myiasis was caused by Lucilia sericata (Meigen) (Diptera: Calliphoridae). In Italy, this was the first case of myiasis by L. sericata ever described in a bird. It was also the first case of myiasis detected in a goose in Italy. The description of the case is integrated by a discussion on nonhematophagous dipteran larvae causing myiasis in birds and by an updated and detailed review of literature cases of myiasis by L. sericata in birds reported worldwide, useful for monitoring and management of dipteran species of medical and veterinary interest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Flies)
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