Aquatic Insects: Diversity, Ecology and Evolution

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450). This special issue belongs to the section "Insect Ecology, Diversity and Conservation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1692

Special Issue Editor

Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Rooseveltov trg 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: ecology and phenology of aquatic insects, taxonomy and systematics of aquatic Diptera; Empididae; biogeography; phylogeny; insects in springs

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Aquatic Insects are generally the most important component of freshwater ecosystems in terms of the number of species and their biomass. They do not form a distinct taxonomic group within the class of insects, but are linked by their ecology, as they spend all or part of their life cycle in different types of aquatic habitats. Most of them are merolimnic, i.e., their juvenile life stages are restricted to aquatic habitats, while the adults are terrestrial. There are numerous representatives of aquatic insects, starting with the Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (known as EPT taxa), which are widely used in freshwater ecology, water quality assessment and ecosystem-type categorization. However, probably the most numerous aquatic insects, in terms of number of species and their occurrence, in virtually all aquatic habitats are invariably representatives of the order Diptera. Aquatic insects are extremely important for monitoring freshwater ecosystems and many of them serve as bioindicator species. The phenology of aquatic insects is also an interesting topic as well, especially when considering the transition from aquatic to terrestrial habitats. The study of aquatic insects is crucial, not only because many of them are the most important vectors in the transmission of various diseases to humans and animals, but also because aquatic insects are the most numerous and diverse group of animals in aquatic habitats and are therefore essential for understanding the functioning of aquatic ecosystems. Knowledge of aquatic insects is still incomplete for many groups and virtually unknown for some, which may be further exacerbated by climate change and other factors.  

With this in mind, we have decided to guest-edit a Special Issue focusing on the diversity, ecology and evolution of aquatic insects. We invite biologists, taxonomists, ecologists, molecular biologists and other scientists to contribute to this Special Issue. Our goal and vision are to acknowledge that the study of aquatic insects is fundamental to today’s science. We are looking for high-quality original submissions and reviews that address and update our understanding of the biological and ecological aspects of aquatic insect fauna.

Dr. Marija Ivković
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • aquatic insects
  • biogeography
  • climate change
  • conservation
  • diversity
  • ecological traits
  • freshwater habitats
  • integrative taxonomy
  • phenology
  • species richness

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2463 KiB  
Article
Demography and Behaviour of Teinopodagrion oscillans (Odonata: Megapodagrionidae) in a Protected Area of the Colombian Andean Region
Insects 2024, 15(2), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects15020125 - 09 Feb 2024
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Abstract
The demography and behaviour of Teinopodagrion oscillans was studied in a protected area in the Andean region of Colombia. Adult damselflies were individually marked, and using their recapture histories, we estimated survival, longevity, sex ratio, and population size using Cormack-Jolly-Seber models. Other aspects [...] Read more.
The demography and behaviour of Teinopodagrion oscillans was studied in a protected area in the Andean region of Colombia. Adult damselflies were individually marked, and using their recapture histories, we estimated survival, longevity, sex ratio, and population size using Cormack-Jolly-Seber models. Other aspects of their behaviour were recorded. Survival, recapture, and lifespan (14.1 ± 0.59 days) were similar for both sexes and all age groups. Mature males were larger, and the distance from the water was similar for all individuals. The most supported model was the time-dependent model for survival and recapture. This suggests that weather variations affect the demography of this population in a significant way. Individuals exhibited high fidelity to their site perch, perching with open wings near water on a variety of perches. Mature males make short flights from the perch to intercept conspecific and interspecific males and to hunt prey. The tandem position was formed on macrophytes, and then the pair flew away. Oviposition lasted for 11.23 min on average, with the females ovipositing by abdomen submersion. Our results offer insights into the demographic characteristics and behaviour of this species, providing crucial information for the short- and long-term, from the demography of one species to the conservation of ecosystems of the Andean region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Insects: Diversity, Ecology and Evolution)
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14 pages, 2468 KiB  
Article
Long-Term Chironomid Emergence at a Karst Tufa Barrier in Plitvice Lakes National Park, Croatia
Insects 2024, 15(1), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects15010051 - 11 Jan 2024
Viewed by 664
Abstract
Chironomids are found in all types of freshwater habitats; they are a ubiquitous and highly diverse group of aquatic insects. Plitvice Lakes National Park is the oldest and largest national park in Croatia and consists of numerous and diverse freshwater habitats, making the [...] Read more.
Chironomids are found in all types of freshwater habitats; they are a ubiquitous and highly diverse group of aquatic insects. Plitvice Lakes National Park is the oldest and largest national park in Croatia and consists of numerous and diverse freshwater habitats, making the area an ideal location for long-term research into the chironomid emergence patterns and phenology. The main objectives of this study were to identify the composition of the chironomid community, determine the phenology of the identified species, and assess the main factors influencing their emergence in Plitvice Lakes. During 14 years of research, more than 13,000 chironomids belonging to more than 80 species were recorded. The most abundant species was found to be Parametriocnemus stylatus. The highest abundance of chironomids was recorded in lotic habitats with faster water current over substrates of moss and algae and pebbles. Water temperature and the availability of organic matter were found to be the main factors that drive chironomid emergence at the tufa barrier studied. In the last years of this study, a prolonged flight period was observed. Although this is not statistically significant (at this stage of the study), it could be due to a higher water temperature in winter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Insects: Diversity, Ecology and Evolution)
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