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Obstetrics–Gynecology and Women’s Healthcare in COVID-19 Times

Editors

Department of Pregnancy Pathology, Medical University of Silesia, 40-211 Katowice, Poland
Interests: pediatric and adolescent gynecology; menstrual disorders; endometriosis; chronic pelvic pain; endocrine disorders and sexual abuse of minors as well as clinical sexology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Collection Editor
Department of Pregnancy Pathology, Medical University of Silesia, 40-211 Katowice, Poland
Interests: perinatal medicine with an emphasis on perinatal infections and methods of labour pain relief; adolescent gynecology; endocrine disorders; endometriosis; aesthetic gynecology; clinical sexology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID‐19) is a global public health emergency. There are many concerns relating to the impact of SARS-CoV-2 infection on pregnant women and their fetuses, as well as the challenge of gynecological patient management in the context of COVID-19.

Moreover, preventive health in the OB/GYN patient population is key, and practitioners should become comfortable with providing education about topics as diverse as sexuality, eating disorders, and dating violence, especially in post-pandemic times.

This Topical Collection seeks the latest research, guidance and opinions on COVID-19 in obstetric and gynecological settings, including management of infected pregnant women, rationalization of ultrasound services and risk mitigation for both patients and practitioners during the current pandemic. We also welcome high-quality systematic reviews related to these matters.  

We must not forget about scientific publications not directly related to the pandemic, but created in these difficult times for both doctors and patients. Therefore, we are also considering manuscripts that are unrelated to the COVID-19 pandemic.

We would be more than happy if this Topical Collection serves as a trigger for considering more effective methods in women’s healthcare in the future.

Prof. Dr. Agnieszka Drosdzol-Cop
Dr. Anna Fuchs
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • women's health
  • obstetrics
  • adolescent gynecology
  • pediatric gynecology
  • COVID-19
  • contraception
  • lichen sclerosus
  • USG screening
  • sexual health
  • menstrual disorders

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (4 papers)

2022

13 pages, 1053 KiB  
Article
Depressive Symptoms and Control of Emotions among Polish Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(24), 16871; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192416871 - 15 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1480
Abstract
Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder that substantially affects women’s health. It is particularly diagnosed in young patients. Women with PCOS are burdened with excessive weight gain, overweight and obesity (74%) compared to a healthy female population. Excessive weight influences psychological [...] Read more.
Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a disorder that substantially affects women’s health. It is particularly diagnosed in young patients. Women with PCOS are burdened with excessive weight gain, overweight and obesity (74%) compared to a healthy female population. Excessive weight influences psychological state and emotional well-being, whereas in the meantime, psychological and behavioral dysfunction is increasingly being diagnosed among patients with PCOS. Aim: To assess depressive symptoms and emotional control among women with PCOS in relation to BMI. Methods: The study was conducted among 671 self-reported PCOS women. The standardized Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) was used to assess depressive disorders. Emotion control was assessed using the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS). Results: Moderate and severe depressive symptoms were more common in PCOS women with abnormal BMI compared to normal BMI subjects (p < 0.01). In total, 27.1% of obese women had moderate depression and 28.8% had severe depression. Among overweight women, 19.9% suffered from moderate and 25% from severe depressive symptoms. Underweight women also reported moderate (25.6%) and severe (33.3%) depressive signs. There were no statistically significant differences between the body weight of the women studied and the CECS scores. Conclusions: Depressive symptoms are more common in women with PCOS and abnormal BMI than in women with PCOS and proper BMI. The severity of depressive symptoms increases with BMI, but underweight women with PCOS are also at risk of depressive disorders. The level of suppression of negative emotions is independent of BMI in women with PCOS. Full article
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9 pages, 1411 KiB  
Article
Safety of Three-Dimensional versus Two-Dimensional Laparoscopic Hysterectomy during the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14163; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114163 - 29 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1214
Abstract
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant decrease in the number of surgical procedures performed. Therefore, it is important to use surgical methods that carry the lowest possible risk of virus transmission between the patient and the operating theater staff. Aim: [...] Read more.
Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a significant decrease in the number of surgical procedures performed. Therefore, it is important to use surgical methods that carry the lowest possible risk of virus transmission between the patient and the operating theater staff. Aim: Safety evaluation of three-dimensional (3D) versus two-dimensional (2D) laparoscopic hysterectomy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: 44 patients were assigned to a prospective case-control study. They were divided either to 3D (n = 22) or 2D laparoscopic hysterectomy (n = 22). Fourteen laparoscopic supracervical hysterectomies (LASH) and eight total laparoscopic hysterectomies (TLH) were performed in every group. The demographic data, operating time, change in patients’ hemoglobin level and other surgical outcomes were evaluated. Results: 3D laparoscopy was associated with a significantly shorter operating time than 2D. (3D vs. 2D LASH 70 ± 23 min vs. 90 ± 20 min, p = 0.0086; 3D vs. 2D TLH 72 ± 9 min vs. 85 ± 9 min, p = 0.0089). The 3D and 2D groups were not significantly different in terms of change in serum hemoglobin level and other surgical outcomes. Conclusions: Due to a shorter operating time, 3D laparoscopic hysterectomy seems to be a safer method both for both the surgeon and the patient. Regarding terms of possible virus transmission, it may be particularly considered the first-choice method during the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
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12 pages, 1923 KiB  
Article
Female Sexual Function in Twin Pregnancy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3546; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063546 - 16 Mar 2022
Viewed by 4164
Abstract
Introduction: The incidence of twin pregnancy is estimated at 1 per 80 single pregnancies. As the topic of sexual function among women with multiple pregnancy is insufficiently developed, we believe it is appropriate to raise this subject. Methods: A prospective study was conducted [...] Read more.
Introduction: The incidence of twin pregnancy is estimated at 1 per 80 single pregnancies. As the topic of sexual function among women with multiple pregnancy is insufficiently developed, we believe it is appropriate to raise this subject. Methods: A prospective study was conducted on 100 women during subsequent trimesters of pregnancy. Results: From a group of 100 women, 54 women were primiparous, while 46 women had a history of previous delivery. The mean overall FSFI (female sexual function index) was found to be 24.3 ± 6.1. Mean FSFI was the highest in the first trimester at 25.6. The result decreased successively to 24.8 ± 7 and 22.6 ± 8.4 in the second and third trimesters, respectively. The patient’s place of residence had a crucial impact on their FSFI score. The results were considerably higher for residents of small and medium towns or cities—24.4 ± 3.8 and 25.9 ± 4.9, respectively—while for those living in rural areas, the FSFI reached only 21.7 ± 5.4. Conclusions: The present study shows that the FSFI decreased throughout twin pregnancy. The lowest observed FSFI occurred in the third trimester, while the highest FSFI occurred during the first trimester. Full article
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9 pages, 517 KiB  
Article
The Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on Female Sexual Function
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3349; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063349 - 12 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2054
Abstract
Introduction: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic affected many aspects of life involving sexual functioning. Methods: This prospective, noninterventional, observational research was performed from July 2020 to August 2020, involving a total of 644 patients. Female sexual function index (FSFI) scores of those [...] Read more.
Introduction: The outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic affected many aspects of life involving sexual functioning. Methods: This prospective, noninterventional, observational research was performed from July 2020 to August 2020, involving a total of 644 patients. Female sexual function index (FSFI) scores of those women were compared in relation to results of our research from April 2020. Questionnaires were collected concerning socio-demographic characteristics of patients as well as the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their lives. Results: Every domain significantly decreased in the first month of the lockdown. Before the pandemic, the total FSFI was reported at 30.1 ± 4.4, while in the first month of the pandemic it was at 25.8 ± 9.7 (p < 0.001). The lowest FSFI score was reported by women who lived in average conditions. There was a statistically significant increase in the overall FSFI score in the fifth month of the pandemic (27.5 ± 6.8) when compared to the FSFI score in the first month of the pandemic (25.8 ± 9.7). The scores in arousal, lubrication, orgasm and pain were reported as higher (respectively p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.05), while desire was reported lower (p < 0.001). The satisfaction score remained almost the same (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Our study indicates a significant decrease in FSFI scores across all domains. There are still many questions whether the statue from the vaccinated person or convalescents affects the sense of security and, thus, increases sexual satisfaction. Full article
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