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Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Care Sciences & Services".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2024) | Viewed by 12365

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Barassi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Center for Physiotherapy, Rehabilitation and Re-Education (Ce.Fi.R.R.), Gemelli Molise, 86100 Campobasso, Italy
2. Center for Professionalising Didactics, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, 86100 Campobasso, Italy
3. Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, 86100 Campobasso, Italy
4. Department of Innovative Technologies in Medicine and Dentistry, “G. d’Annunzio” University of Chieti-Pescara, Via dei Vestini 31, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: sports medicine; rehabilitation medicine; physiotherapy
Department of Innovative Technologies in Medicine & Dentistry, University “G. d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara, 66100 Chieti, Italy
Interests: aging; disability; epidemiology; sarcopenia; osteoporosis; frailty; shoulder pain; rehabilitation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthcare managers, scientific boards, and caregiver associations are developing an ever-greater awareness of disability and disability-related “need”. The world of orthosis and prosthesis is constantly evolving as a result of technological innovation and the different solutions offered by scientific research. Today it is possible to pursue the improvement of quality of life and autonomy in a way that would have been unthinkable just a few years ago. There is a wider ongoing discussion about the independent living of the person with disabilities: help is a right of the citizen but also an opportunity for their life, which is a precious asset. For these reasons it is necessary to prescribe orthosis and prosthesis competently, and attribute them appropriately. The main objective of this Special Issue is to present new solutions and new technical productions of orthosis and prosthesis, and to discuss new integrated approaches to disabilities in Europe and worldwide.

Prof. Dr. Giovanni Barassi
Guest Editor

Dr. Angelo Di Iorio
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • orthosis and prosthesis
  • rehabilitation technology
  • gait analysis
  • assistive technologies
  • patient safety

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 787 KiB  
Article
The Rasch Analysis Shows Poor Construct Validity and Low Reliability of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology 2.0 (QUEST 2.0) Questionnaire
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1036; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021036 - 06 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1549
Abstract
This study aims to test the construct validity and reliability of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology 2.0 (QUEST)–device, an eight-item questionnaire for measuring satisfaction with assistive devices. We collected 250 questionnaires from 79 patients and 32 caregivers. One QUEST [...] Read more.
This study aims to test the construct validity and reliability of the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with assistive Technology 2.0 (QUEST)–device, an eight-item questionnaire for measuring satisfaction with assistive devices. We collected 250 questionnaires from 79 patients and 32 caregivers. One QUEST was completed for each assistive device. Five assistive device types were included. QUEST was tested with the Rasch analysis (Many-Facet Rating Scale Model: persons, items, and device type). Most patients were affected by neurological disabilities, and most questionnaires were about mobility devices. All items fitted the Rasch model (InfitMS range: 0.88–1.1; OutfitMS: 0.84–1.28). However, the ceiling effect of the questionnaire was large (15/111 participants totalled the maximum score), its targeting poor (respondents mean measure: 1.90 logits), and its reliability was 0.71. The device classes had different calibrations (range: −1.18 to 1.26 logits), and item 3 functioned differently in patients and caregivers. QUEST satisfaction measures have low reliability and weak construct validity. Lacking invariance, the QUEST total score is unsuitable for comparing the satisfaction levels of users of different device types. The differential item functioning suggests that the QUEST could also be problematic for comparing satisfaction in patients and caregivers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
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8 pages, 300 KiB  
Article
Bio-Physics Approach to Urinary Incontinence Disabilities
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12612; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912612 - 02 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1234
Abstract
Background: The terminology of urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic floor dysfunctions is complex. It affects quality of life and daily activities in personal, social, and professional fields. Managing UI without pharmacologic therapies is effective with a low risk of adverse effects and a [...] Read more.
Background: The terminology of urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic floor dysfunctions is complex. It affects quality of life and daily activities in personal, social, and professional fields. Managing UI without pharmacologic therapies is effective with a low risk of adverse effects and a large benefit for increasing continence rates. The aim of this preliminary retrospective observational study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the association between manual therapy and focused mechano-acoustic vibrations in women with nonspecific UI. Materials and methods: A group of 15 incontinent women (mean age 59.5 ± 11.4), referred to the Physiotherapy Center, Rehabilitation and Re-education (Ce.Fi.R.R.), located at the University “Gabriele d’Annunzio” of Chieti-Pescara from January 2019 December 2021, were enrolled after medical examination. The women were evaluated at T0 (admission protocol), T1 (after 8 weeks), and T2 (after 12 weeks). All patients received the rehabilitation protocol twice a week for a total of 8 weeks (T1) and were reevaluated after 12 weeks (T2). Outcome measures were: the Pelvic Floor Disability Index, the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7, and the MyotonPRO. Results: The analysis of MyotonPRO data showed no significant improvements in all parameters. The PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 questionnaire results showed a significant reduction in scores between T0 and T2.Results over time of the ANOVA values confirming the significant differences in the PFDI-20 and PFIQ-7 questionnaire results but not in the MyotonPRO variables. Conclusions: Despite limitations and no significant results, this study demonstrated that the integration of manual and focused mechano-acoustic vibrations therapy improved the symptoms of UI and reduced its psychosocial impact. Further experience could be required to establish the place of this integrated approach in achieving long-term improvements in UI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
11 pages, 1977 KiB  
Article
High-Level Mobility of Trans-Tibial Prosthesis Users Wearing Commercial and sPace Energy-Storing Prosthetic Feet
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12606; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912606 - 02 Oct 2022
Viewed by 1923
Abstract
Outcomes of users provided with a commercial ESR Vari-Flex foot (Össur, Reykjavik, Iceland) and a locally designed sPace foot were investigated. Step activity with users’ own prosthetic foot compared to the sPace foot was explored. Methods: Eleven individuals with unilateral trans-tibial amputation participated [...] Read more.
Outcomes of users provided with a commercial ESR Vari-Flex foot (Össur, Reykjavik, Iceland) and a locally designed sPace foot were investigated. Step activity with users’ own prosthetic foot compared to the sPace foot was explored. Methods: Eleven individuals with unilateral trans-tibial amputation participated and were provided with an sPace and Vari-Flex foot. Ten- and twenty-meter walk tests (10/20MWT) at comfortable and fast walking speeds (CWS/FWS), the two-minute walk test (2-MWT) and Comprehensive High-Level Activity Mobility Predictor (CHAMP) were administered. A subgroup was provided a pedometer to record their steps over a 7-day period in their own foot and later the sPace. Results: The sPace foot performed well in a battery of high-level mobility outcome measures. On CHAMP, participants scored 16.94 ± 5.41 and 16.72 ± 6.09 with the sPace and Vari-Flex feet, respectively. Subgroup testing of step activity showed 4490 ± 3444 steps in users’ own feet and 3115 ± 1967 in the sPace foot, p = 0.176. Conclusions: Participants using the sPace foot were capable of performing walking, high-level mobility and activity outcome measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
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14 pages, 956 KiB  
Article
Bridging the Gap between Clinical Service and Academic Education of Hand-Splinting Practice: Perspectives and Experiences of Thai Occupational Therapists
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 8995; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19158995 - 24 Jul 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2140
Abstract
A gap in knowledge about current splinting practice exists between the educational program and clinical service. To bridge this gap, we investigated the perspectives and experiences of Thai occupational therapists regarding contemporary hand splinting practices in clinical use. A mixed-method study was designed. [...] Read more.
A gap in knowledge about current splinting practice exists between the educational program and clinical service. To bridge this gap, we investigated the perspectives and experiences of Thai occupational therapists regarding contemporary hand splinting practices in clinical use. A mixed-method study was designed. An explanatory sequential mixed methods design was used. In the first quantitative phase, a survey questionnaire was mailed to occupational therapists. The questions were regarding contemporary hand splinting practices in clinical use at seven hospitals in the capital city of Bangkok and outskirt areas. In the second phase, semi-structured interviews were completed to explore expert occupational therapists’ perspectives on practice in the same hospital settings. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. The results showed that most conditions receiving splints were nerve injuries, orthopedics, and stroke, which represented the service frequency of splint types: functional resting (100%), cock-up (93.3%), and thumb spica splints (80%). Bone and joint deformity prevention ranked first with muscle contracture prevention being ranked second, and the third-ranked was maintaining range of motion. Three themes emerged from the interviews: starting with the patient condition; effective function and value; knowledge and experiential skills. Perspectives and experiences of occupational therapists in splinting practice contribute to education based on the reality of practice. Integrated numerical and textual data of professional skills and knowledge in actual splinting practice can be reflected through splints and orthoses program revisions to meet future learning outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
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9 pages, 574 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Ultrasound-Guided Percutaneous Lavage and Biocompatible Electrical Neurostimulation, in Calcific Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy and Shoulder Pain, A Prospective Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 5837; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19105837 - 11 May 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1601
Abstract
Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder (CTS) is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Conservative treatment is considered as the first therapeutic choice for CTS. The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of US-guided needling (UGN) compared to UGN [...] Read more.
Calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder (CTS) is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Conservative treatment is considered as the first therapeutic choice for CTS. The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of US-guided needling (UGN) compared to UGN plus Biocompatible Electrical Neurostimulation (BEN) in the treatment of the CTS. Pilot, prospective, non-interventional, monocentric, and observational study of patients treated for calcific rotator cuff tendinopathy and shoulder pain. Patients’ selection, enrollment and interventions were conducted at the Chiparo Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation outpatient facility. Forty adult patients (aged 40–60 years) with a diagnosis of CTS in the acute and colliquative phase were recruited and enrolled into the study. Participants were assessed for self-perceived pain through the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS), and for functional limitation through the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index score (SPADI) at baseline (T0), after 15 days (T1), and after 40 days (T2). As a possible confounding factor between the two treatments’ response, the dimension of the tendon calcification was also assessed by US-examination. Through the study, both groups improved their perceived functional performance of the arm (p-value < 0.001). AT T1, the SPADI score decreased by half in both groups, and the improvement remained stable at T2. A multiplicative effect (Time × Treatment) was demonstrated (p-value < 0.001). An improvement in the NRS score was measured at T1, and it remained stable at T2, a multiplicative effect was also reported (p-value < 0.001). The main results of this pilot study provide evidence that UGN plus BEN increases functional performance and reduces shoulder pain in individuals with CTS. Moreover, the tendon calcification dimension at the baseline and the percentage of drainage of the lesion were associated with a functional performance recovery and pain reduction detected after intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
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Review

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23 pages, 2020 KiB  
Review
Manipulation under Anesthesia versus Non-Surgical Treatment for Patients with Frozen Shoulder Contracture Syndrome: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9715; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159715 - 07 Aug 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3159
Abstract
Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) compared to other non-surgical therapeutic strategies for patients with frozen shoulder contracture syndrome (FSCS). Methods: A systematic review of literature was conducted. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, Cochrane Central [...] Read more.
Purpose: To investigate the efficacy of manipulation under anesthesia (MUA) compared to other non-surgical therapeutic strategies for patients with frozen shoulder contracture syndrome (FSCS). Methods: A systematic review of literature was conducted. A literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, Cochrane Central Library and Scopus. Only randomized controlled trials were included and assessed for critical appraisal through the Cochrane Collaborations tools. Results: Five randomized controlled trials were included. The overall risk of bias (RoB) was high in 4 out of 5 of the included studies. MUA was found to be not superior in terms of reduction of pain and improvement of function when compared to cortisone injections with hydrodilatation (mean regression coefficient MUA −2.77 vs. injection −2.75; 95% CI (−1.11 to 1.15)) and home exercise (mean difference 95% CI: 0.2 (−0.64 to 1.02)) in the short term (3 months), and cortisone injections with hydrodilatation (mean regression coefficient MUA 3.13 vs. injection 3.23; 95% CI (−0.90 to 1.11)) in the long term (>6 months). Moreover, if compared to structured physiotherapy, MUA highlighted a higher Oxford Shoulder Score at final 1-year follow up (mean difference 95% CI: 1.05 (−1.28 to 3.39); p = 0.38). Similar results were obtained for disability, with statistically no significant long-term (>12 months) differences between MUA and home exercise (mean difference 95% CI: 0 (−3.2 to 3.2)) or structured physiotherapy (mean difference 95% CI: −0.50 (−5.70 to 4.70); p = 0.85)). Only two trials reported adverse events. Conclusions: This review suggested that limited and inconsistent evidence currently exists on the efficacy of MUA compared to other non-surgical strategies in the management of patients with FSCS. Future research should focus on clinical trials with higher methodological quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Orthosis and Prothesis from Bench to Real Life)
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