ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 50379

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
Interests: occupational risk assessment; management of occupational risks; accident analysis; accident prevention; safety engineering; collective protections; innovation; workplace interventions; construction engineering; fall prevention and protection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Associated Laboratory for Energy, Transports and Aeronautics, (PROA-LAETA), Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto, 4200-465 Porto, Portugal
Interests: safety engineering; risk assessment; risk management; industrial ergonomics; industrial hygiene; occupational health; accident costs; human engineering; mining project
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Escuela Técnica Superior de Edificación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain
Interests: building materials; resources and facilities; accident prevention; safety engineering; corrosion prevention for steel building security intallations; innovation and research of scaffolding structures; construction management

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Because of the high rate of accidents at work, there is a profound interest in improving safety and diminishing the accident rate. Current trends aim to quantify occupational risk in order to strengthen the basis of at-work risk management. The target is identify what causes occupational accidents, taking into account work conditions. To do so, the following aspects are studied: work environment, the worker’s individual behavior, risk perception, safety management systems within business organization, accident statistics, and exposure to hazards. These studies lead to quantified risk assessments, which are used to plan a preventive course of action, using both priorization criteria and the following implementation of preventive and protective measures. This global environment requires several science fields to participate, such as engineering, health sciences, psychosociology, and social sciences.

This Special Issue encourages the submission of transversal works on the research and implementation of the current advances in occupational health and safety, taking into account the different approaches to combatting at-work risks, e.g., health safety, industrial hygiene, ergonomics, psychosociology, social policies, and training. Combining different techniques allows for developing a more complex and multidisciplinary vision of the tools and techniques that are available for combatting at-work risks. Research results improve decision making in the professional practice of occupational health and safety. Insight from different disciplines is sought from within the fields of academic, professional, technical, and scientific research on occupational health and safety and its practical implementation.

The following lines of work are sought in this Issue:

  • Individual behavior analysis and study.
  • Accident causal sequence and influence of organizational, external, or individual factors.
  • Implementation of accident prevention policies.
  • Use and design of collective protections.
  • Personal protective equipment use and technical advances.
  • Biomechanics and health.
  • Work tools and equipment design and manufacturing.
  • Organization factors.
  • Management practices.
  • Technological systems and their effect on health safety.
  • Methods: accident rate statistical analysis, human behavior statistical analysis, and organization practices and diagrams analysis.
  • Safety and health management in industry.
  • Integration of safety, health, and environment in business management.
  • Methodologies and assessment methods of quantitative and qualitative risks, and their implementation.

Dr. María de las Nieves González García
Dr. João dos Santos Baptista
Dr. Inmaculada Martínez Pérez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • occupational risk assessment
  • experimental estudios
  • workplace monitoring
  • accident prevention
  • collective protections
  • personal protective equipment
  • biomechanics and health
  • organization factors
  • accident statistical analysis
  • integration of safety in business management

Published Papers (15 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 572 KiB  
Article
The Portuguese Third Version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire: Preliminary Validation Studies of the Middle Version among Municipal and Healthcare Workers
by Teresa P. Cotrim, Pedro Bem-Haja, Anabela Pereira, Cláudia Fernandes, Rui Azevedo, Samuel Antunes, Joaquim S. Pinto, Flávio Kanazawa, Isabel Souto, Elisabeth Brito and Carlos F. Silva
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031167 - 21 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4678
Abstract
A third version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ III) was developed internationally aiming to respond to new trends in working conditions, theoretical concepts, and international experience. This article aims to present the preliminary validation studies for the Portuguese middle version of COPSOQ [...] Read more.
A third version of the Copenhagen Psychosocial Questionnaire (COPSOQ III) was developed internationally aiming to respond to new trends in working conditions, theoretical concepts, and international experience. This article aims to present the preliminary validation studies for the Portuguese middle version of COPSOQ III. This is an exploratory cross-sectional study viewing the cross-cultural adaption of COPSOQ III to Portugal, ensuring the contents and face validity and performing field-testing in order to reduce the number of items and to obtain insight into the data structure, through classic test theory and item response theory approaches. The qualitative study encompassed 29 participants and the quantitative one 659 participants from municipalities and healthcare settings. Content analysis suggested that minor re-wording could improve the face validity of items, while a reduced version, with 85 items, shows psychometric stability, achieving good internal consistency in all subscales. The COPSOQ III Portuguese middle version proved to be a valid preliminary version for future validation studies with various populations, able to be used in correlational studies with other dimensions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
10 pages, 897 KiB  
Article
Incidence of Voice Disorders among Private School Teachers in Taiwan: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study
by Bo-Lei Chen, Ya-Yun Cheng, Cheng-Yu Lin and How-Ran Guo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(3), 1130; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19031130 - 20 Jan 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1992
Abstract
Background: Teachers are more likely to use a loud voice at work than the general working population, but few longitudinal studies have been conducted on their risk of voice disorders. The occurrence of voice disorders in private school teachers was assessed by using [...] Read more.
Background: Teachers are more likely to use a loud voice at work than the general working population, but few longitudinal studies have been conducted on their risk of voice disorders. The occurrence of voice disorders in private school teachers was assessed by using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 of Taiwan, which contains information on a random sample of 1 million beneficiaries of National Health Insurance. Methods: This study included private school teachers who were under 35 years old and newly employed between 2000 and 2010, and used workers with other occupations as the comparison cohort. Patients with voice disorders were identified using diagnostic codes on insurance claims. Cox proportional hazards regressions were applied to obtain relative risk estimates. Results: After adjusting for age, sex, income, and comorbidities of sinusitis and laryngitis, private school teachers had a higher risk of developing voice disorders (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.58; 95% confidence intervals: 1.43–1.75). In addition, the finding that elementary and high-school teachers had a higher risk than college teachers (HR: 2.56 vs. 1.44) and the pattern of increases in cumulative incidence over time supported a dose–response relationship between teaching and voice disorders. Conclusions: Private school teachers had higher risks of voice disorders. The results support the causality between occupation and voice disorders in teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 350 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Risk Factors of Occupational Health Hazards among Health Care Workers of Northern Saudi Arabia: A Multicenter Study
by Ashokkumar Thirunavukkarasu, Khaloud Amash Hossin Alrawaili, Ahmad Homoud Al-Hazmi, Umar Farooq Dar, Bashayer ALruwaili, Ayesha Mallick, Farooq Ahmed Wani and Amnah Ibrahim E Alsirhani
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11489; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111489 - 31 Oct 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 4508
Abstract
Health care workers (HCWs) working in different health care facilities are exposed to many hazards, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This questionnaire-based cross-sectional study aimed to assess the prevalence, pattern, and risk factors of occupational health hazards faced by 438 randomly selected HCWs [...] Read more.
Health care workers (HCWs) working in different health care facilities are exposed to many hazards, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. This questionnaire-based cross-sectional study aimed to assess the prevalence, pattern, and risk factors of occupational health hazards faced by 438 randomly selected HCWs from northern Saudi Arabia. The HCWs are commonly exposed to needle stick injuries (34.5%) under the biological hazards category; and work-related stress (69.6%) under the non-biological hazards categories. The significant associated factors were work setting (ref: Primary Health Center: Adjusted OR (AOR) = 2.81, 95%CI = 1.21–4.59, p = 0.017), smoking status (ref.: non-smoker: AOR = 1.73, 95%CI = 1.03–2.91, p = 0.039), and mean sleeping duration per day (AOR = 1.22, 95%CI = 1.04–1.43, p = 0.014) for biological, and smoking status (ref: non-smoker: AOR = 2.16, 95%CI = 1.09–3.29, p = 0.028), and mean sleeping duration per day (AOR = 1.35, 95%CI = 1.07–1.70, p = 0.013) for non-biological categories. This study revealed several risk factors and occupational health hazards that HCWs are exposed to during their work time. Periodic training and follow-up assessments regarding bio-safety measures for the HCWs should be implemented. Finally, future explorative studies are warranted on the feasibility of implementing rotation-based postings for the HCWs in different health care settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
21 pages, 838 KiB  
Article
Modeling Energy Expenditure Estimation in Occupational Context by Actigraphy: A Multi Regression Mixed-Effects Model
by André Lucena, Joana Guedes, Mário Vaz, Luiz Silva, Denisse Bustos and Erivaldo Souza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(19), 10419; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph181910419 - 3 Oct 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2016
Abstract
The accurate prediction of energy requirements for healthy individuals has many useful applications. The occupational perspective has also been proven to be of great utility for improving workers’ ergonomics, safety, and health. This work proposes a statistical regression model based on actigraphy and [...] Read more.
The accurate prediction of energy requirements for healthy individuals has many useful applications. The occupational perspective has also been proven to be of great utility for improving workers’ ergonomics, safety, and health. This work proposes a statistical regression model based on actigraphy and personal characteristics to estimate energy expenditure and cross-validate the results with reference standardized methods. The model was developed by hierarchical mixed-effects regression modeling based on the multitask protocol data. Measurements combined actigraphy, indirect calorimetry, and other personal and lifestyle information from healthy individuals (n = 50) within the age of 29.8 ± 5 years old. Results showed a significant influence of the variables related to movements, heart rate and anthropometric variables of body composition for energy expenditure estimation. Overall, the proposed model showed good agreement with energy expenditure measured by indirect calorimetry and evidenced a better performance than the methods presented in the international guidelines for metabolic rate assessment proving to be a reliable alternative to normative guidelines. Furthermore, a statistically significant relationship was found between daily activity and energy expenditure, which raised the possibility of further studies including other variables, namely those related to the subject’s lifestyle. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 5277 KiB  
Article
Minimum Clearance Distance in Fall Arrest Systems with Energy Absorber Lanyards
by Elena Ángela Carrión, Belén Ferrer, Juan Francisco Monge, Pedro Ignacio Saez, Juan Carlos Pomares and Antonio González
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5823; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115823 - 28 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3025
Abstract
Accidents due to falls from height are one of the main causes of death in workplaces. Fall arrest systems (FAS) are designed to arrest the fall safely without injuring the accident victim. Their main mission is to restrain the body so as to [...] Read more.
Accidents due to falls from height are one of the main causes of death in workplaces. Fall arrest systems (FAS) are designed to arrest the fall safely without injuring the accident victim. Their main mission is to restrain the body so as to prevent it from hitting the ground, generating forces and accelerations in the arrest process that are not harmful. A lack of empirical evidence and scant technical information provided by manufacturers regarding minimum clearance distance (MCD) below anchorage makes it necessary to study the safety distances required in the use of Energy Absorber Lanyards (EAL). This paper aims to determine the MCD below anchorage to arrest a fall using an EAL without hitting the ground. The real deformation of EAL when stopping a fall is studied. Ten EAL models distributed internationally by six manufacturers were chosen. Dynamic behavior tests were performed on the samples. Using image processing the total elongation of the equipment (elastic plus plastic) is obtained. The main conclusions are that maximum plastic elongation could be reduced by 29%. The method described in EN 355: 2002 underestimates elongation by up to 70% for some equipment 20% of EAL’s exceed the maximum arrest force (Fm) allowed in EN 355. The MCD data provided by manufacturers is not reliable. The data provided by manufacturers are incomplete. It is recommended that quality control for EAL’s be strengthened to ensure that products launched onto the market meet the requirement of EN355. The findings of this study recommended increasing MCD distance longer than that calculated according to EN355, at less than 1 m. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

13 pages, 635 KiB  
Article
Depressive Symptoms among Chinese Informal Employees in the Digital Era
by Yang Cai, Weiwei Kong, Yongsheng Lian and Xiangxin Jin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5211; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105211 - 14 May 2021
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 2697
Abstract
The mental health status of informal employees is rarely studied in China. Nowadays, new economic forms such as gig economy and platform economy are emerging with the rapid development of information and communication technology, which has brought great changes to the labor market, [...] Read more.
The mental health status of informal employees is rarely studied in China. Nowadays, new economic forms such as gig economy and platform economy are emerging with the rapid development of information and communication technology, which has brought great changes to the labor market, especially to the informal employment field. Thus, it is of great significance to investigate the depressive symptoms among informal employees in the digital era. Based on the cross-sectional data of CFPS (China Family Panel Studies, 2018), this study takes a quantitative analysis framework to explore and analyze the association between informal employment and depressive symptoms in the Chinese labor market. After screening, a data set of 8893 employees (60.5% male and 39.5% female) was established. Several statistical methods, including the Mann–Whitney test and probit regression model, were used in the sample data analysis. The results show that the prevalence of depressive symptoms among informal employees is significantly higher than that among formal employees. Depressive symptoms are highly related to informal work and other factors, such as education, physical health, household income, etc. The impact of Internet use on informal employees’ depressive symptoms is not significant. The mental health inequality between formal and informal employees still exists in the digital era, and corresponding labor market regulations and social policies should be perfected to address this issue. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

27 pages, 48537 KiB  
Article
Vertical Archaeology: Safety in the Use of Ropes for Scientific Research of Pre-Columbian Andean Cultures
by Pedro Ignacio Saez, Elena Ángela Carrión, Encarnación García and Manuel Ollanta Aparicio-Flores
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073536 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3377
Abstract
Scientific research is sometimes subjected to go through field study in places that are difficult to access. Where man has not managed to reach through traditional techniques, work at height systems offer new possibilities, provide safety in exploration and represent an excellent tool [...] Read more.
Scientific research is sometimes subjected to go through field study in places that are difficult to access. Where man has not managed to reach through traditional techniques, work at height systems offer new possibilities, provide safety in exploration and represent an excellent tool that allows a new insight of spaces object of scientific research. For more than 20 years, the Ukhupacha team has been studying, analyzing and selecting the teams, techniques and rope progression systems that best adapt to archaeological works in vertical environments. The projects studied are developed in Pre-Columbian cultures of the Andean mountain range, the high Amazon jungle and its surroundings. As a result, a new working methodology called Vertical Archaeology has been developed. It prioritizes user’s safety by means of ropes when accessing archaeological research areas. The recommended and safest systems, techniques and personal protective equipment (PPE) are presented for each of the phases in which it is proposed to divide archaeological investigations: exploration, training and expedition. Using rope access techniques has allowed the safe study of new artistic and heritage aspects in ancient civilizations, as well as the approach of the scientific community to places that until now had remained hidden. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

23 pages, 4324 KiB  
Article
Zero-Risk Interpretation in the Level of Preventive Action Method Implementation for Health and Safety in Construction Sites
by Antonio José Carpio-de los Pinos, María de las Nieves González-García, Ligia Cristina Pentelhão and J. Santos Baptista
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3534; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073534 - 29 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2857
Abstract
Risk assessment is a legal obligation for all companies in most countries worldwide. It aims to control the quality of working conditions and avoid externalizing the consequences of accidents and resulting costs to society. This work discusses the need for an adequate interpretation [...] Read more.
Risk assessment is a legal obligation for all companies in most countries worldwide. It aims to control the quality of working conditions and avoid externalizing the consequences of accidents and resulting costs to society. This work discusses the need for an adequate interpretation of the zero-risk concept from a technical-preventive perspective to assess occupational risks in construction sites. A critical analysis of several risk assessment methodologies was carried out, focusing on the evaluation criteria of little or no-risk situations. The verification of the results was made through a case study. The perception of health and safety risks by workers is very different from that of the evaluators. Often, when workers identify a situation as low-risk or even zero-risk, the evaluator assesses the same context as maximum risk. Given the workers’ and the evaluators’ responses, the Preventive Action Method establishes a new parameter, the Environment Congruence. This parameter is based on the perception of the preventive environment and gives more importance to the evaluators’ decision. When preventive action is optimal, the risk is low in all preventive observation settings. In conclusion, this study justifies the non-nullity of the risk and the difficulty of assessing zero-risk in construction sites. Therefore, evaluations with qualitative and quantitative non-risk approaches should be discarded. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 571 KiB  
Article
Bridging the Gap between Theory, Practice, and Policy: A Decision-Making Process Based on Public Health Evidence Feasible in Multi-Stage Research on Biological Risk Factors in Poland
by Anita Gębska-Kuczerowska, Sudakshina Lahiri and Robert Gajda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7657; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207657 - 20 Oct 2020
Viewed by 2193
Abstract
Stakeholder input into the decision-making process when developing public health programs and policies is crucial. This article presents an innovative approach, involving online participation with a wide group of stakeholders located in different geographic locations for policy consensus. The results of the project [...] Read more.
Stakeholder input into the decision-making process when developing public health programs and policies is crucial. This article presents an innovative approach, involving online participation with a wide group of stakeholders located in different geographic locations for policy consensus. The results of the project have been used to propose assumptions regarding a strategy for preventing blood-borne diseases in Poland. The research was conducted iteratively using a multi-stage qualitative methodology to explore risk assessment involving blood-borne infections. The final output of the study is a list of key problems/challenges and potential solutions associated with medical and nonmedical services that are connected to the breakage of tissue continuity. Qualitative research is rare in risk assessment, as priority is generally given to statistical data and endpoints. In addition to policy preparation for blood-borne illnesses, the methodology employed in the study can also be used to successfully explore other areas of public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

22 pages, 4027 KiB  
Article
Average Force of Deployment and Maximum Arrest Force of Energy Absorbers Lanyards
by Elena Ángela Carrión, Pedro Ignacio Saez, Juan Carlos Pomares and Antonio Gonzalez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(20), 7647; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17207647 - 20 Oct 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2306
Abstract
Energy-absorbing lanyards (EAL) are part of fall arrest systems (FAS), their main mission is to dissipate the energy generated during the fall, ensuring that the arresting force does not cause injury to the user. For the design of FAS as set out in [...] Read more.
Energy-absorbing lanyards (EAL) are part of fall arrest systems (FAS), their main mission is to dissipate the energy generated during the fall, ensuring that the arresting force does not cause injury to the user. For the design of FAS as set out in the American standard Z359.6 and the Canadian Z259.16 it is essential to know the deployment force or average arrest force (Fa). Fa is necessary to estimate the elongation that the absorber will suffer during the fall and therefore essential data to calculate the clearance distance. There is a lack of useful experimental data for the design of this personal protective equipment (PPE). This work provides empirical data required for the design of FAS with EAL in accordance with EN 355. This paper covers different types of EAL that are marketed internationally; different empirical data, average and maximum forces, required for improving safety design are researched. Six manufacturers, 10 models, and 2 samples of each model were selected, with total of 20 tests being performed. Dynamic performance tests were carried out, the free fall of a person was simulated using a 100 kg steel ballast from the maximum height allowed by the equipment, obtaining the maximum arrest force (Fm), average deployment force (Fa), and, by calculating the balance of forces, the maximum and average acceleration suffered by the ballast during its arrest. In light of the results, relevant conclusions for user safety are obtained. It is feasible to raise the safety requirements established by the different standards. The Fm can be established below 6 kN in the EAL, and the Fa can be estimated at 87.5% of the Fm. The categorization of the force–time curve in fall arrest with EAL has been obtained. Two EAL purchased on the market exceed the Fm permitted, therefore it is recommended to increase the quality controls of EAL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 283 KiB  
Article
Accessing Occupational Health Services in the Southern African Development Community Region
by Masilu Daniel Masekameni, Dingani Moyo, Norman Khoza and Chimwemwe Chamdimba
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(18), 6767; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17186767 - 17 Sep 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2966
Abstract
Only 15% of the global population has access to occupational safety and health services. In Africa, only 5% of employees working from major establishments have access to occupational health services (OHS). Access to primary health care (PHC) services is addressed in many settings [...] Read more.
Only 15% of the global population has access to occupational safety and health services. In Africa, only 5% of employees working from major establishments have access to occupational health services (OHS). Access to primary health care (PHC) services is addressed in many settings and inclusion of OHS in these facilities might increase efficiency in preventing occupational diseases. A cross-sectional study was conducted in four Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries aiming at assessing the availability of OHS at PHC facilities and the organization of OHS. We conducted a literature review to assess the provision and organization of OHS services. In addition to the review, a total of 23 doctors from Zambia were interviewed using questionnaires in order to determine the availability of OHS and training. Consultations with heads of ministries were done in four SADC countries. Results showed that in the SADC region, OHS are fragmented and lack a comprehensive approach. In addition, out of 23 PHC facilities, only two (13%) provided occupational health and PHC. However, OHS provided at PHC facilities were limited to TB screening and audiometric testing. Our study showed a huge inadequacy of trained occupational health practitioners. This study supports the World Health Organization’s advocacy to integrate OHS at the PHC level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
33 pages, 7272 KiB  
Article
Development of the Protocol of the Occupational Risk Assessment Method for Construction Works: Level of Preventive Action
by Antonio José Carpio-de los Pinos and María de las Nieves González-García
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(17), 6369; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17176369 - 1 Sep 2020
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3218
Abstract
Risk assessment on a construction site is based on the probability and consequences of the accident. But due to the complexity of the construction processes, this new methodology for the evaluation of occupational risks, called Level of Preventive Action, develops a new parameter [...] Read more.
Risk assessment on a construction site is based on the probability and consequences of the accident. But due to the complexity of the construction processes, this new methodology for the evaluation of occupational risks, called Level of Preventive Action, develops a new parameter for evaluating preventive action based on documentary environment that reflects the complexity of the work units, location and interdependence, construction environment referred to construction and protection systems, and social environment relative to the perception of the environment and the workers’ emotional states. The evaluation criteria of the new method are established by developing the William T. Fine methodology and incorporating concepts such as risk tolerance, the importance of work and personal satisfaction, which justify the degree of correction of preventive actions. This methodology determines the amount of preventive action control that is required during the construction process. This research proposes a risk assessment protocol adapted to construction sites based on specialized technical observation with a psychosocial survey on site. Some results of the implementation of the method in real work are shown. In conclusion, the determining parameter towards optimal control of preventive action is the direct and active participation of workers in safety matters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

14 pages, 1032 KiB  
Article
The Effects of Chinese Seafarers’ Job Demands on Turnover Intention: The Role of Fun at Work
by Yuan Gu, Dongbei Liu, Guoping Zheng, Chuanyong Yang, Zhen Dong and Eugene Y. J. Tee
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5247; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145247 - 21 Jul 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 4111
Abstract
This study examines how an occupational commitment and a fun work environment serve as important mechanisms that influence the job demands–turnover intentions relationship. On the basis of the job demands–resources model, the study explored the relationship between job demands, occupational commitment, fun at [...] Read more.
This study examines how an occupational commitment and a fun work environment serve as important mechanisms that influence the job demands–turnover intentions relationship. On the basis of the job demands–resources model, the study explored the relationship between job demands, occupational commitment, fun at work, and turnover intention. The hypotheses were (1) that job demands would be positively associated with predicted turnover intention; (2) that occupational commitment would mediate the job demands–turnover intention link and (3) that a fun environment would moderate the relationship between job demands and occupational commitment and between job demands and turnover intention. The study sampled 294 seafarers using an online survey, and applied descriptive, correlative analysis and the PROCESS Macro to test the hypotheses. Findings provide preliminary support for the three hypotheses, and contribute to a better understanding of the mechanism determining seafarers’ turnover intention. The results suggest the importance of holding appropriate group activities on-board to help seafarers alleviate fatigue and stress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 616 KiB  
Article
Risk Factors for Collisions and Near-Miss Incidents Caused by Drowsy Bus Drivers
by Genta Miyama, Masakatsu Fukumoto, Ritsuko Kamegaya and Masahito Hitosugi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4370; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124370 - 18 Jun 2020
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 2984
Abstract
Serious accidents have been caused by drowsy bus drivers and have necessitated an examination of the risk factors involved. A questionnaire survey among employees of a bus company was conducted in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan in September 2014. Respondents were asked to report details [...] Read more.
Serious accidents have been caused by drowsy bus drivers and have necessitated an examination of the risk factors involved. A questionnaire survey among employees of a bus company was conducted in Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan in September 2014. Respondents were asked to report details of their work and life over the preceding month. The 301 valid responses by bus drivers (295 men and 6 women) with a mean age of 51.6 years (range: 24–73 years) were used for analysis. Univariable logistic regression showed that factors affecting the incidence of collisions and near-miss incidents by drowsy drivers were continued driving when feeling sick, reporting a physical condition, number of sleep hours, time spent with family, working hours, and nutritional balance. According to a multiple regression analysis, continued driving when feeling sick (odds ratio: 3.421, 95% confidence interval: 1.618–7.231) was the only significant risk for the event. Managers should encourage drivers to voluntarily report poor health and should provide opportunities to stop driving if drivers experience physical discomfort or sleepiness. To improve road safety, educational measures are required for both drivers and managers to prevent driving under poor health conditions, although the decision to stop driving depends on drivers’ subjective judgment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

30 pages, 5081 KiB  
Review
Factors Influencing Safety on Construction Projects (fSCPs): Types and Categories
by Felipe Muñoz-La Rivera, Javier Mora-Serrano and Eugenio Oñate
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10884; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010884 - 16 Oct 2021
Cited by 27 | Viewed by 5411
Abstract
Due to the fact of activity, environment and work dynamics, the construction industry is characterised by high accident rates. Different initiatives have emerged to reduce these figures, which focus on using new methodologies and technologies for safety management. Therefore, it is essential to [...] Read more.
Due to the fact of activity, environment and work dynamics, the construction industry is characterised by high accident rates. Different initiatives have emerged to reduce these figures, which focus on using new methodologies and technologies for safety management. Therefore, it is essential to know the key factors and their influence on safety in construction projects (fSCPs) to focus efforts on these elements. Through a systematic literature review, based on PRISMA methodology, this article identifies, describes and categorises 100 factors that affect construction safety. It thus contributes by providing a comprehensive general framework, unifying previous studies focused on specific geographic areas or case studies with factors not considered or insufficiently disaggregated, along with an absence of classifications focused on understanding where and how factors affect the different dimensions of construction projects. The 100 factors identified are described and categorised according to the dimensions and aspects of the project in which these have an impact, along with identifying whether they are shaping or immediate factors or originating influences for the generation of accidents. These factors, their description and classification are a key contribution to improving the systematic creation of safety and generating training and awareness materials to fully develop a safety culture in organisations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Technical and Scientific Research on Occupational Health and Safety)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop