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Novel Tools and Technologies for Monitoring Healthy Ageing

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Aging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2022) | Viewed by 5179

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London SW2 1PG, UK
Interests: ageing; molecular epidemiology; NMR metabolomics; LC-MS metabolomics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The number of adults over age 65 is expected to double in the next 40 years in the US, and the proportion of adults over age 65 in China is also projected to increase by twofold by 2050. Ageing populations will create significant challenges for global healthcare systems in the coming decades. Whilst declining physiological function is typical of the ageing process, the rates of decline differ considerably between individuals. Whilst some die of age-related disease in their 60s, others are still active into their 90s. Both genetic and environmental risk factors are likely to contribute towards health inequalities in the elderly, and new tools and technologies are urgently required to monitor and provide insights into the ageing process, and to identify public health measures needed to improve the lives of older people, their families, and their communities. 

Epigenetic clocks and other biological ageing markers have recently been proposed as valuable predictors of chronological age and mortality. Wearable devices and body sensors can monitor our physiological functions (respiration rate, skin perspiration, motion evaluation) and vital signs in real-time, encourage us to stay active, and enable elderly people to be more effectively cared for in the community. Whilst many of these devices and biomarkers are currently being evaluated in the community, their applications for improving health through enhanced monitoring appear promising, and may in time help to elucidate the link between health inequality and ageing in the elderly and inform public health policy making. 

This Special Issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current development and use of assessment tools and biomarkers of ageing/ aging in the community. We invite manuscript submissions from different disciplines, and accepted manuscript types may include original research articles, reviews, or methodological papers. Here are some examples of topics that could be addressed in this Special Issue: 

  • Indicators and tools for assessing functional and phenotypic age
  • Methodologies for measuring biological age
  • Molecular and biological predictors of aging/ageing
  • Remote technologies for monitoring functional age and age-related disease in the community
  • Environmental and socioeconomic risk factors for accelerated ageing

Dr. Chungho Lau
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ageing
  • aging
  • geriatrics
  • functional age
  • biological clocks
  • health indicators
  • age acceleration
  • health technology
  • epidemiology
  • molecular biomarkers

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

9 pages, 1422 KiB  
Article
Prediction Model including Gastrocnemius Thickness for the Skeletal Muscle Mass Index in Japanese Older Adults
by Satoshi Yuguchi, Ryoma Asahi, Tomohiko Kamo, Masato Azami and Hirofumi Ogihara
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(7), 4042; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19074042 - 29 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1543
Abstract
Non-invasive and easy alternative methods to indicate skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) have not been established when dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) cannot be performed. This study aims to construct a prediction model including gastrocnemius thickness using ultrasonography [...] Read more.
Non-invasive and easy alternative methods to indicate skeletal muscle mass index (SMI) have not been established when dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) or bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) cannot be performed. This study aims to construct a prediction model including gastrocnemius thickness using ultrasonography for skeletal muscle mass index (SMI). Total of 193 Japanese aged ≥65 years participated. SMI was measured by BIA, and subcutaneous fat thickness and gastrocnemius thickness in the medial gastrocnemius were measured by using ultrasonography, and age, gender and body mass index (BMI), grip strength, and gait speed were collected. The stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted, which incorporated SMI as a dependent variable and age, gender, BMI, gastrocnemius thickness, and other factors as independent variables. Gender, BMI, and gastrocnemius thickness were included as significant factors, and the formula: SMI = 1.27 × gender (men: 1, women: 0) + 0.18 × BMI + 0.09 × gastrocnemius thickness (mm) + 1.3 was shown as the prediction model for SMI (R = 0.89, R2 = 0.8, adjusted R2 = 0.8, p < 0.001). The prediction model for SMI had high accuracy and could be a non-invasive and easy alternative method to predict SMI in Japanese older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Tools and Technologies for Monitoring Healthy Ageing)
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11 pages, 530 KiB  
Article
Myostatin/Appendicular Skeletal Muscle Mass (ASM) Ratio, Not Myostatin, Is Associated with Low Handgrip Strength in Community-Dwelling Older Women
by Soo Jeong Choi, Min Sung Lee, Duk-Hee Kang, Gang Jee Ko, Hee-Sook Lim, Byung Chul Yu, Moo Yong Park, Jin Kuk Kim, Chul-Hee Kim, Seung Duk Hwang, Jun Chul Kim, Chang Won Won and Won Suk An
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7344; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147344 - 09 Jul 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2602
Abstract
Background/Aims: Elevated levels of serum myostatin have been proposed as a biomarker for sarcopenia. Recent studies have shown that elevated level of serum myostatin was associated with physical fitness and performance. This study aimed to examine the significance of myostatin in the association [...] Read more.
Background/Aims: Elevated levels of serum myostatin have been proposed as a biomarker for sarcopenia. Recent studies have shown that elevated level of serum myostatin was associated with physical fitness and performance. This study aimed to examine the significance of myostatin in the association between muscle mass and physical performance in the elderly. Methods: This cross-sectional study is based on the Korean Frailty and Aging Cohort study involving 1053 people aged 70 years or over. Anthropometric, physical performance, and laboratory data were collected. Results: The mean age of the participants was 75.8 years, and 50.7% of them were female. Serum myostatin levels in men (3.7 ± 1.2 vs. 3.2 ± 1.1 ng/mL, p < 0.001) were higher compared with that in women. Serum myostatin level was associated with appendicular skeletal muscle mass (ASM) index and eGFR by cystatin C. Serum myostatin/ASM ratio was associated with handgrip strength in women. Conclusion: Higher serum myostatin levels were related with higher muscle mass and better physical performances in the elderly. Serum myostatin/ASM ratio may be a predictor for physical performance rather than myostatin. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Tools and Technologies for Monitoring Healthy Ageing)
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