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Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2021) | Viewed by 23869

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Suicide Prevention Centre, Department of Neurosciences, Mental Health and Sensory Organs, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
Interests: suicide and suicide prevention; public health; well-being; youth mental health
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

I’m pleased to announce the Special Issue entitled “Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention”. This is a collection of important high-quality papers (original research articles or comprehensive review papers) published in Open Access form by Editorial Board Members, or prominent scholars invited by the Editorial Office and the Editorial Board Members. This Special Issue aims to discuss new knowledge or new cutting-edge developments in the suicide prevention research field through selected works, which will make a great contribution to the community. We consider that this issue will be the best forum for disseminating excellent research findings as well as sharing innovative ideas in the field.

Papers could be either research papers with a detailed summary of their own work done so far, or papers highlighting the state-of-the-art developments in suicide prevention. Contributions to this important Special Issue will be accepted by invitation only. In order to benefit both authors and readers, published papers will be waived the publication fee.

You are welcome to send a tentative title and a short abstract to me for evaluation before submission. Please note that selected full papers will still be subjected to a thorough and rigorous peer-review.

I am looking forward to receiving your excellent work.

Prof. Dr. Maurizio Pompili
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Suicide
  • Prevention
  • Public health
  • Assessment
  • Management
  • Empathy

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 309 KiB  
Article
The Characteristics of Mood Polarity, Temperament, and Suicide Risk in Adult ADHD
by Giancarlo Giupponi, Marco Innamorati, Elena Rogante, Salvatore Sarubbi, Denise Erbuto, Ignazio Maniscalco, Livia Sanna, Andreas Conca, David Lester and Maurizio Pompili
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(8), 2871; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17082871 - 21 Apr 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3242
Abstract
The present study was designed to shed light on a topic rarely explored and to suggest possible ways to detect risk factors for the presence of suicidal ideation and behaviors in a sample of adult patients with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This study [...] Read more.
The present study was designed to shed light on a topic rarely explored and to suggest possible ways to detect risk factors for the presence of suicidal ideation and behaviors in a sample of adult patients with Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). This study also explored the association between ADHD, affective temperaments, the presence of hypomania symptoms, and suicide risk. We hypothesized that (compared to healthy controls) (1) patients with adult ADHD would report more negative affective temperaments and more hypomania symptoms and (2) that they would have a higher suicide risk. The participants included 63 consecutive adult inpatients (18 women, 45 men) with ADHD and 69 healthy controls (42 women, 22 men). All participants were administered the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), the Hypomania Check-List-32 (HCL-32), the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), the Temperament Evaluation for Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego (TEMPS-A), and the Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS). Forty-six percent of the ADHD patients had an Axis 1 comorbid disorder. ADHD patients (compared to controls) more often reported suicidal ideation (46.0% vs. 5.9%, one-way Fisher exact test p < 0.001; phi = 0.46). ADHD patients and the controls also significantly differed in all the scales administered (with Cohen’s d between 0.92–4.70), except for the TEMPS-A Hyperthymia scale. A regression model indicated that ADHD was independently associated with higher scores of a negative temperaments/hypomania factor (Odd Ratio = 14.60) but not with suicidal ideation. A high incidence of suicidal ideation, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and negative affective temperaments was reported in adult ADHD patients, and clinicians should routinely assess risk factors for suicide among these patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
12 pages, 535 KiB  
Article
Demoralization and Its Relationship with Depression and Hopelessness in Suicidal Patients Attending an Emergency Department
by Alessandra Costanza, Marc Baertschi, Hélène Richard-Lepouriel, Kerstin Weber, Isabella Berardelli, Maurizio Pompili and Alessandra Canuto
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2232; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072232 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 41 | Viewed by 4401
Abstract
Emergency departments (EDs) play an increasingly crucial role in the management of patients with suicidal behavior (SB). Demoralization has been associated with SB in various populations and conditions, but little is known about the effect of this construct in SB patients who attend [...] Read more.
Emergency departments (EDs) play an increasingly crucial role in the management of patients with suicidal behavior (SB). Demoralization has been associated with SB in various populations and conditions, but little is known about the effect of this construct in SB patients who attend an ED. Therefore, a more inclusive SB assessment which considers the demoralization construct could be useful in clinical practice. The main aim of this study was to assess the presence and severity of demoralization in patients visiting EDs for SB. Secondly, the maintenance of the relationship between demoralization and SB after controlling for depression and the proportion of variance which accounted for hopelessness was investigated. A cross-sectional study of patients (N = 199) visiting an ED for SB was performed, which examined the role of demoralization, hopelessness, and depression on suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SAs). Demoralization was strongly and positively correlated with SI. Demoralization was related to major depressive episodes, but it was confirmed to be a different and, probably, more sensitive construct for SB, validating its specificity in relation to depression. Hopelessness accounted for a small portion of the variance in SI, compared to demoralization. Formal support for the association of demoralization with SI was provided. Demoralization can improve SB assessment in EDs, particularly among patients whose suicide risk can be unnoticed. Furthermore, demoralization represents a clinically useful concept to increase comprehension of the suffering of the suicidal patient and a possible target for psychotherapeutic interventions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
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15 pages, 316 KiB  
Article
Carers’ Motivations for, and Experiences of, Participating in Suicide Research
by Myfanwy Maple, Sarah Wayland, Rebecca Sanford, Ailbhe Spillane and Sarah Coker
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1733; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051733 - 06 Mar 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
(1) Background: First-hand accounts of lived experience of suicide remain rare in the research literature. Increasing interest in the lived experience of suicide is resulting in more opportunities for people to participate in research based on their personal experience. How individuals choose to [...] Read more.
(1) Background: First-hand accounts of lived experience of suicide remain rare in the research literature. Increasing interest in the lived experience of suicide is resulting in more opportunities for people to participate in research based on their personal experience. How individuals choose to participate in research, and their experience of doing so, are important considerations in the ethical conduct of research. (2) Methods: To understand the experience of providing care for someone who has previously attempted suicide, a cross-sectional online community survey was conducted. This survey concluded with questions regarding motivation to participate and the experience of doing so. Of the 758 individuals who participated in the survey, 545 provided open-ended text responses to questions regarding motivation and 523 did so for questions regarding the experience of participating. It is these responses that are the focus of this paper. Data were analysed thematically. (3) Results: Motivations to participate were expressed as primarily altruistic in nature, with a future focus on improving the experience of the person who had attempted suicide alongside carers to ease distress. The experience of participating was difficult yet manageable, for all but a few participants. (4) Conclusions: With the increasing interest in first-hand accounts of suicide, how individuals experience participation in research is an important focus that requires further attention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
14 pages, 1309 KiB  
Article
Perfectionism and Prospective Near-Term Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors: The Mediation of Fear of Humiliation and Suicide Crisis Syndrome
by Tyler Pia, Igor Galynker, Allison Schuck, Courtney Sinclair, Gelan Ying and Raffaella Calati
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(4), 1424; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17041424 - 22 Feb 2020
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 4801
Abstract
Background: Perfectionism has been linked to suicide. According to the Narrative-Crisis Model of suicide, individuals with trait vulnerabilities are prone to develop a certain mindset, known as a Suicidal Narrative, which may precipitate the Suicide Crisis Syndrome (SCS), culminating in suicide. The [...] Read more.
Background: Perfectionism has been linked to suicide. According to the Narrative-Crisis Model of suicide, individuals with trait vulnerabilities are prone to develop a certain mindset, known as a Suicidal Narrative, which may precipitate the Suicide Crisis Syndrome (SCS), culminating in suicide. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between perfectionism (trait vulnerability), fear of humiliation (component of the Suicidal Narrative), SCS, and prospective near-term suicidal thoughts and behaviors (STB). Methods: Adult psychiatric outpatient participants (N = 336) were assessed at baseline with the Suicidal Narrative Inventory for perfectionism and fear of humiliation. The questions used to assess perfectionism were adapted from the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale. The severity of the SCS was calculated using the Suicide Crisis Inventory. STB were assessed at baseline and after one month using the Columbia Suicide Severity Rating Scale. Serial mediation analyses were conducted using PROCESS version 3.3 in SPSS. Results: While the direct effect of perfectionism on prospective STB was not significant (b = 0.01, p = 0.19), the indirect effect of perfectionism on STB, through serial mediation by fear of humiliation and the SCS, was significant (indirect effect p = 0.007, 95% CI [0.003, 0.013]). The indirect effect was not significant for models that did not include both mediators. Limitations: Variables were assessed at one time only. Conclusion: Perfectionism did not directly modulate STB. Perfectionism may be related to suicidal behavior through fear of humiliation, leading to the SCS. These results support the Narrative-Crisis Model of suicide and clarify the role of perfectionism in the etiology of suicide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
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7 pages, 290 KiB  
Article
Projective Technique Testing Approach to the Understanding of Psychological Pain in Suicidal and Non-Suicidal Psychiatric Inpatients
by Isabella Berardelli, Salvatore Sarubbi, Alessandra Spagnoli, Chiara Fina, Elena Rogante, Denise Erbuto, Marco Innamorati, David Lester and Maurizio Pompili
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(1), 284; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17010284 - 31 Dec 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3018
Abstract
Psychological pain is a core clinical factor for understanding suicide, independently from depression. The aim of this study is to assess the role of psychological pain on suicide risk and to evaluate the relationship between psychache and different psychiatric disorders. We conducted the [...] Read more.
Psychological pain is a core clinical factor for understanding suicide, independently from depression. The aim of this study is to assess the role of psychological pain on suicide risk and to evaluate the relationship between psychache and different psychiatric disorders. We conducted the present cross-sectional study on 291 inpatients with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. We administered Shneidman’s Psychological Pain Assessment Scale (PPAS) for the assessment of mental pain and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) for the assessment of suicide risk. There was a significant association between current psychache and worst-ever psychache and suicide risk in inpatients affected by a depressive disorder, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Furthermore, we found a significant difference in current psychache between inpatients with major depressive disorder and inpatients with schizophrenia and in worst-ever psychache between inpatients with bipolar disorder and inpatients with schizophrenia, with lower scores in inpatients with schizophrenia. The assessment of psychache appears to be useful for predicting suicidal risk and should be used routinely for identifying and treating suicide risk in clinical practice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)

Review

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22 pages, 677 KiB  
Review
A Specific Inflammatory Profile Underlying Suicide Risk? Systematic Review of the Main Literature Findings
by Gianluca Serafini, Valentina Maria Parisi, Andrea Aguglia, Andrea Amerio, Gaia Sampogna, Andrea Fiorillo, Maurizio Pompili and Mario Amore
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(7), 2393; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17072393 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 116 | Viewed by 4404
Abstract
Consistent evidence indicates the association between inflammatory markers and suicidal behavior. The burden related to immunological differences have been widely documented in both major affective disorders and suicidal behavior. Importantly, abnormally elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines levels have been reported to correlate with suicidal behavior [...] Read more.
Consistent evidence indicates the association between inflammatory markers and suicidal behavior. The burden related to immunological differences have been widely documented in both major affective disorders and suicidal behavior. Importantly, abnormally elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines levels have been reported to correlate with suicidal behavior but whether and to what extent specific inflammatory cytokines abnormalities may contribute to our understanding of the complex pathophysiology of suicide is unknown. The present manuscript aimed to systematically review the current literature about the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in suicidal behavior. Most studies showed a link between abnormally higher interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), kynurenic acid (KYN), and lower IL-2, IL-4, and interferon (IFN)-γ levels in specific brain regions and suicidal behavior. Unfortunately, most studies are not able to exclude the exact contribution of major depressive disorder (MDD) as a mediator/moderator of the link between inflammatory cytokines abnormalities and suicidal behavior. The association between suicidal patients (both suicide attempters or those with suicidal ideation) and the altered immune system was documented by most studies, but this does not reflect the existence of a specific causal link. Additional studies are needed to clarify the immune pathways underlying suicidal behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers: New Trends in Suicide Prevention)
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