Advances in Greenhouse Horticulture

A topical collection in Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This collection belongs to the section "Protected Culture".

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Editors


E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Department of Horticulture, Aristotle University, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: cultivation techniques for vegetable production; quality of vegetable products; hydroponic vegetable production; postharvest physiology of vegetables; role of light on vegetables’ growth; quality of seedlings; quality and seed germination; vegetable grafting; innovative forms of vegetable products; organic cultivation of vegetables
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Collection Editor
Institute of Plant Breeding and Genetic Resources, Hellenic Agricultural Organization-Dimitra, 57001 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: net-zero energy greenhouse; plant factories; controlled environment production; energy use efficiency; renewable energy technologies; microclimate; product carbon footprint
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food security, supply chain issues and climate change are key challenges for horticultural production. Greenhouse production could be used to mitigate potential adverse effects of climate change and to address the above problems. However, greenhouse gas emissions associated with greenhouse production strategies are a central issue in many countries. At present, it is crucial to implement policies aiming at affordable and clean energy, climate action or the extinction of hunger and poverty—objectives set by the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Renewable energy sources (RES) can lead to sustainable greenhouses. Moreover, consumers are asking for greenhouse products of a high quality and with a neutral environmental impact. The carbon footprint regarding horticultural production is an effective tool to strengthen the environmentally conscious purchasing behavior of the consumer.

The purpose of this Topical Collection titled “Advances in Greenhouse Horticulture” is to present innovative studies, tools, approaches and techniques, such as the use of biostimulant application, hydroponics systems, energy use efficiency and renewable energy technologies and any other innovation that has improved the efficiency and sustainability of greenhouse horticultural crops, for the production of high-quality commodities.

Dr. Athanasios Koukounaras
Dr. Georgios Ntinas
Collection Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydroponics
  • biostimulants
  • biodiversity
  • organic horticulture
  • supply chain
  • sustainability
  • resource use efficiency
  • environmental impact

Published Papers (2 papers)

2023

Jump to: 2022

12 pages, 1037 KiB  
Article
Yield, Quality, and Resources Use Efficiency of Wild Rocket Baby Leaves Grown under Different Controlled Environment Systems and Various Growing Seasons
by Dimitrios Mainos, Filippos Bantis, Georgios K. Ntinas and Athanasios Koukounaras
Horticulturae 2023, 9(6), 661; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9060661 - 02 Jun 2023
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Abstract
Wild rocket is a leafy vegetable with economic interest as a consequence of baby leaf ready-to-eat salads. The climate crisis is expected to influence wild rocket production, but these effects could be confronted with cultivation in greenhouses and plant factories with artificial lighting [...] Read more.
Wild rocket is a leafy vegetable with economic interest as a consequence of baby leaf ready-to-eat salads. The climate crisis is expected to influence wild rocket production, but these effects could be confronted with cultivation in greenhouses and plant factories with artificial lighting (PFALs). Climate responses are related to growing seasons. Our objective was to test the impact of two growing seasons, winter and summer, on the growth and physiology of wild rocket baby leaves in different controlled environment systems (greenhouse and PFAL). The growth cycle was reduced by 27% in the PFAL compared to the greenhouse during winter. Summer yield was greater in the greenhouse, but leaf number and area were greater in the PFAL. The lowest water use efficiency was recorded in the greenhouse during summer. Energy use efficiency was lower in PFAL compared to the greenhouse. Land use efficiency was not affected by the growing system, but in PFALs it is able to increase it by growing in vertical layers. Relative chlorophyll content and total soluble solids were enhanced in the greenhouse. The photosynthetic efficiency evaluation showed considerable stress in summer-grown plants in the greenhouse, as shown by PIABS and φP0. In general, the production was similar in the PFAL regardless of seasons. Full article
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2022

Jump to: 2023

14 pages, 3427 KiB  
Article
Physiological and Yield Performance Is Partially Linked to Water Use Efficiency of Eggplant Genotypes in a High-Tech Glasshouse
by Fatemeh Rasouli, Mohammad Babla, Lihua Li, Weiguang Liang, Miing-Tiem Yong, Talaat Ahmed, David Tissue, Samsul Huda and Zhong-Hua Chen
Horticulturae 2023, 9(1), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae9010019 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2156
Abstract
Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) has become an increasingly common vegetable grown in glasshouses. This study emphasized on the physiological traits and productivity of three eggplant cultivars (Longa, Lydia, and Tracey) in a high-tech glasshouse to determine the genotypic differences of agronomical, morphological, [...] Read more.
Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) has become an increasingly common vegetable grown in glasshouses. This study emphasized on the physiological traits and productivity of three eggplant cultivars (Longa, Lydia, and Tracey) in a high-tech glasshouse to determine the genotypic differences of agronomical, morphological, and physiological responses. The physiological parameters as well as the productivity of these eggplant cultivars were evaluated. The results showed that Tracey had significantly higher leaf growth than Longa and Lydia. Longa exhibited significantly higher values of net CO2 assimilation (A), stomatal conductance (gs), and transpiration rate (Tr) than Tracey, whereas Tracey showed significantly larger gs, Tr, and intracellular CO2 concentration (Ci) than Lydia. Tracey showed a significantly higher number of flowers per node compared to the two other varieties, but the number of fruits did not statistically differ among cultivars. Tracy produced the highest yield (fruit weight and fruit yield per m2) due to the significantly higher leaf length and leaf expansion rate despite the lowest level of A among the three cultivars. Interestingly, the higher yield of Tracey translated into better water use efficiency (WUE) in the agronomic term, but its intrinsic WUE (A/gs) was the lowest among the three cultivars. However, significant correlations between photosynthetic parameters and WUE were only found in certain stages of eggplant growth. Therefore, further research work with an emphasis on the source and sink partitioning of a large number of eggplant genotypes is required to investigate the varietal performance of greenhouse eggplants. Then, the information can be translated into protected cropping to set up the growth benchmark for large-scale sustainable production of eggplants with better yield and less water consumption for the horticultural industry. Full article
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