Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Perinatal and Neonatal Medicine".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2021) | Viewed by 13145

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Neonatal Immunology and Microbiology, Medolac Laboratories A Public Benefit Corporation, Boulder City, NV 89005, USA
2. Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003, USA
Interests: premature infant; neonate; COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; antibodies; pathogens; adaptive immune cells; infectious diseases; breastfeeding; immunization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nutrition influences maternal health and immune and nutritive components in milk from lactating women. These human milk components will impact infant outcomes include antibodies, cytokines, growth factors, lactoferrin and oligosaccharides. They are critical for the prevention of neonatal infectious diseases, growth development and tolerance (reduction of allergy), especially for their immature gut. However, there is a lack of knowledge on how maternal nutrition influences the breastmilk components and improves infant outcomes.

This Special Issue of Healthcare will focus on the impact of maternal nutrition on neonatal growth development and prevention of infection and allergy. This Special Issue will include original research and reviews, short reports, opinions from researchers and epidemiological and animal studies.

Dr. Veronique Demers-Mathieu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Infection
  • gut
  • passive immunity
  • immunization
  • breastfeeding
  • mucosal response
  • nutrition
  • antibodies
  • immunotolerance
  • growth factors, cytokine, maternal health.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 665 KiB  
Article
Association of Maternal Observation and Motivation (MOM) Program with m-Health Support on Maternal and Newborn Health
by Premalatha Paulsamy, Vigneshwaran Easwaran, Rizwan Ashraf, Shadia Hamoud Alshahrani, Krishnaraju Venkatesan, Absar Ahmed Qureshi, Mervat Moustafa Arrab, Kousalya Prabahar, Kalaiselvi Periannan, Rajalakshimi Vasudevan, Geetha Kandasamy, Kumarappan Chidambaram, Ester Mary Pappiya, Kumar Venkatesan and Vani Manoharan
Healthcare 2021, 9(12), 1629; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9121629 - 25 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2286
Abstract
Maternal and child nutrition has been a critical component of health, sustainable development, and progress in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). While a decrement in maternal mortality is an important indicator, simply surviving pregnancy and childbirth does not imply better maternal health. One [...] Read more.
Maternal and child nutrition has been a critical component of health, sustainable development, and progress in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). While a decrement in maternal mortality is an important indicator, simply surviving pregnancy and childbirth does not imply better maternal health. One of the fundamental obligations of nations under international human rights law is to enable women to endure pregnancy and delivery as an aspect of their enjoyment of reproductive and sexual health and rights and to live a dignified life. The aim of this study was to discover the correlation between the Maternal Observation and Motivation (MOM) program and m-Health support for maternal and newborn health. A comparative study was done among 196 pregnant mothers (study group—94; control group—102 mothers) with not less than 20 weeks of gestation. Maternal outcomes such as Hb and weight gain and newborn results such as birth weight and crown–heel length were obtained at baseline and at 28 and 36 weeks of gestation. Other secondary data collected were abortion, stillbirth, low birth weight, major congenital malformations, twin or triplet pregnancies, physical activity, and maternal well-being. The MOM intervention included initial face-to-face education, three in-person visits, and eight virtual health coaching sessions via WhatsApp. The baseline data on Hb of the mothers show that 31 (32.98%) vs. 27 (28.72%) mothers in the study and control group, respectively, had anemia, which improved to 27.66% and 14.98% among study group mothers at 28 and 36 weeks of gestation (p < 0.001). The weight gain (p < 0.001), level of physical activity (p < 0.001), and maternal well-being (p < 0.01) also had significant differences after the intervention. Even after controlling for potentially confounding variables, the maternal food practices regression model revealed that birth weight was directly correlated with the consumption of milk (p < 0.001), fruits (p < 0.01), and green vegetables (p < 0.05). As per the physical activity and maternal well-being regression model, the birth weight and crown–heel length were strongly related with the physical activity and maternal well-being of mothers at 36 weeks of gestation (p < 0.05). Combining the MOM intervention with standard antenatal care is a safe and effective way to improve maternal welfare while upholding pregnant mothers’ human rights. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health)
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9 pages, 471 KiB  
Article
Perception and Awareness about Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip in Children among Pregnant Ladies in the Aseer Region, Southwestern Saudi Arabia
by Mahdi M. Alqarni, Ayed A. Shati, Youssef A. Al-Qahtani, Wafaa S. Alhifzi, Wael S. Alhifzi, Rasha S. Al Saleh, Nada A. Alqahtani and Mohammed A. Alshehri
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1384; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101384 - 16 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2445
Abstract
Background: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is classified as a group of malformations, varying from abnormal acetabulum (dysplasia) and mild subluxation of the femoral head to fixed displacement (congenital dislocation). This study aimed to assess the knowledge level and its determinants regarding [...] Read more.
Background: Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is classified as a group of malformations, varying from abnormal acetabulum (dysplasia) and mild subluxation of the femoral head to fixed displacement (congenital dislocation). This study aimed to assess the knowledge level and its determinants regarding DDH in children among pregnant females in the Aseer region of southwestern Saudi Arabia. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted targeting all pregnant females in the Aseer region between 1 February 2021 and 1 May 2021. A pre-structured online questionnaire was constructed by the researchers to obtain the participating females’ bio-demographic data (including age, education status, and obstetric history) and awareness regarding DDH. The last section asked for their source of information regarding DDH. Results: A total of 253 pregnant females (aged between 18 and 45 years; mean age = 30.5 ± 10.2 years) fulfilling the inclusion criteria completed the study questionnaire. About 5% of the females reported having a child with DDH, and 166 (65.6%) pregnant females knew about DDH. Additionally, 110 (43.5%) females reported that they know about how DDH is treated, and 99 (39.1%) knew about DDH complications. The most commonly reported source of information was relatives and friends (44.3%), followed by social media (11.9%) and study and work (7.1%). Conclusions: Pregnant females in the Aseer region have poor knowledge and awareness about DDH and its causes, treatment modalities, and complications. Higher knowledge was associated with either high parity or having a child with DDH. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health)
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13 pages, 278 KiB  
Article
“It Is a Very Emotional Topic for Me”—Managing Breastfeeding Problems among German Mothers: A Qualitative Approach
by Mariz Spannhake, Charlotte Jansen, Tatiana Görig and Katharina Diehl
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1352; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101352 - 11 Oct 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2321
Abstract
Breastfeeding is associated with positive health outcomes for both child and mother. Nevertheless, some women experience breastfeeding problems which commonly lead to early cessation, or not starting breastfeeding at all. Our aim was to explore how women that have difficulties in breastfeeding perceive [...] Read more.
Breastfeeding is associated with positive health outcomes for both child and mother. Nevertheless, some women experience breastfeeding problems which commonly lead to early cessation, or not starting breastfeeding at all. Our aim was to explore how women that have difficulties in breastfeeding perceive their situation and how they actively manage it. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 mothers living in Germany who had experienced breastfeeding problems. The interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Breastfeeding problems occurred due to different reasons and had a huge impact, as evidenced in the four main themes of the findings: individual situation, managing the situation, perceived consequences for relations, feelings, and potential future pregnancies, and perceived health consequences for the mother. They frequently experienced negative emotions, including psychological distress and mental health problems, with perceived negative consequences for the mother–infant-bonding. Trying to actively manage the situation and availability of social support seemed to have a relieving effect, whereas confrontation and lack of understanding worsened the situation. Breastfeeding problems and the inability to breastfeed can have a great influence on maternal well-being. These can affect different aspects of a mother’s life, including the attachment to the child. Providing support for actively managing the situation and supporting the exchange of experience between mothers who perceive breastfeeding problems may help mothers to better deal with their situation. Our findings may help health professionals to understand what these mothers feel and how they can support these women in a sensitive way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health)
13 pages, 488 KiB  
Article
We Won’t Go There: Barriers to Accessing Maternal and Newborn Care in District Thatta, Pakistan
by Muhammad Asim, Sarah Saleem, Zarak Husain Ahmed, Imran Naeem, Farina Abrejo, Zafar Fatmi and Sameen Siddiqi
Healthcare 2021, 9(10), 1314; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9101314 - 01 Oct 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2711
Abstract
Accessibility and utilization of healthcare plays a significant role in preventing complications during pregnancy, labor, and the early postnatal period. However, multiple barriers can prevent women from accessing services. The aim of this study was to explore the multifaceted barriers that inhibit women [...] Read more.
Accessibility and utilization of healthcare plays a significant role in preventing complications during pregnancy, labor, and the early postnatal period. However, multiple barriers can prevent women from accessing services. The aim of this study was to explore the multifaceted barriers that inhibit women from seeking maternal and newborn health care in Thatta, Sindh, Pakistan. This study employed an interpretive research design using a purposive sampling approach. Pre-tested, semi-structured interview guides were used for data collection. The data were collected through eight focus group discussions with men and women, and six in-depth interviews with lady health workers and analyzed through thematic analysis. The study identified individual, sociocultural, and structural-level barriers that inhibit women from seeking maternal and newborn care. Individual barriers included mistrust towards public health facilities and inadequate symptom recognition. The three identified sociocultural barriers were aversion to biomedical interventions, gendered imbalances in decision making, and women’s restricted mobility. The structural barriers included ineffective referral systems and prohibitively expensive transportation services. Increasing the coverage of healthcare service without addressing the multifaceted barriers that influence service utilization will not reduce the burden of maternal and neonatal mortality. As this study reveals, care seeking is influenced by a diverse array of barriers that are individual, sociocultural, and structural in nature. A combination of capacity development, health awareness, and structural interventions can address many if not all of these barriers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health)
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Review

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11 pages, 918 KiB  
Review
The Potential Benefit of Hydroxychloroquine in Chronic Placental Inflammation of Unknown Etiology Associated with Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes
by Alexandra Bouariu, Nicolae Gică, Anca Marina Ciobanu, Ana Maria Scutelnicu, Mihaela Roxana Popescu and Anca Maria Panaitescu
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 168; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010168 - 17 Jan 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2706
Abstract
The placenta is the site of connection between maternal and fetal circulation, and the liaison is established early in pregnancy. A large variety of pregnancy complications such as preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, or pregnancy loss have placental expression and can be accompanied [...] Read more.
The placenta is the site of connection between maternal and fetal circulation, and the liaison is established early in pregnancy. A large variety of pregnancy complications such as preterm birth, fetal growth restriction, or pregnancy loss have placental expression and can be accompanied in some cases of acute or chronic identifiable placental inflamatory lesions. Chronic placental inflammatory (CPI) lesions include chronic villitis of unknow etiology (CVUE), chronic intervillositis of unknown etiology, CIUE (also described as chronic histiocytic intervillositis, CHI), and chronic deciduits. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) has been prescribed with good results during pregnancy to prevent adverse perinatal outcomes in maternal autoimmune conditions. Its success has paved the way to its use in CPI as CIUE/CHI; however, to date, there are no prospective, informatively designed, controlled studies on its value in these setting. This review aims to explore the potential role of HCQ in CPI of unknown etiology. Ideally, properly designed, probably multicentric studies should be undertaken to fully understand HCQ’s role for prevention of adverse pregnancy outcomes after a chronic placental inflammation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Maternal Nutrition on Neonatal Health)
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