Nutrition and Supplementation for Human Performance

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2958

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Camilo José Cela University, 28692 Villanueva de la Cañada, Spain
Interests: caffeine; fat oxidation; substrate oxidation; sport performance; physiology; mechanism

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human performance addresses a broad spectrum of conditions, from increasing cognitive abilities, fighting disease or to enhancing athletic performance. Thus, tools have been constantly sought to improve and optimize human capabilities, including supplementation and nutrition.

Nowadays, food and nutritional strategies become more important for the care of people who want to optimize their psychological and physical performance, as well as for those who want to maintain a healthy lifestyle, being the nutritional management fundamental to maximize it. Optimizing the diet, both natural and supplemented, may have beneficial effects on health markers, as well as responses for sports and cognitive performance. Consequently, the trend to investigate these supplements and different nutritional strategies seem important to advance in the knowledge of the effects on performance along with different physiological variables.

Different dietary strategies and ergogenic aids may be effective for the study of human performance benefits: caffeine, creatine, carnosine, BCAA, protein or diets high in fats, carbohydrates or proteins, vegan or vegetarian diets... Therefore, this special issue will accept original research articles, reviews and meta-analyses. Researching areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

Systematic reviews and meta-analyses of the use of sports supplementation or effects of nutrition on human performance or disease control.

Validation studies of different instruments for the measurement of human performance.

Original studies with experimental designs using nutrition or supplementation for the improvement of human performance, such as cognitive, sport, or health improvement.

Mini-reviews of sports supplementation or nutritional strategies.

Developing specific cases to your own health benefit.

Dr. Carlos Ruiz-Moreno
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • caffeine
  • creatine
  • p-Synephrine
  • Beta-alanine
  • dietary strategies
  • metabolism
  • fat oxidation
  • carbohydrate oxidation
  • body composition
  • microbiote
  • healthcare
  • supplements
  • ergogenic aids
  • sport performance
  • cognitive performance
  • carbohydrates
  • lipds
  • proteins
  • vegan
  • vegetarian

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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26 pages, 1180 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Experiences and Perspectives of Division III Athletes Regarding Personalized Nutrition Plans for Improved Performance—A Qualitative Investigation
by James Stavitz and Thomas Koc
Healthcare 2024, 12(9), 923; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12090923 - 30 Apr 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: This qualitative study explores Division III college student-athletes’ experiences and perceptions of personalized nutrition plans in collegiate sports settings. (2) Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted using a general qualitative research design. Using a grounded theory approach, a thematic analysis was utilized [...] Read more.
(1) Background: This qualitative study explores Division III college student-athletes’ experiences and perceptions of personalized nutrition plans in collegiate sports settings. (2) Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted using a general qualitative research design. Using a grounded theory approach, a thematic analysis was utilized to analyze the interview transcripts, allowing for the identification of recurring themes and patterns. (3) Results: A total of 30 Division III college student-athletes, 16 males (53.3%) and 14 females (46.7%), representing a diverse range of sports disciplines, engaged in discussions about personalized nutrition plans. Analysis of the data revealed five main themes: (1) Nutritional Knowledge and Awareness, (2) Perceived Benefits of Personalized Nutrition Plans, (3) Challenges and Barriers to Implementation, (4) Influence of Team Culture and Environment, and (5) Suggestions for Improvement. (4) Conclusion: This study sheds light on the complexities of implementing personalized nutrition plans in collegiate sports settings and emphasizes the need for comprehensive, athlete-centered approaches to optimize performance and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Supplementation for Human Performance)
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15 pages, 940 KiB  
Article
Supplement Consumption by Elite Soccer Players: Differences by Competitive Level, Playing Position, and Sex
by Jaime Sebastiá-Rico, José Miguel Martínez-Sanz, Jesús Sanchis-Chordà, Miguel Alonso-Calvar, Pedro López-Mateu, David Romero-García and Jose M. Soriano
Healthcare 2024, 12(4), 496; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12040496 - 19 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1331
Abstract
Soccer is a sport practiced all over the world and whose practice begins in young athletes. Currently, the consumption of nutritional supplements is essential to achieve the maximum performance of players. The aim of this study was to describe the consumption of sports [...] Read more.
Soccer is a sport practiced all over the world and whose practice begins in young athletes. Currently, the consumption of nutritional supplements is essential to achieve the maximum performance of players. The aim of this study was to describe the consumption of sports supplements (CSS) by elite soccer players and its association with their competitive level, playing position, and sex. A comparative descriptive and non-experimental study was performed during the 2021–2022 competitive season. A total of 70 elite players completed one online questionnaire about their CSS. We found that sports drinks (55.7%), sports bars (50.0%), whey protein (48.6%), caffeine (47.1%), and creatine (60.0%) were the most consumed supplements by the total sample. Relative to the categories, the CSS was higher in the senior teams for both men and women. Regarding playing positions, caffeine was more consumed by midfielders and forwards (p = 0.013). Finally, in relation to sex, significant differences were found in the consumption of sports confectionery (p = 0.036), whey protein (p = 0.002), β-alanine (p = 0.013), and melatonin (p = 0.016). Soccer club SS questionnaires gather data to understand patterns, assess effectiveness and risks, and aid research. In conclusion, differences were found in the CSS according to competitive level, sex, and playing position. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Supplementation for Human Performance)
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7 pages, 435 KiB  
Case Report
The 8:1:1 Supplementation of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in High-Intensity Training: A Case Study of the Protective Effect on Rhabdomyolysis
by Angel Vicario-Merino, Marcos A. Soriano, Ester Jiménez-Ormeño, Carlos Ruiz-Moreno, Cesar Gallo-Salazar and Francisco Areces-Corcuera
Healthcare 2024, 12(8), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12080866 - 22 Apr 2024
Viewed by 671
Abstract
Introduction: The increasing prevalence of high-intensity sports activities, notably the burgeoning popularity of CrossFit, underscores the contemporary significance of such physical pursuits. The discernible protective impact of branched-chain amino acids on muscle fatigue and injuries is emerging as a noteworthy area of investigation. [...] Read more.
Introduction: The increasing prevalence of high-intensity sports activities, notably the burgeoning popularity of CrossFit, underscores the contemporary significance of such physical pursuits. The discernible protective impact of branched-chain amino acids on muscle fatigue and injuries is emerging as a noteworthy area of investigation. Within the realm of sports, integrating BCAA supplementation into dietary practices holds promise for aiding athletes in their recovery, particularly in mitigating Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness. Methodology: This study adopted an experimental pilot design with repeated measures, employing a controlled and randomized approach through double-blind procedures. The participant engaged in high-intensity activity, specifically the CrossFit Karen® test, which entailed executing 150 wall ball throws (9 kg) to a height of 3 m. The trial incorporated three randomized supplementation conditions: BCAAs in an 8:1:1 ratio or a 2:1:1 ratio or a placebo condition. The participant consumed 15 g daily for 7 days, commencing 72 h prior to the initial blood sample and the first Karen® test. Results: In this study, BCAA supplementation at an 8:1:1 ratio demonstrated a discernible protective effect against muscular damage, as evidenced by creatine kinase values and ratings of perceived exertion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutrition and Supplementation for Human Performance)
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