Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 6451

Special Issue Editor

Department of Anesthesia, Intensive Care and Emergency, Molinette Hospital and University of Turin, 10126 Turin, Italy
Interests: nutrition support in cancer and critically ill patients; vascular access devices; palliative care (screening and symptom control) in advanced cancer patients and seriously ill patients with end-stage organ failure; healthcare service management (in-hospital admission and management; safe discharge)
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue focuses on crucial themes aligned to improve the quality, safety, timely information exchange, and efficiency of patient care/resident services in healthcare organizations, including senior care facilities. This Special Issue emphasizes the performance improvement initiatives, clinical effectiveness and outcomes, patient and staff safety, employee engagement, organizational effectiveness, strategies to prevent adverse and sentinel events, incident reports, and interprofessional programs for enhancing the quality of care in healthcare facilities.

In this Special Issue, reviews are welcome.  Research areas may include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • Healthcare quality;
  • Patient safety;
  • Timely information exchange;
  • The efficiency of patient care/resident services.

I look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Paolo Cotogni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthcare quality
  • patient safety
  • timely information exchange
  • efficiency of patient care/resident services

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Service Quality and Related Factors in Primary Health Care Services: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Mehmet Sait Değer and Halim İşsever
Healthcare 2024, 12(10), 965; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12100965 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 756
Abstract
Primary health care services aim to prevent diseases and improve health efficiently and effectively. This study measures perceived service quality in a primary healthcare organization and examines the effect of personality traits on service quality. The cross-sectional study population comprised individuals over the [...] Read more.
Primary health care services aim to prevent diseases and improve health efficiently and effectively. This study measures perceived service quality in a primary healthcare organization and examines the effect of personality traits on service quality. The cross-sectional study population comprised individuals over the age of 18 who applied to the Bingöl Central Community Health Centre. A total of 460 participants were included in the study between November 2018 and March 2019. The participants completed a face-to-face questionnaire that included socio-demographic characteristics, the SERVQUAL Scale, and an abbreviated form of the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. This study is based on doctoral research in public health. The study found median values for personality trait sub-dimensions as follows: neuroticism: 2, psychoticism: 2.65, extraversion: 4, and lying: 5. The SERVQUAL Score was −0.02. The study revealed that the quality of primary health care services did not meet the participants’ expectations. The study findings also indicated that age, educational attainment, and extraverted and psychotic personality traits were significantly associated with the satisfaction of service quality expectations (p < 0.05). It is recommended to provide primary health care services in facilities with good physical characteristics, with sufficient and competent health personnel, and in a timely and accurate manner to improve service quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
9 pages, 248 KiB  
Article
Incidence and Factors Associated with Falls in Older People in a Long-Term Care Facility: A Prospective Study in Taiwan
by Hung-Chun Lee, Chia-Jung Hsieh and Jih-Shuin Jerng
Healthcare 2024, 12(10), 959; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12100959 - 7 May 2024
Viewed by 688
Abstract
Background: The effectiveness of applying a fall-risk assessment to prevent falls in residents of long-term care facilities has not been investigated. Methods: This prospective study enrolled elderly residents in a long-term care facility in Taiwan. Caregivers were provided with a health-status assessment and [...] Read more.
Background: The effectiveness of applying a fall-risk assessment to prevent falls in residents of long-term care facilities has not been investigated. Methods: This prospective study enrolled elderly residents in a long-term care facility in Taiwan. Caregivers were provided with a health-status assessment and fall-risk data to enhance their fall-prevention practices. A multivariate analysis was performed to identify the factors associated with falls. Results: A total of 123 subjects, including 68 and 55 for general and nursing-care models, respectively, were assessed. Their health status and risk of falls were provided to the care units to enhance their fall-prevention practices. Subjects in the nursing-care model had more dementia and more prescribed medications, worse physiologic conditions, and higher fall risk. Of them, 28 (23%) had subsequent falls. A univariate analysis showed that those with and without falls were similar in demographic characteristics, prescribed medications, physiologic function, and fall risk. There was a tendency for more falls in the nursing-care model residents (accounting for 61% of those who fell; p = 0.053). A regression analysis showed that gender (beta = 1.359; 95% confidence interval = 0.345–2.374; p = 0.010) and NPI score (beta = 0.101; 95% CI = 0.001–0.200; p = 0.047) were associated with the risk of falls. Conclusion: Residents at the long-term care facility had a significant risk of falls despite knowledge of their fall risk and the implementation of preventive measures. In this context of being aware of the risk, gender, and psychiatric symptoms were significantly associated with falls. Caregivers at long-term care facilities should implement further measures to prevent falls based on behavioral and psychological symptoms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
16 pages, 309 KiB  
Article
An Exploratory Analysis of the Association between Hospital Quality Measures and Financial Performance
by Brad Beauvais, Diane Dolezel and Zo Ramamonjiarivelo
Healthcare 2023, 11(20), 2758; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11202758 - 18 Oct 2023
Viewed by 2372
Abstract
Hospitals are perpetually challenged by concurrently improving the quality of healthcare and maintaining financial solvency. Both issues are among the top concerns for hospital executives across the United States, yet some have questioned if the efforts to enhance quality are financially sustainable. Thus, [...] Read more.
Hospitals are perpetually challenged by concurrently improving the quality of healthcare and maintaining financial solvency. Both issues are among the top concerns for hospital executives across the United States, yet some have questioned if the efforts to enhance quality are financially sustainable. Thus, the aim of this study is to examine if efforts to improve quality in the hospital setting have a corresponding association with hospital profitability. Recent and directly relevant research on this topic is very limited, leaving practitioners uncertain about the wisdom of their investments in interventions which enhance quality and patient safety. We assessed if eight different quality measures were associated with our targeted measure of hospital profitability: the net patient revenue per adjusted discharge. Using multivariate regression, we found that improving quality was significantly associated with our targeted measure of hospital profitability: the net patient revenue per adjusted discharge. Significant findings were reported for seven of eight quality measures tested, including the HCAHPS Summary Star Rating (p < 0.001), Hospital Compare Overall Rating (p < 0.001), All-Cause Hospital-Wide Readmission Rate (p < 0.01), Total Performance Score (p < 0.001), Safety Domain Score (p < 0.01), Person and Community Engagement Domain Score (p < 0.001), and the Efficiency and Cost Reduction Score (p < 0.001). Failing to address quality and patient safety issues is costly for US hospitals. We believe our findings support the premise that increased attention to the quality of care delivered as well as patients’ perceptions of care may allow hospitals to accentuate profitability and advance a hospital’s financial position. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)

Review

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30 pages, 957 KiB  
Review
A Scoping Review of Adult Inpatient Satisfaction with Mental Health Services
by Hossam Elgendy, Reham Shalaby, Ernest Owusu, Nnamdi Nkire, Vincent I. O. Agyapong and Yifeng Wei
Healthcare 2023, 11(24), 3130; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11243130 - 9 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1859
Abstract
Patient satisfaction with hospital services has been increasingly discussed as an important indicator of healthcare quality. It has been demonstrated that improving patient satisfaction is associated with better compliance with treatment plans and a decrease in patient complaints regarding doctors’ and nurses’ misconduct. [...] Read more.
Patient satisfaction with hospital services has been increasingly discussed as an important indicator of healthcare quality. It has been demonstrated that improving patient satisfaction is associated with better compliance with treatment plans and a decrease in patient complaints regarding doctors’ and nurses’ misconduct. This scoping review’s objective is to investigate the pertinent literature on the experiences and satisfaction of patients with mental disorders receiving inpatient psychiatric care. Our goals are to highlight important ideas and explore the data that might serve as a guide to enhance the standard of treatment and patient satisfaction in acute mental health environments. This study is a scoping review that was designed in adherence with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) statement. A systematic search was conducted in the following databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and EMBASE. A comprehensive review was completed, including articles from January 2012 to June 2022. Qualitative and quantitative studies were included in this review based on our eligibility criteria, such as patient satisfaction as a primary outcome, adult psychiatric inpatients, and non-review studies published in the English language. Studies were considered ineligible if they included nonpsychiatric patients or patients with neurocognitive disorders, review studies, or study measure outcomes other than inpatient satisfaction. For the eligible studies, data extraction was conducted, information was summarized, and the findings were reported. A total of 31 studies representing almost all the world’s continents were eligible for inclusion in this scoping review. Different assessment tools and instruments were used in the included studies to measure the level of patients’ satisfaction. The majority of the studies either utilized a pre-existing or newly created inpatient satisfaction questionnaire that appeared to be reliable and of acceptable quality. This review has identified a variety of possible factors that affect patients’ satisfaction and can be used as a guide for service improvement. More than half of the included studies revealed that the following factors were strongly recommended to enhance inpatient satisfaction with care: a clear discharge plan, less coercive treatment during the hospital stay, more individualized, higher quality information and teaching about the mental disorder to patients by staff, better therapeutic relationships with staff, and specific treatment components that patients enjoy, such as physical exercise sessions and music therapy. Patients also value staff who spend more time with them. The scope of patient satisfaction with inpatient mental health services is a growing source of concern. Patient satisfaction is associated with better adherence to treatment regimens and fewer complaints against health care professionals. This scoping review has identified several patient satisfaction research gaps as well as important determinants of satisfaction and how to measure and utilize patient satisfaction as a guide for service quality improvement. It would be useful for future research and reviews to consider broadening their scope to include the satisfaction of psychiatric patients with innovative services, like peer support groups and other technologically based interventions like text for support. Future research also could benefit from utilizing additional technological tools, such as electronic questionnaires. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
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Other

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20 pages, 2204 KiB  
Systematic Review
Patients and Healthcare Providers’ Perspectives on Patient Experience Factors and a Model of Patient-Centered Care Communication: A Systematic Review
by Eun-Jeong Kim, Yoo-Ri Koo and Inn-Chul Nam
Healthcare 2024, 12(11), 1090; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12111090 - 26 May 2024
Viewed by 354
Abstract
Effective communication between patients and healthcare providers is essential for a positive patient experience (PE), and improving patient-centered care (PCC) involves many factors. This study aimed to (1) identify the factors that affect PE improvement, (2) reflect patients and healthcare providers’ perspectives on [...] Read more.
Effective communication between patients and healthcare providers is essential for a positive patient experience (PE), and improving patient-centered care (PCC) involves many factors. This study aimed to (1) identify the factors that affect PE improvement, (2) reflect patients and healthcare providers’ perspectives on the factors’ importance, and (3) present a structural model for improving PCC. A systematic review of empirical studies that specified PE factors was conducted. Studies that did not reflect users’ perspectives and non-empirical studies were excluded. The literature was searched using Google Scholar, PubMed, Web of Science, and the Taylor and Francis online journal. The MMAT 2018 checklist was used to assess bias in the included studies, and frequency, content, and thematic analyses were employed to synthesize the results, yielding 25 articles. The 80 PE factors identified from the analyses were categorized into six categories: Practice, Physical Needs, Psychological Needs, Social Needs, Practical Needs, and Information Needs. From a user perspective, patients emphasized professional, continuous, and comprehensive service delivery, whereas healthcare providers stressed efficient system improvements and positive provider–patient relationships. We propose a structured model for PCC improvement using a service blueprint and system map. The PCC model provides an overview of the interactions and the roles of all stakeholders regarding quality of care to improve healthcare. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review Research on Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety)
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