The Association between Dietary Intake, Food Consumption and Chronic Disease

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Nutrition and Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1190

Special Issue Editor

Medicine and Psychology School, Autonomous University of Baja California, Tijuana 22390, Mexico
Interests: nutrition; obesity; diet; chronic diseases; genetics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Diet contributes to the development of many chronic conditions including obesity, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension, stroke, type 2 diabetes, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, some cancers, and neurological diseases. The prevalence of these conditions is proliferating not only in developing countries, but also in developed countries, accounting for a high proportion of deaths globally.

The studied dietary factors associated with chronic diseases include regional dietary patterns, the consumption of specific foods or food groups (i.e., whole grains, vegetables, red meats, dairy products, etc.), and the intake of macronutrients (fats, carbohydrates, protein, fiber), micronutrients (vitamins and minerals), and bioactive compounds (i.e., polyphenols, flavonoids, etc.). These relationships depend on several factors such as the dosage, time of exposition, bioavailability, and food preparation processes.

This Special Issue of Healthcare is dedicated to addressing the association between these dietary features and the prevalence/occurrence of chronic diseases, welcoming original research articles and reviews on humans and experimental models.

Dr. Omar Ramos-Lopez
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • diet
  • dietary pattern
  • food consumption
  • chronic disease
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • liver disease
  • cardiovascular disease
  • nutrition
  • nutrient

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 1575 KiB  
Article
The Role of Diet and Physical Activity in Shaping COVID-19 Severity: Design, Validation, and Application of a Retrospective Questionnaire
by Francisco Vásquez-Aguilar, Marcela de Jesús Vergara-Jiménez, Oscar G. Figueroa-Salcido, Jesús Gilberto Arámburo-Gálvez, Feliznando Isidro Cárdenas-Torres, Noé Ontiveros, Erika Martínez-López and Elisa Barrón-Cabrera
Healthcare 2024, 12(8), 813; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare12080813 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 257
Abstract
After the global challenges posed by COVID-19, researchers strived to identify risk factors for severe cases, which lead to various complications—including death. Lifestyle modifications, such as implementing a healthy diet and recommended physical activity, have been shown to be protective against severe COVID-19 [...] Read more.
After the global challenges posed by COVID-19, researchers strived to identify risk factors for severe cases, which lead to various complications—including death. Lifestyle modifications, such as implementing a healthy diet and recommended physical activity, have been shown to be protective against severe COVID-19 cases. Despite an association of a plant-based diet with reduced COVID-19 severity, specific dietary characteristics have not been identified. Also, the methodology for measuring physical activity is variable, with studies overlooking the intensity or the habit components of physical activity. To bridge this gap, our study designed, validated, and applied a retrospective questionnaire with aims of exploring the relationship between lifestyle factors, specifically diet and physical activity, and severe COVID-19. We considered the intensity and years of physical activity habit, which is a limitation of other questionnaires. Results reveal associations of age and BMI with severe COVID-19. An excessive sugar diet was found to be associated with severe COVID-19 and increased symptom duration. We also observed an inverse relationship pattern of moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity across case severity, which is absent in walking physical activity. This study lays a foundation for research aiming to identify lifestyle factors that prevent severe COVID-19 cases. Full article
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13 pages, 849 KiB  
Article
Dietary Intake of Capsaicin and Its Association with Markers of Body Adiposity and Fatty Liver in a Mexican Adult Population of Tijuana
by Yesenia Martínez-Aceviz, Ana Alondra Sobrevilla-Navarro and Omar Ramos-Lopez
Healthcare 2023, 11(22), 3001; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11223001 - 20 Nov 2023
Viewed by 711
Abstract
Background: Capsaicin (CAP) is the main chemical component responsible for the pungency (burning pain) of the chili plant (capsicum spp.), whose metabolic functions include energy balance and fatty acid oxidation. The aim of this study is to analyze the association of dietary [...] Read more.
Background: Capsaicin (CAP) is the main chemical component responsible for the pungency (burning pain) of the chili plant (capsicum spp.), whose metabolic functions include energy balance and fatty acid oxidation. The aim of this study is to analyze the association of dietary capsaicin consumption with markers of adiposity and fatty liver in a Mexican adult population. Methods: This cross-sectional/analytical study recruited 221 subjects aged 18 to 65 years who were resident in the city of Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. The daily CAP intake was analyzed through a validated chili/CAP consumption questionnaire. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements were performed following standardized protocols. Adjusted Pearson’s correlations were applied to analyze the association of CAP with adiposity and fatty liver markers. Results: In this study, the daily average consumption of CAP was 152.44 mg. The dietary CAP consumption positively correlated with BMI (r = 0.179, p = 0.003), hip circumference (r = 0.176, p = 0.004) and body adiposity index (r = 0.181, p = 0.001. Likewise, the daily CAP intake positively correlated with hepatic steatosis index (r = 0.158, p = 0.004), fatty liver index (r = 0.141, p = 0.003) and lactate dehydrogenase (r = 0.194, p = 0.016) after statistical settings. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest positive associations between dietary CAP consumption and the markers of body adiposity and fatty liver in a Mexican adult population. Full article
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