Healthcare Policy, Inequity, and Systems Research

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 2153

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Public Health, Medical University of Warsaw, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: health care systems; evidence based health policy and public health; preventive medicine; health promotion; cancer control policies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Population Health, School of Public Health, Centre of Postgraduate Medical Education, 01-826 Warsaw, Poland
Interests: tobacco control; tobacco related diseases; e-cigarettes; heated tobacco products; lifestyle medicine; prevention programmes; health policy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Healthcare policy and systems research seeks to understand and improve how societies organize themselves in achieving collective health goals, and how different stakeholders interact in the policy and implementation processes to contribute to policy outcomes. Healthcare policy, inequity, and systems analyses may provide important evidence supporting public policies. The COVID-19 pandemic had a negative impact on population health, including limited access to healthcare, delay in diagnosis and treatment of non-communicable diseases as well as deepening health inequalities. There is a need to exchange international experiences in the field of healthcare policy and health system management that may support health policy planning and management globally, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

This Special Issue aims to present the diversity and progress of research in the field of healthcare policy, inequity, and systems research as well as evidence-based public health interventions to improve the health status of different populations.

In this Special Issue, we invite researchers in health policy, public health, epidemiology, management, quality assurance, preventive medicine, health economics, and other social sciences to submit high-quality original papers or systematical reviews related to the issues in this research area.

Prof. Dr. Mariusz Gujski
Dr. Mateusz Jankowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Healthcare is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthcare
  • health policy
  • healthcare inequity
  • systems research
  • access to healthcare
  • universal health coverage
  • health policy programs
  • public health interventions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 1314 KiB  
Article
Resident Impact of the Single Site Order Restricting Staff Mobility across Long-Term Care Homes in British Columbia, Canada
by Farinaz Havaei, Sabina Staempfli, Andy Ma, Joanie Sims-Gould, Thea Franke and Minjeong Park
Healthcare 2023, 11(24), 3190; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11243190 - 17 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The Single Site Order (SSO)—a policy restricting staff from working at multiple long-term care (LTC) homes—was mandated by the Public Health Agency of Canada to control the spread of COVID-19 in LTC homes, where nearly 70% of COVID-19-related deaths in Canada occurred. This [...] Read more.
The Single Site Order (SSO)—a policy restricting staff from working at multiple long-term care (LTC) homes—was mandated by the Public Health Agency of Canada to control the spread of COVID-19 in LTC homes, where nearly 70% of COVID-19-related deaths in Canada occurred. This mixed methods study assesses the impact of the SSO on LTC residents in British Columbia. Interviews were conducted (residents (n = 6), family members (n = 9), staff (n = 18), and leadership (n = 10) from long-term care homes (n = 4)) and analyzed using thematic analysis. Administrative data were collected between April 2019 and March 2020 and between April 2020 and March 2021 and analyzed using descriptive statistics and data visualization. Qualitative and quantitative data were triangulated and demonstrated that staffing challenges became worse during the implementation of the SSO, resulting in the mental and physical health deterioration of LTC residents. Qualitative data demonstrated decreased time for personalized and proactive care, increased communication challenges, and increased loneliness and isolation. Quantitative data showed a decline in activities of daily living, increased antipsychotic medication use, pressure ulcers, behavioural symptoms, and an increase in falls. Addressing staff workload and staffing shortages during SSO-related policy implementation is essential to avoid resident health deterioration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Policy, Inequity, and Systems Research)
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Review

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26 pages, 751 KiB  
Review
Socioeconomic Inequalities as a Cause of Health Inequities in Spain: A Scoping Review
by Guillem Blasco-Palau, Jara Prades-Serrano and Víctor M. González-Chordá
Healthcare 2023, 11(23), 3035; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare11233035 - 24 Nov 2023
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Abstract
The objectives of this review were to identify the population groups most frequently studied, to determine the methods and techniques most commonly used to show health inequities, and to identify the most frequent socioeconomic and health indicators used in the studies on health [...] Read more.
The objectives of this review were to identify the population groups most frequently studied, to determine the methods and techniques most commonly used to show health inequities, and to identify the most frequent socioeconomic and health indicators used in the studies on health inequities due to socioeconomic inequalities that have been carried out on the Spanish healthcare system. A scoping review was carried out of the studies conducted in the Spanish State and published in literature since 2004, after the publication of the Law of Cohesion and Quality of the National Health System. The PRISMA extension for scoping reviews was followed. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the critical reading guides of the Joanna Briggs Institute and an adaptation of the STROBE guide for ecological studies. A total of 58 articles out of 811 articles were included. Most of the articles were (77.59%, n = 45) cross-sectional studies, followed by ecological studies (13.8%, n = 8). The population group used was uneven, while the main geographical area under investigation was the whole state (51.7%, n = 30) compared to other territorial distributions (48.3%, n = 28). The studies used a multitude of health and socioeconomic indicators, highlighting self-perception of health (31.03%, n = 19) and social class (50%, n = 29). The relationship between better health and better socioeconomic status is evident. However, there is variability in the populations, methods, and indicators used to study health equity in Spain. Future health research and policies require greater systematization by public institutions and greater cooperation among researchers from disciplines such as sociology, economics, and health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthcare Policy, Inequity, and Systems Research)
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