Women in Geriatrics

A special issue of Geriatrics (ISSN 2308-3417).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 11765

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Department of Medicine and Surgery, University of Perugia, 06132 Perugia, Italy
Interests: aging; geriatrics; nutrition; senescence; telomeres; telomerase; dementia; cognition; diabetes; metabolism
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Guest Editor
Geriatric Unit, Maggiore Hospital, Azienda USL di Bologna, Bologna, Italy
Interests: aging; frailty; transitional care; healthcare management; well-being; iNPH

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Supporting gender equity for women working in geriatrics is important for the growth of such an important discipline. Women working in the geriatrics field experience implicit and explicit discriminatory practices that mirror the available data on the entire workforce. Currently, for example, women represent 46% of medical doctors in Italy, but they often do not have highly qualified roles.

Gender dimorphism in the demographic profile has been also shown: “geriatrics is about women”. Women have a longer lifespan than men, although they spend many of those years, and more, with an unhealthy status. Older women are more likely than men to have chronic health conditions. They are often frail and more likely to have memory or other “cognitive” disorders. Recent studies have demonstrated a differing pattern of multimorbidity by gender, with greater functional impairment among women and more comorbidity among men, although without any differences in the prognosis.

The role of women in geriatrics, however, is far more complex, especially considering that caregivers, who play a consistent role in the assistance provided to older patients, are predominantly women, including daughters and/or wives. Thus, women dedicate more time and effort to helping the elderly, which can substantially affect their personal working and social life, especially as carers themselves grow older.

The aim of this Special Issue is to identify the main topics related to women in geriatrics as workers, patients, and caregivers. The objective is to underline the differences and to investigate gender inequity, focusing on concrete and practical solutions to improve geriatric practice.

Dr. Virginia Boccardi
Dr. Liliana Mazza
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geriatrics is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Women
  • Gender
  • Caregivers
  • Gender discrepancies

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

11 pages, 438 KiB  
Article
Outpatient Service Use in Korean Older Adult Women with Degenerative Arthritis Based on Andersen’s Model
by Soyoung Jang and Eunyoung E. Suh
Geriatrics 2023, 8(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics8010009 - 6 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1160
Abstract
To ensure that older adults (aged 65 years or older) can experience a healthy life, they should use medical services that are appropriate, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This study aimed to identify the factors affecting outpatient service use by older adult women with [...] Read more.
To ensure that older adults (aged 65 years or older) can experience a healthy life, they should use medical services that are appropriate, both quantitatively and qualitatively. This study aimed to identify the factors affecting outpatient service use by older adult women with degenerative arthritis using Andersen’s model. A survey was conducted among 232 older adult women with degenerative arthritis in two university hospitals in Seoul. The Korean Activities of Daily Living, Korean Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, and the Geriatric Depression Scale Short Form were used. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, χ2-test, t-test, and multiple logistic regression analysis. Among the participants, 69.8% used outpatient services and 30.2% did not. In the univariate analyses, age, marital status, residency, household income, chronic diseases, subjective health status, and disability were significant. Age (odds ratio [OR] = 5.53, p < 0.001), annual household income (OR = 5.64, p < 0.001), chronic diseases (OR = 11.06, p < 0.001), and disability (OR = 3.56, p = 0.016) significantly affected outpatient service use. The results suggest that health promotion interventions for Korean older adult women should focus on predicting outpatient service use according to the patient’s characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Geriatrics)
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13 pages, 665 KiB  
Article
Key Factors and AI-Based Risk Prediction of Malnutrition in Hospitalized Older Women
by Nekane Larburu, Garazi Artola, Jon Kerexeta, Maria Caballero, Borja Ollo and Catherine M. Lando
Geriatrics 2022, 7(5), 105; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7050105 - 26 Sep 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1830
Abstract
The numerous consequences caused by malnutrition in hospitalized patients can worsen their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition on the elderly population, especially focusing on women, identify key factors and develop a malnutrition risk [...] Read more.
The numerous consequences caused by malnutrition in hospitalized patients can worsen their quality of life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of malnutrition on the elderly population, especially focusing on women, identify key factors and develop a malnutrition risk predictive model. The study group consisted of 493 older women admitted to the Asunción Klinika Hospital in the Basque Region (Spain). For this purpose, demographic, clinical, laboratory, and admission information was gathered. Correlations and multivariate analyses and the MNA-SF screening test-based risk of malnutrition were performed. Additionally, different predictive models designed using this information were compared. The estimated frequency of malnutrition among this population in the Basque Region (Spain) is 13.8%, while 41.8% is considered at risk of malnutrition, which is increased in women, with up to 16.4% with malnutrition and 47.5% at risk of malnutrition. Sixteen variables were used to develop a predictive model obtaining Area Under the Curve (AUC) values of 0.76. Elderly women assisted at home and with high scores of dependency were identified as a risk group, as well as patients admitted in internal medicine units, and in admissions with high severity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Geriatrics)
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9 pages, 807 KiB  
Article
Comparison of Physical Function among Elderly Japanese Women with and without Low Bone Mass and Low Muscle Mass: A Cross-Sectional Study of Older Women Who Engage in Regular Physical Activity
by Tsuyoshi Katsurasako, Shin Murata, Akio Goda, Hideki Nakano, Kayoko Shiraiwa, Jun Horie and Koji Nonaka
Geriatrics 2022, 7(5), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7050098 - 14 Sep 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2067
Abstract
A decline in physical function is common among elderly people who have lost both bone and muscle mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between low bone and muscle mass and physical function in elderly women of different age [...] Read more.
A decline in physical function is common among elderly people who have lost both bone and muscle mass. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between low bone and muscle mass and physical function in elderly women of different age groups who exercise regularly. The analysis included 299 elderly women. Low bone mass was determined by a T-score of −2.5 or less, and low muscle mass was determined by a skeletal muscle mass index of <5.7 kg/m2. Physical function was measured by grip strength, knee extension strength, standing ability, gait function, and balance function. The participants were divided into four groups based on bone and muscle mass (healthy, low bone mass, low muscle mass, and low bone and muscle mass groups), and their physical functions were compared. There were no statistically significant differences in physical function between the low bone and muscle mass and the healthy groups. There were also no statistically significant differences in physical function among the four groups in the late elderly stage (75 and older). Elderly women who exercise regularly are less likely to experience a decline in physical function, even if they have reduced bone and muscle mass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Geriatrics)
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9 pages, 2576 KiB  
Article
Gender Parity in Geriatrics Editorial Boards
by Sana Shah, Nichole B. Shumway, Emily W. Sarvis, Joe A. Sena, Alesia Voice, Aqsa Mumtaz and Abu Baker Sheikh
Geriatrics 2022, 7(5), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics7050090 - 3 Sep 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1845
Abstract
Gender equality, with an emphasis on female education, has been designated by the United Nations as one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be completed by 2030, since gender disparity is a major impediment to scientific and economic progress. This study [...] Read more.
Gender equality, with an emphasis on female education, has been designated by the United Nations as one of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to be completed by 2030, since gender disparity is a major impediment to scientific and economic progress. This study was carried out in an effort to address the gender gaps that can be seen in academic and scientific publications. The purpose of this study is to describe the gender distribution of editorial board members and editors-in-chief across geriatrics journals with high impact factors. Clarivate Journal Citation Reports (JCR) 2021 were used to guide the selection of geriatric and gerontology journals utilizing Scopus All Science Journal Classification Codes. The genders of the editors-in-chief and editorial board members were determined and analyzed using publicly accessible data. A total of 47 geriatric journals with an average impact factor of 4.27 were examined. Of the 65 editors-in-chief, 21 (32%) were women, whereas 876 female editorial members were found out of a total of 2414, which constitutes 36% in total. Despite making up 60% of the geriatric medical workforce, women are still underrepresented on editorial boards and as chief editors in well-known geriatric periodicals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Geriatrics)
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11 pages, 243 KiB  
Article
The Association of Pain Levels and Low Physical Activity among Older Women
by Thelma J. Mielenz, Jing Tian, Kevin D. Silverman, Adam M. Whalen, Sneha Kannoth, Laura L. Durbin, Alexander S. Perlmutter and Qian-Li Xue
Geriatrics 2021, 6(4), 103; https://doi.org/10.3390/geriatrics6040103 - 23 Oct 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3298
Abstract
There is an integral research gap regarding whether there is a relationship between pain levels and low physical activity among older women. This is a secondary analysis of a longitudinal cohort study, the Women’s Health and Aging Study (WHAS) II. Our analyses included [...] Read more.
There is an integral research gap regarding whether there is a relationship between pain levels and low physical activity among older women. This is a secondary analysis of a longitudinal cohort study, the Women’s Health and Aging Study (WHAS) II. Our analyses included 436 community-dwelling women between the ages of 70 and 79, who were followed for 10.5 years. We employed marginal structural modeling, which controls for time-dependent confounding, with the aim of assessing the potential direct association between pain levels and low physical activity and assess a graded relationship. Compared to women with no pain, those with widespread pain were nearly half as likely to be moderately active versus low active (aOR: 0.46, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22, 0.96). A graded association was observed across the four pain levels (no pain or mild pain, other pain, moderate or severe lower extremity pain, and widespread pain) on low physical activity. Our findings indicate that reducing chronic widespread pain in older women may increase moderate physical activity, and therefore reduce the downstream health risks of low physical activity, including morbidity and mortality risk. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Women in Geriatrics)
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