Genetics and Evolution of Insects

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Animal Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2024 | Viewed by 1213

Special Issue Editor

1. Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA
2. Border Biomedical Research Center, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968, USA
Interests: bioinformatics; regulatory genomics; insect vectors; molecular genetics; cancer biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Many insects present a serious threat to global health as a major source of disease transmission. On the other hand, insects can be beneficial for pollinating plants, controlling pests, as food for other animals, etc. Different aspects of biology, ecology and evolution have been studied in insects; fruit flies especially have been an excellent model organism for studying genetics and evolution. Through various adaptations and genetic evolution, insects have acquired mechanisms that guarantee their evolutionary success. These may include the reproductive strategies of blood-feeding insects, which assist not only in their survival but also the mechanisms for disease transmission and strategies related to social behavior and migration. These intricate evolutionary adaptations and genetic changes are being explored further using omics approaches that can unravel the evolution of the complex genetic and molecular mechanisms governing these processes. The rapid development of omics technologies has allowed researchers to quickly obtain molecular data and investigate the genetic and evolutionary changes in different organisms. The availability of multiple insect genomes has created an outstanding potential for comparative, functional, and phylo-genomic studies among insects and has led to a wealth of information on organismal biology. This Special Issue aims to highlight the advancement in our understanding of the genetic and evolutionary aspects of insects.

We are inviting original research papers and short communications of preliminary but significant experimental results. We also invite review articles in relevant areas. The topics include but are not limited to the following:

  • Insect molecular genetics;
  • Insect genomics;
  • Insect molecular evolution;
  • Insect molecular identification;
  • Evolutionary biology of insects;
  • Genetics and evolution of social behavior;
  • Genetics and evolution of migration;
  • Topics that are of interest to the genetic and evolutionary entomologists.

Dr. Sourav Roy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • insect molecular genetics
  • insect genomics
  • insect molecular evolution
  • insect molecular identification
  • evolutionary biology of insects
  • genetics and evolution of social behavior
  • genetics and evolution of migration

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

19 pages, 2029 KiB  
Article
Large-Scale Cytochrome C Oxidase Subunit I Gene Data Analysis for the Development of a Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Test Capable of Identifying Biting Midge Vector Species and Haplotypes (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) of the Culicoides Subgenus Avaritia Fox, 1955
by Oliver Dähn, Doreen Werner, Bruno Mathieu and Helge Kampen
Genes 2024, 15(3), 323; https://doi.org/10.3390/genes15030323 - 1 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1005
Abstract
The emergence of culicoid-transmitted bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in several European countries demonstrated the ability of indigenous biting midge species to transmit pathogens. Entomologic research programs identified members of the Obsoletus Group (Culicoides subgenus Avaritia) as keyplayers in disease epidemiology in [...] Read more.
The emergence of culicoid-transmitted bluetongue and Schmallenberg viruses in several European countries demonstrated the ability of indigenous biting midge species to transmit pathogens. Entomologic research programs identified members of the Obsoletus Group (Culicoides subgenus Avaritia) as keyplayers in disease epidemiology in Europe. However, morphological identification of potential vectors is challenging due to the recent discovery of new genetic variants (haplotypes) of C. obsoletus sensu stricto (s.s.), forming distinct clades. In this study, 4422 GenBank entries of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene of subgenus Avaritia members of the genus Culicoides were analyzed to develop a conventional multiplex PCR, capable of detecting all vector species and clades of the Western Palearctic in this subgenus. Numerous GenBank entries incorrectly assigned to a species were identified, analyzed and reassigned. The results suggest that the three C. obsoletus clades represent independent species, whereas C. montanus should rather be regarded as a genetic variant of C. obsoletus s.s. Based on these findings, specific primers were designed and validated with DNA material from field-caught biting midges which achieved very high diagnostic sensitivity (100%) when compared to an established reference PCR (82.6%). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genetics and Evolution of Insects)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop